British colloquialisms
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27-03-2017, 09:22 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 08:44 AM)Mr. Boston Wrote:  I like how they say "bollocks," to mean, "oh shit," or "this is bullshit." In the US we don't really use "balls," that way very much; but bollocks seems classier somehow, lol.

Also I'm sure it's considered somewhat vulgar but referring to guys as "cunts" is just hilarious to me. In the US that's just about the worst word you can say. Certainly not a term of endearment, lol.

highly recommend reading this about Bollocks, (Wiki page, nothing NSFW)

Explains how something can also be good by using the word bollocks lol. Most things have several meanings depending on the context here in the UK.

A friend of mine often says "that is the TITS" which for some reason means something is good lol.

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27-03-2017, 09:31 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 09:22 AM)OakTree500 Wrote:  A friend of mine often says "that is the TITS" which for some reason means something is good lol.

Well, that is perfectly reasonable and totally understandable!

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27-03-2017, 10:00 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
There are words that mean different things to us Americans.

1) Shag: A carpet or a hair cut. In South Carolina The Shag is the state dance. It's sort of a jitterbug type of dance. Not so in the UK. Shag means sex. Why? I donno, but there you have it.

2) Pissed: In the US this means you're really mad. In the UK it means you're drunk.

3) Thick: In the US this means....well...thick, the opposite of thin. But in the UK it means stupid and dumb.

Is a wonder that we can understand each other at all. Tongue

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27-03-2017, 10:41 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 10:00 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  3) Thick: In the US this means....well...thick, the opposite of thin. But in the UK it means stupid and dumb.

It can mean that here too... hearing somebody was 'thick' (as in 'thick as a brick') to mean they were not very smart was very common for me growing up. It's right there with 'dense'.

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27-03-2017, 11:04 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 09:22 AM)OakTree500 Wrote:  highly recommend reading this about Bollocks, (Wiki page, nothing NSFW)

Explains how something can also be good by using the word bollocks lol. Most things have several meanings depending on the context here in the UK.

A friend of mine often says "that is the TITS" which for some reason means something is good lol.

"Shit" can be like that too. Here in Boston you could refer to someone as a cool shit, hot shit, or good shit; all of which are very positive.

We're also home to perhaps the English language's most mis-used colloquialism, "wicked." People incorrectly assume we're using it in its adjective form: evil, morally repugnant, devilish, etc. Or as a standalone to say that something was extreme - like the East Coast's equivalent of gnarly.

Most commonly though it's a modifier meant to indicate the degree of whatever follows it, so it can either good or bad. The point is it's almost never used by itself:

"That math test was wicked hard."
"That Aerosmith concert was wicked awesome."
"The substitute teacher is wicked hot."
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27-03-2017, 12:08 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 10:00 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  There are words that mean different things to us Americans.

1) Shag: A carpet or a hair cut. In South Carolina The Shag is the state dance. It's sort of a jitterbug type of dance. Not so in the UK. Shag means sex. Why? I donno, but there you have it.

Shag can also mean loose tobacco. It's frequently referred to as rough shag, which is a source of innocent merriment in the UK.

(27-03-2017 10:00 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  2) Pissed: In the US this means you're really mad. In the UK it means you're drunk.

3) Thick: In the US this means....well...thick, the opposite of thin. But in the UK it means stupid and dumb.

Thick as in thick as two short planks. Plank is itself a term for a stupid person.

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27-03-2017, 12:12 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 11:04 AM)Mr. Boston Wrote:  We're also home to perhaps the English language's most mis-used colloquialism, "wicked." People incorrectly assume we're using it in its adjective form: evil, morally repugnant, devilish, etc. Or as a standalone to say that something was extreme - like the East Coast's equivalent of gnarly.

Most commonly though it's a modifier meant to indicate the degree of whatever follows it, so it can either good or bad. The point is it's almost never used by itself:

"That math test was wicked hard."
"That Aerosmith concert was wicked awesome."
"The substitute teacher is wicked hot."

Unless it's a wicked pisser (pissuh) which can be either good or bad depending on tone

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27-03-2017, 12:43 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 12:12 PM)unfogged Wrote:  Unless it's a wicked pisser (pissuh) which can be either good or bad depending on tone

Yeah there's that too. Someone who's wicked pisser is just an all-around good shit; unless it's used sarcastically, which is sometimes difficult for the outsider to know for sure.
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27-03-2017, 01:09 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
No idea where these come from:

harder than a brick bat

More xxxx than you can shake a stick at

don't have a pot to piss in or a window to throw it out of

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27-03-2017, 01:39 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
The Queen's English just seems a bit classier to me sometimes - more formal.

Ask an American, "Hey I'm thinking of ordering a pizza, would you have a slice?"
He'd answer, "I could."
A Brit might say, "I could do."

It's the same damn thing, but that just sounds fancier to me somehow.
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