Christian vs. Humanist Morality
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
02-02-2017, 06:14 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:09 PM)Naielis Wrote:  I certainly don't think I'm inexperienced.

This statement is spoken only by the inexperienced. Smile

Take my advice. You aren't cutting it mate. Your arguments do not make sense.

Give yourself some time to study the site. I mean, why not?

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Banjo's post
02-02-2017, 06:19 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:11 PM)Banjo Wrote:  
(02-02-2017 06:04 PM)Christian Philosophy Wrote:  Hi, Banjo thanks for the reply

I actually have read the entire work which I subscribe to, but I understand the concern. Ultimately I have come to a different conclusion in the midst of my examination. I appreciate your concern, and I agree if that was the case, I would not be in a great position.

Thanks,

Christian Philosophy

Hi.

What you say here needs to be addressed in another thread I think. You read the entire work and decided the xian message was love?

Were I you I'd read it again.

Since we are just meeting, I feel I should explain. My mind has been destroyed by serious chemicals. I am not at my best.

If you really want to discuss what is written in the bible, we can do that. If you wish to discuss the ancient Roman xian authors, we can do that too. I read them all.

Probably not on this thread though. It has become a confused mess. Smile

Hi again Banjo Yes,

Well, as a Christian, I do not quite hold this. I think the message of the Bible is God's glory and greatness in the midst of humanity. I think this encompasses love, justice, and goodness, among other great making attributes God exemplifies, or more appropriately given classical theism, is. As for your offer, this might be quite helpful. I am primarily here to address the philosophical questions touched upon, but in the future perhaps I would be open to this.

Yes yes I would not wish to crowd this thread, and hence I will refrain from discussing it on here.

Thanks again for the reply,

Christian Philosophy
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Christian Philosophy's post
02-02-2017, 06:21 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:09 PM)Naielis Wrote:  
(02-02-2017 06:05 PM)Banjo Wrote:  Thanks.

Mate here's my advice, for what it's worth.

Before you post anymore, read around the website. Check out the subjects and debates that have already taken place.

If you do this you will better understand the community. We have people here who are highly qualified professionals in subjects such as biology, physics, theology etc.

I'd discontinue this debate. As I said it is old news to us.

BTW, it is not a crime to be young and inexperienced. Smile

Good luck to you.

I've seen and taken part in many debates. I was an atheist for years. I'm young, but I certainly don't think I'm inexperienced.
BTW I don't think you're dumb just take a little time to settle in get to know us there's Americans Brits like me Australians Germans and more besides its a pot pourri on here and we all have our little foibles. Once settled in a bit debates will be more productive I think you'll find. Smile
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like adey67's post
02-02-2017, 06:25 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:14 PM)Banjo Wrote:  This statement is spoken only by the inexperienced. Smile

Take my advice. You aren't cutting it mate. Your arguments do not make sense.

Give yourself some time to study the site. I mean, why not?

I don't think you understand. I've debated this subject almost daily for years. I'm not inexperienced. I have no problem with exploring the site some more, but I don't think this is really the main issue. My arguments are used by many philosophers and theologians. They're valid arguments. It sounds like you're almost constructing an argument from incredulity.

"I think part of the appeal of mathematical logic is that the formulas look mysterious - you write backward Es!" - Hilary Putnam
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Naielis's post
02-02-2017, 06:27 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 09:37 AM)Naielis Wrote:  
(02-02-2017 09:28 AM)mordant Wrote:  Skepticism is a component of a worldview, not a worldview itself. It is more properly a component of one's epistemological view.

This is false. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/skepticism/
You haven't engaged on any of my actual points. I don't honestly give a fig what Stanford says philosophically about skepticism. I'm interested (or was, anyway) in what YOU think about it and whether you can argue for a better use of it than I have.

Skepticism is the rational default when evidence is lacking. It informs one's worldview (a general philosophy of life or conception of the meaning in the world). By itself, it is not sufficient to define a worldview, or at least not mine anyway. Mine is informed by my understanding and knowledge of science, reality and personal experience. I have found the human mind to be a sloppy tool with lots of well-understood flaws, and I deploy skepticism in the generally accepted ways to counter confirmation bias, agency inference, and the like. I do not afford belief to things that are not substantiated, and particularly not to things that are unsubstantiatable.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-02-2017, 06:34 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:27 PM)mordant Wrote:  
(02-02-2017 09:37 AM)Naielis Wrote:  This is false. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/skepticism/
You haven't engaged on any of my actual points. I don't honestly give a fig what Stanford says philosophically about skepticism. I'm interested (or was, anyway) in what YOU think about it and whether you can argue for a better use of it than I have.

Skepticism is the rational default when evidence is lacking. It informs one's worldview (a general philosophy of life or conception of the meaning in the world). By itself, it is not sufficient to define a worldview, or at least not mine anyway. Mine is informed by my understanding and knowledge of science, reality and personal experience. I have found the human mind to be a sloppy tool with lots of well-understood flaws, and I deploy skepticism in the generally accepted ways to counter confirmation bias, agency inference, and the like. I do not afford belief to things that are not substantiated, and particularly not to things that are unsubstantiatable.

Skepticism is not the same as doubt. You are using them as synonyms.

"I think part of the appeal of mathematical logic is that the formulas look mysterious - you write backward Es!" - Hilary Putnam
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-02-2017, 06:37 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:27 PM)mordant Wrote:  You haven't engaged on any of my actual points. I don't honestly give a fig what Stanford says philosophically about skepticism. I'm interested (or was, anyway) in what YOU think about it and whether you can argue for a better use of it than I have.

If you're referring to doubt, then I agree with you. There's no reason to believe something unless you have logical justification. But even to claim doubt, you would have to work under fallibilism.

"I think part of the appeal of mathematical logic is that the formulas look mysterious - you write backward Es!" - Hilary Putnam
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-02-2017, 06:39 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:25 PM)Naielis Wrote:  My arguments are used by many philosophers and theologians. They're valid arguments.
Valid in a classroom or an essay, but strangely divorced from something you inherently cannot have at your age, which is life experience.

Someday you'll understand the emptiness of theory in the face of practice.

I will echo Banjo ... nothing wrong with being young, but with youth often comes hubris and you should dial it down a notch or two, do more listening and less holding forth.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes mordant's post
02-02-2017, 06:49 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:34 PM)Naielis Wrote:  Skepticism is not the same as doubt. You are using them as synonyms.
As I use the term, skepticism has nothing to do with doubt. Doubt is uncertainty / lack of conviction. By itself it is not informed by facts, but by perception and emotion that may or may not be accurate. I doubt many things about which I am not skeptical. Mostly inconsequential things or things I have extensive experience with.

To me, skepticism is simply an understanding that my minds tends to want to believe things that aren't so. I was a theist for a long time, despite that the tenets of my religion of origin utterly failed to explain experienced reality or predict outcomes. At some point the cognitive dissonance was more than I could bear and I found an epistemology that explained experienced reality and the outcomes in my life. To do this I had to not doubt my former beliefs so much as be committed to believe them only if they could survive falsification. They completely failed on that score.

Now that may not be Stanford's approved meaning of skepticism, or even the best meaning, but it is what I am talking about when I use the word.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-02-2017, 06:50 PM
RE: Christian vs. Humanist Morality
(02-02-2017 06:39 PM)mordant Wrote:  
(02-02-2017 06:25 PM)Naielis Wrote:  My arguments are used by many philosophers and theologians. They're valid arguments.
Valid in a classroom or an essay, but strangely divorced from something you inherently cannot have at your age, which is life experience.

Someday you'll understand the emptiness of theory in the face of practice.

I will echo Banjo ... nothing wrong with being young, but with youth often comes hubris and you should dial it down a notch or two, do more listening and less holding forth.

Life experience is a conservative value. I'm a liberal. Tried tradition is not better than a priori reasoning. And hubris comes with anti-theism, not youth.

"I think part of the appeal of mathematical logic is that the formulas look mysterious - you write backward Es!" - Hilary Putnam
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: