British colloquialisms
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26-03-2017, 01:37 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
(26-03-2017 01:22 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  I came across this one the other day.... "one sandwich short of a picnic."

I always liked "one brick short of a hod"

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26-03-2017, 01:39 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
(26-03-2017 01:22 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  I do love some of the Southern US insults. "Dumber than a box of rocks" seems to be a southern phrase. I've used this in reference to many a theist. Thumbsup I came across this one the other day.... "one sandwich short of a picnic."

Ok, this was a stupid thread but I still like British insults and phrases. Just sayin. Tongue

I have friends in Atlanta. They have hysterical insults, and sayings. Sometimes it takes a minute to realize they've insulted someone. They know how hilarious they sound to "Yankees", so they play on it ... and on top of that add in "gay Southern", they keep ya in stitches.

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27-03-2017, 03:32 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
Somebody mentioned about pretty much everything having an underlying humour to it in Britain, and as a British person, I'd say it's true. We're a weird nation; we hate everybody/have crap weather but love laughing. I think it's a war time thing that's carried over.

Anyway, some of my favourites are:

"He's had more time off that Gandhi's trainers"

"You're busier than a one armed brick layer in Baghdad"

There are literally hundreds of these types of thing, so if I think of anymore I'll come back.

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27-03-2017, 06:10 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
Americans don't understand English:





Big Grin

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27-03-2017, 07:13 AM (This post was last modified: 27-03-2017 09:56 AM by OakTree500.)
RE: British colloquialisms
Not sure if many have seen British comedian Micky Flannigan, but he does a good section on miscommunication between the US and UK, stemming from his own experience living in the states for a few years:

"In America, they call their bum there ass. Where I'm from, we call our house 'my 'ouse' [when said in a London cockney accent, sounds like aahss] as you can imagine this caused a bit of a problem. One day I took a lovely lady out to dinner, and said 'Look, when we get back, what are the chances of me coming in your 'ouse '. She said 'Oh my god you want to come in my ass?' I said, 'don't worry I wont make a mess, I won't try and kiss you or nothing...just let me come in your 'ouse' . "

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27-03-2017, 08:07 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 07:13 AM)OakTree500 Wrote:  Not sure if many have seen British comedian Micky Flannigan, but he does a good section on miscommunication between the US and UK, stemming from his own experience living in the states for a few years:

"In America, they call there bum there ass. Where I'm from, we call our house my 'ouse [when said in a London cockney accent, sounds like aahss] as you can imagine this caused a bit of a problem. One day I took a lovely lady out to dinner, and said 'Look, when we get back, what are the chances of me coming in your 'ouse '. She said 'Oh my god you want to come in my ass?' I said, 'don't worry I wont make a mess, I won't try and kiss you or nothing...just let me come in your 'ouse' . "

Ian McMillan made a programme for BBC radio in 2012 about his research into the border of the areas where the pronunciation of "house" became "'arse". It is called The 'arse That Jack Built and is available on BBC iPlayer Radio.

=====================
Sometimes leftpondian and rightpondian use of English is completely different. A fanny is a body part in both versions but the US fanny is the UK bum, and the UK fanny is the US pussy. (An American fanny pack is called a bum bag in Britain.)

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27-03-2017, 08:33 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
In this one Gloucester is responding to ukatheist. Talking about priests and sex education.

(17-08-2016 10:43 AM)Gloucester Wrote:  
(17-08-2016 09:52 AM)ukatheist Wrote:  Plus this is in a 'religious' school (c of e).

Well, most of them are damn near atheists anyway! At least most of their vicars know one end of a woman from the other.

:-D

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27-03-2017, 08:37 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
"He should be sectioned." I like that one.

#sigh
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27-03-2017, 08:44 AM (This post was last modified: 27-03-2017 10:53 AM by Mr. Boston.)
RE: British colloquialisms
I like how they say "bollocks," to mean, "oh shit," or "this is bullshit." In the US we don't really use "balls," that way very much; but bollocks seems classier somehow.

Also I'm sure it's considered somewhat vulgar but referring to guys as "cunts" is just hilarious to me. In the US that's just about the worst word you can say. Certainly not a term of endearment, lol.
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27-03-2017, 08:47 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
I keep reading this thread title as "British Cloaca".

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