British colloquialisms
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27-03-2017, 02:00 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 01:09 PM)Dom Wrote:  No idea where these come from:



don't have a pot to piss in

Back in the early Industrial revolution Leather was a much needed commodity (one of the reasons the bison was hunted damn near to extinction) it turns out that Piss contains certain chemicals and enzymes that help to cure leather so tanneries would pay for pots full of piss. Generally this was only done by the very poor as you had to keep the pot around until it was full, meaning you were Piss Poor. If you were even less well off than that you were so poor you didn't even have a pot to piss in.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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27-03-2017, 02:23 PM (This post was last modified: 27-03-2017 02:52 PM by LadyDay.)
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 02:00 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(27-03-2017 01:09 PM)Dom Wrote:  No idea where these come from:



don't have a pot to piss in

Back in the early Industrial revolution Leather was a much needed commodity (one of the reasons the bison was hunted damn near to extinction) it turns out that Piss contains certain chemicals and enzymes that help to cure leather so tanneries would pay for pots full of piss. Generally this was only done by the very poor as you had to keep the pot around until it was full, meaning you were Piss Poor. If you were even less well off than that you were so poor you didn't even have a pot to piss in.

It could more likely just refer to the night pot people used to pee in, in the cities, before sewers. That would also explain the second half you omitted, "or a window to throw it out of" , since emptying it out of the window and onto the street was literally what you did in the cities. Everybody. There wasn't a better alternative. Caused a lot of spread of disease and must've smelled horrendously!

Awesome saying! I'm gonna start using that!

"I believe that while not all people are essentially good, most are trying" - Adam Savage
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27-03-2017, 04:13 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
Sweet fanny adams - nothing

Slag/slapper - a promiscuous woman

Fag hag - straight woman who hangs out with gay men

Tighter than a ducks arse - very tight (a ducks arse being watertight)

But tight can also mean a miser, and tights are what we call panty hose.



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27-03-2017, 04:22 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
Fugly- fucking ugly

Sad - pathetic/embarrasing

Full of the joys of spring - upbeat

Killer - good (as in that song is killer)

Totty - a good looking woman

Tip top totty - a very good looking woman

Tool/bell end/dipshit - idiot


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27-03-2017, 04:56 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
"... and Bob's your uncle." (usually tagged onto the end of some recipe for success)
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27-03-2017, 05:12 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
Some help with the provenance of a couple I've seen on the internet-

"Right munter" I know what it means, and know what "right" means in this context, but where does "munter" come from?

"Hell's Bells and bloody goldfish" ?
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27-03-2017, 06:16 PM
RE: British colloquialisms
A lot of our artful insulting isn't about the swears for me. The swears are just like salt n pepper. As an Englishman, I know the way 'criaic' works.

My personal like for our insulting is the painting of a ridiculous mental image to liken the recipient of the insult to.

Mate, watching you trying to fix that bike is like watching a clown fucking a doorknob.

I'm not saying she was ugly but she had a face like someone had been sick on a balloon.

Lad, if your brains were dynamite, you'd be lucky if you took your fucking eyebrows off.

I'm not saying he's stingy but he's got short arms and deep pockets.

These are all phrases I hear regularly in and around my area. Smile

There's just a friendly gentle ribbing about it. A lot of the way it is, can't be conveyed in type. It's the delivery! Smile

I'll just play the 'can I help you' lick!!!
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28-03-2017, 04:14 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
there are some slightly more vulgar ones, but they make me laugh:

"Lads, she was wetter than an otters pocket"

"I'm sweating more than a peado wearing a clown suit in a playground"

And so on. Honestly there are millions of them

"Whatever you say, Stone Cold Steve Austin." - Rick
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28-03-2017, 04:57 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(27-03-2017 05:12 PM)Fireball Wrote:  Some help with the provenance of a couple I've seen on the internet-

"Right munter" I know what it means, and know what "right" means in this context, but where does "munter" come from?

"Hell's Bells and bloody goldfish" ?

I have never come across "munter" in speech or writing.

I am familiar with "Hell's bells and buckets of blood", but changing it to goldfish seems a bit strange.

===========================
Is the phrase "couldn't organise a piss-up in a brewery" used in the USA. (A piss-up iosc a drinking session.) The company I worked for in the 1980s were engaged to carry out a project in a brewery and, no, they couldn't.

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28-03-2017, 05:10 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
We also have 'couldn't fight his way out of a paper bag'

We brits also seem to have an affinity with the word 'sod', often used in place of 'fuck' e.g.

Sod off
Where are my sodding keys

But someone can also be a sod, kids are little sods if they are unpleasant.

And we also have sods law, with the same meaning as Murphys law.

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