Can the speed of light (299,792,458 m/s) accelerate?
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20-02-2015, 08:09 PM
RE: Can the speed of light (299,792,458 m/s) accelerate?
(20-02-2015 02:04 PM)smileXsmileXsmile Wrote:  Whatever dude, I'm not going to waste any more time on this petty situation. I was trying to understand how we came to understand this, I understand it now so it doesn't matter. You know I was looking for more than "that's just the way it is". Deuces

Do work you way though the viascience Relativity playlist I posted earlier in the thread before giving up on your search. The short answer is "the speed of light is constant in all reference frames" is more or less the thing that explains a serious amount of weirdness in the universe. We don't really know why it is so. We can more or less explain how it is so, but not really why. The reason it is well accepted is that it is the only known way to explain a bunch of weird experimental results, and when we make predictions assuming it to be true we find that those predictions are both mind-bendingly weird and unexpected and consistently backed up by experimental results.

Anyone who is able to overturn this fundamental plank in the theory of relativity or really explain why it is so will certainly gain themselves a nobel prize and will revolutionise our understanding of the universe.

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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20-02-2015, 08:41 PM
RE: Can the speed of light (299,792,458 m/s) accelerate?
(20-02-2015 01:18 AM)Free Thought Wrote:  
(19-02-2015 09:45 PM)smileXsmileXsmile Wrote:  A satellite can accelerate its speed by being slingshotted by the mass of jupiter, while jupiter's in motion. I can't figure out why light can't be slingshotted by a blackhole in motion and end up going faster than 299,792,458 m/s

I've been searching youtube and websites for an hour and can't understand it. Can someone explain.....or is it actually possible?

I'm not physicistcian, but I'd guess that light can't be slingshot to reach a greater velocity as it is already at the theoretical maximum velocity achievable.

Can we get an order of CJLR to table 3?

I'm not a physicistcian, but I play one on TV.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein God has a plan for us. Please stop screwing it up with your prayers.
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21-02-2015, 12:18 AM
RE: Can the speed of light (299,792,458 m/s) accelerate?
(20-02-2015 08:09 PM)Hafnof Wrote:  
(20-02-2015 02:04 PM)smileXsmileXsmile Wrote:  Whatever dude, I'm not going to waste any more time on this petty situation. I was trying to understand how we came to understand this, I understand it now so it doesn't matter. You know I was looking for more than "that's just the way it is". Deuces

Do work you way though the viascience Relativity playlist I posted earlier in the thread before giving up on your search. The short answer is "the speed of light is constant in all reference frames" is more or less the thing that explains a serious amount of weirdness in the universe. We don't really know why it is so. We can more or less explain how it is so, but not really why. The reason it is well accepted is that it is the only known way to explain a bunch of weird experimental results, and when we make predictions assuming it to be true we find that those predictions are both mind-bendingly weird and unexpected and consistently backed up by experimental results.

Anyone who is able to overturn this fundamental plank in the theory of relativity or really explain why it is so will certainly gain themselves a nobel prize and will revolutionise our understanding of the universe.

The playlist is great I'm already on number 8. in short the answer to my original question is that the speed of light won't accelerate because light has no mass. Thanks for the playlist it's badass

"If you cannot explain it simply, you don't understand it enough" -Albert Einstein
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22-02-2015, 04:42 AM
RE: Can the speed of light (299,792,458 m/s) accelerate?
The energy gained doesn't transfer into speed but rather alters the wavelength of the photon, making it shorter in this case, giving it a faster frequency.
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