British colloquialisms
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
28-03-2017, 07:13 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(28-03-2017 05:10 AM)ukatheist Wrote:  We also have 'couldn't fight his way out of a paper bag'

Can you also say "couldn't fight his way out of a wet paper bag" to really rub it in. As well as "he was 11 stone wet through" [with 1 stone being 14lbs] to signify that not only was this person light, but probably lighter than that due to the aforementioned wetness haha.

My personal favourite "you couldn't organise a piss up in a brewery".

And whomever mentioned it "munter" is a decent word, normally meaning really ugly. You also have "minger" or "that mings" for something that is stinky/generaly isn't nice haha

I don't want Fop, goddamn it! I'm a Dapper Dan man!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes OakTree500's post
28-03-2017, 09:00 AM (This post was last modified: 28-03-2017 09:08 AM by Thumpalumpacus.)
RE: British colloquialisms
I had a girlfriend from Ealing on the West End for a few years -- she taught me a few, sometimes on a lark, and sometimes in the heat of an argument ("tosser", anyone? [Image: 2hphhsy_th.jpg]) The one that sticks out most is "snogging" -- what we Americans call French-kissing, tongue-kissing, or as we say in Tejas, goin' at it. I thought to myself, what an obnoxious word for such a wonderful thing.

Another one that cracked me up was "fanny". In America, "fanny" means ass. To Limeys, it means pussy. So the first time I tell her, "Oh, my first girlfriend, she had a nice fanny," I was surprised to hear the reply, "Do you really need to tell me that? Really?"

(27-03-2017 10:00 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  There are words that mean different things to us Americans. [...]
Is a wonder that we can understand each other at all. Tongue

‘We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language’. -- Oscar Wilde

ETA: about Southernisms, y'all let me know if you want to hear some, between Mom and Dad I sure as hell picked up a few.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Thumpalumpacus's post
28-03-2017, 09:11 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(28-03-2017 04:57 AM)Norm Deplume Wrote:  Is the phrase "couldn't organise a piss-up in a brewery" used in the USA. (A piss-up iosc a drinking session.) The company I worked for in the 1980s were engaged to carry out a project in a brewery and, no, they couldn't.

No; incompetence on that scale gets "they could fuck up a wet dream."
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-03-2017, 09:18 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
Another good one to use, is "Wind your neck in", normally aimed at those who are mouthing off or something like that.

Being British is awesome Big Grin The only problem with our great language is everything becomes shortened and/or given a slang.

For example with 'snogging', It went from "come here my darling and lets have a romantic kiss" to "Lets have a snogging session" to "give me a snog" to "ERE LOVE, GIS A SNOG". I'm suprised anybody can understand a word we're saying sometimes.

I don't want Fop, goddamn it! I'm a Dapper Dan man!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like OakTree500's post
28-03-2017, 09:18 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
Can one of my usa friends explain why ladies underwear over there is 'panties' but 'pants' are trousers? What is mens underwear called?

Btw 'pants' over here are undercrackers, either male or female, and can also mean bad, as in 'theist arguments are pants'.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes ukatheist's post
28-03-2017, 09:24 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(28-03-2017 09:18 AM)ukatheist Wrote:  Can one of my usa friends explain why ladies underwear over there is 'panties' but 'pants' are trousers? What is mens underwear called?

Btw 'pants' over here are undercrackers, either male or female, and can also mean bad, as in 'theist arguments are pants'.

Sent from my ALE-L21 using Tapatalk

Undercrackers sound racist.

"If you keep trying to better yourself that's enough for me. We don't decide which hand we are dealt in life, but we make the decision to play it or fold it" - Nishi Karano Kaze
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
28-03-2017, 09:28 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
"Panties", I'm guessing, is the diminutive of pants. But so long as they're at her ankles, we're not too worried about what they're called. Tongue

Men's underwear aren't called "panties" here because there is nothing, I repeat, nothing diminutive about American masculinity.

Murrica!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Thumpalumpacus's post
28-03-2017, 09:59 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
(28-03-2017 09:00 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  I had a girlfriend from Ealing on the West End for a few years -- she taught me a few, sometimes on a lark, and sometimes in the heat of an argument ("tosser", anyone? [Image: 2hphhsy_th.jpg]) The one that sticks out most is "snogging" -- what we Americans call French-kissing, tongue-kissing, or as we say in Tejas, goin' at it. I thought to myself, what an obnoxious word for such a wonderful thing.

Another one that cracked me up was "fanny". In America, "fanny" means ass. To Limeys, it means pussy. So the first time I tell her, "Oh, my first girlfriend, she had a nice fanny," I was surprised to hear the reply, "Do you really need to tell me that? Really?"

(27-03-2017 10:00 AM)dancefortwo Wrote:  There are words that mean different things to us Americans. [...]
Is a wonder that we can understand each other at all. Tongue

‘We have really everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language’. -- Oscar Wilde

ETA: about Southernisms, y'all let me know if you want to hear some, between Mom and Dad I sure as hell picked up a few.

I remember the first time I found out that fanny meant ass in the US. My aunt from Ohio was on a visit to Ireland in the late 70's. I was in my early teens. She was telling about how it gets so hot back home, when sitting outside on the porch, within five minutes her fanny would stick to the chair. This conjured up a rather disturbing image in my mind....Tongue

“The first duty of a man is to think for himself” ― José Martí
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Marozz's post
28-03-2017, 11:05 AM
British colloquialisms
Us Brits sometimes find that our colloquialisms can cause us some confusion when abroad.

A few years ago - in fact about 15 years ago - I was visiting South Africa on business and in the office one day a not unattractive female colleague asked me if I had a "stiffy".

Now as a Brit I took this to mean, "Do you have an erection?"

Naturally I was somewhat abashed at her apparent knowledge of my state of arousal and didn't know quite what to say.

My confusion was rather obvious and so she looked at me and asked again this time with a 3.5 inch floppy disk in her hand.

It was then I realised that South Africans called a floppy a "stiffy".




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

The invisible and the non-existent look very much alike
Excreta Tauri Sapientam Fulgeat (The excrement of the bull causes wisdom to flee)
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like Silly Deity's post
28-03-2017, 11:33 AM
RE: British colloquialisms
Ruby Murray = curry
Plates of meat = feet
Apples and pears = stairs
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: