Brown pants moments.
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09-10-2016, 05:09 PM
RE: Brown pants moments.
To answer the title literally, one time this village elder on a route our convoy frequented made us a feast that I can best describe as camel curry served from a big communal table from which you ate by hand. It was really good but the next day we were all sick and while picking up a tow bar for one of the vehicles the pressure must have been just right and I actually did shit myself just a little bit.

'Murican Canadian
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10-10-2016, 12:20 PM
RE: Brown pants moments.
Not counting car and bicycle accidents (because they happen so fast that you don't have time to be scared until after it's all over), I can think of two:

(1) 1979, flying into Milwaukee at night in a dense fog (the flight had been delayed several hours because of the fog) -- the final descent was an absolute dive, the steepest I've ever experienced in any aircraft. I don't know whether this was an evasive maneuver or what, but it was pretty scary.

(2) 1991, doing a multi-pitch 5.7 rock climb (with a guide) on McGregor Slab outside of Rocky Mountain National Park. I'm on a hanging belay about halfway up the climb, with the guide climbing above me, when I glance up and notice that I'm clipped into my protection in a somewhat insecure manner -- i.e., the rope is just kind of "pinched" between the body and the gate of the carabiner. Any kind of sudden movement is going to cause that rope to go (a) inside the carabiner (no problem), or (b) outside the carabiner (we both die, since we're several hundred feet up). I yell up to the guide to make sure he's secure, and then I climb up and fix the clip. Whew! But we're not done yet. A little while later, a thunderstorm rolls in, and the top of McGregor Slab (or any mountain) is not a good place to be in a thunderstorm, so we start "simul-climbing" (still roped together, but with no protection or belays -- so if either of us falls, we both die) as fast as we can to get to the top and then down the backside. Fortunately, the slope levels off near the top, so the climbing is easier, but it's still at least 4th-class (definitely climbing rather than just hiking), so it's pretty scary. But we made it.
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10-10-2016, 12:37 PM
RE: Brown pants moments.
(10-10-2016 12:20 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:  Not counting car and bicycle accidents (because they happen so fast that you don't have time to be scared until after it's all over), I can think of two:

(1) 1979, flying into Milwaukee at night in a dense fog (the flight had been delayed several hours because of the fog) -- the final descent was an absolute dive, the steepest I've ever experienced in any aircraft. I don't know whether this was an evasive maneuver or what, but it was pretty scary.

(2) 1991, doing a multi-pitch 5.7 rock climb (with a guide) on McGregor Slab outside of Rocky Mountain National Park. I'm on a hanging belay about halfway up the climb, with the guide climbing above me, when I glance up and notice that I'm clipped into my protection in a somewhat insecure manner -- i.e., the rope is just kind of "pinched" between the body and the gate of the carabiner. Any kind of sudden movement is going to cause that rope to go (a) inside the carabiner (no problem), or (b) outside the carabiner (we both die, since we're several hundred feet up). I yell up to the guide to make sure he's secure, and then I climb up and fix the clip. Whew! But we're not done yet. A little while later, a thunderstorm rolls in, and the top of McGregor Slab (or any mountain) is not a good place to be in a thunderstorm, so we start "simul-climbing" (still roped together, but with no protection or belays -- so if either of us falls, we both die) as fast as we can to get to the top and then down the backside. Fortunately, the slope levels off near the top, so the climbing is easier, but it's still at least 4th-class (definitely climbing rather than just hiking), so it's pretty scary. But we made it.
Can relate to (2), climbing ain't for wimps!

Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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