Clay Routledge just basically put up an opinion article.
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22-07-2017, 01:12 PM
Clay Routledge just basically put up an opinion article.
And it is basically stupid Weeping

Quote:Are Americans becoming less religious? It depends on what you mean by “religious.”

Polls certainly indicate a decline in religious affiliation, practice and belief. Just a couple of decades ago, about 95 percent of Americans reported belonging to a religious group. This number is now around 75 percent. And far fewer are actively religious: The percentage of regular churchgoers may be as low as 15 to 20 percent. As for religious belief, the Pew Research Center found that from 2007 to 2014 the percentage of Americans who reported being absolutely confident God exists dropped from 71 percent to 63 percent.

Nonetheless, there is reason to doubt the death of religion, or at least the death of what you might call the “religious mind” — our concern with existential questions and our search for meaning. A growing body of research suggests that the evidence for a decline in traditional religious belief, identity and practice does not reflect a decline in this underlying spiritual inclination.

Ask yourself: Why are people religious to begin with? One view is that religion is an ancient way of understanding and organizing the world that persists largely because societies pass it down from generation to generation. This view is related to the idea that the rise of science entails the fall of religion. It also assumes that the strength of religion is best measured by how much doctrine people accept and how observant they are.

This view, however, does not capture the fundamental nature of the religious mind — our awareness of, and need to reckon with, the transience and fragility of our existence, and how small and unimportant we seem to be in the grand scheme of things. In short: our quest for significance.

Sounds plausible, then it immediately falls apart.

Quote:Dozens of studies show a strong link between religiosity and existential concerns about death and meaning. For example, when research participants are presented with stimuli that bring death to mind or challenge a sense of meaning in life, they exhibit increased religiosity and interest in religious or spiritual ideas. Another body of research shows that religious beliefs provide and protect meaning.

Quote:Furthermore, evidence suggests that the religious mind persists even when we lose faith in traditional religious beliefs and institutions. Consider that roughly 30 percent of Americans report they have felt in contact with someone who has died. Nearly 20 percent believe they have been in the presence of a ghost. About one-third of Americans believe that ghosts exist and can interact with and harm humans; around two-thirds hold supernatural or paranormal beliefs of some kind, including beliefs in reincarnation, spiritual energy and psychic powers.

...

Quote:When people are searching for meaning, their minds seem to gravitate toward thoughts of things like aliens that do not fall within our current scientific inventory of the world. Why? I suspect part of the answer is that such ideas imply that humans are not alone in the universe, that we might be part of a larger cosmic drama. As with traditional religious beliefs, many of these paranormal beliefs involve powerful beings watching over humans and the hope that they will rescue us from death and extinction.

A great many atheists and agnostics, of course, do not think U.F.O.s exist. I’m not suggesting that if you reject traditional religious belief, you will necessarily find yourself believing in alien visitors. But because beliefs about U.F.O.s and aliens do not explicitly invoke the supernatural and are couched in scientific and technological jargon, they may be more palatable to those who reject the metaphysics of more traditional religious systems.

It is important to note that thus far, research indicates only that the need for meaning inspires these types of paranormal beliefs, not that such beliefs actually do a good job of providing meaning. There are reasons to suspect they are poor substitutes for religion: They are not part of a well-established social and institutional support system and they lack a deeper and historically rich philosophy of meaning. Seeking meaning does not always equal finding meaning.

The Western world is, in theory, becoming increasingly secular — but the religious mind remains active. The question now is, how can society satisfactorily meet people’s religious and spiritual needs?

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/21/opini...ef=opinion
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22-07-2017, 02:08 PM
RE: Clay Routledge just basically put up an opinion article.
They didn't ask me. Did anybody else here get asked to participate in any of these "studies?" Gotta love well-documented research. And empirical evidence.

Where are we going and why am I in this hand basket?
"Life is not all lovely thorns and singing vultures, you know." ~ Morticia Addams
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22-07-2017, 02:23 PM (This post was last modified: 22-07-2017 03:43 PM by OmniConsUme.)
RE: Clay Routledge just basically put up an opinion article.
That last line nails it.

Background Info, This is one of the guys that is fighting for viewpoint diversty on campuses I kinda am part of it but, I disagree with this guy in his points., and considers extreme postmodernism in campuses quasi-religious. I kinda am part of it but, I disagree with this guy in his points.
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22-07-2017, 06:25 PM
RE: Clay Routledge just basically put up an opinion article.
As an alleged Psychology PhD I'm surprised Routledge seems (to me) to get so much basic stuff wrong, and/or misinterprets statistics—possibly deliberately in order to build his case.

As per these points sourced from different papers he's posted...

• "Atheists represent one of the least trusted and most despised groups in America".

• "One set of studies found that people tend to distrust atheists about as much as they distrust rapists".

• "There is a common belief that rejecting God is the same as rejecting morality".

• "People should recognize that many atheists feel marginalized in American society because most people are believers".

• "Religious belief is often associated with positive psychological, social, and physical health outcomes".

• "Research suggests that religion promotes trust. People believe that being watched and held accountable by a higher power helps keep them honest".

• "People who self-report that they are not religious engage in a significant amount of religious behavior".

• "Even those who do not identify themselves as religious are supernatural thinkers".

—My bolding indicates claims that should be supported with a citation. But Routledge seldom does this in any of his papers.

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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22-07-2017, 07:36 PM
RE: Clay Routledge just basically put up an opinion article.
(22-07-2017 06:25 PM)SYZ Wrote:  As an alleged Psychology PhD I'm surprised Routledge seems (to me) to get so much basic stuff wrong, and/or misinterprets statistics—possibly deliberately in order to build his case.

As per these points sourced from different papers he's posted...

• "Atheists represent one of the least trusted and most despised groups in America".

• "One set of studies found that people tend to distrust atheists about as much as they distrust rapists".

• "There is a common belief that rejecting God is the same as rejecting morality".

• "People should recognize that many atheists feel marginalized in American society because most people are believers".

• "Religious belief is often associated with positive psychological, social, and physical health outcomes".

• "Research suggests that religion promotes trust. People believe that being watched and held accountable by a higher power helps keep them honest".

• "People who self-report that they are not religious engage in a significant amount of religious behavior".

• "Even those who do not identify themselves as religious are supernatural thinkers".

—My bolding indicates claims that should be supported with a citation. But Routledge seldom does this in any of his papers.

Especially when Psychology is kinda having a replication problem.
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24-07-2017, 11:10 AM
RE: Clay Routledge just basically put up an opinion article.
Found his Blog:

Quote:Atheists represent one of the least trusted and most despised groups in America. This seems odd. Why is it so threatening for someone to opt out of religious belief? People believe and don’t believe in all sorts of things. And yet, atheists seem to really drive people nuts. Polls identify atheists as untrustworthy, unelectable for public office, and unworthy of marrying into one’s family. Here are some reasons why.

Reasons People Dislike Atheists (In No Particular Order)

1. As a general rule, people favor members of their own group. Most people in America are religious and thus to reject religion makes one a member of a minority outgroup.

Fine...

Quote:2. Atheists are viewed as buzzkills. For many people, religion offers inspiration and hope. In fact, there are numerous studies demonstrating that religious belief motivates people and helps them cope with the many challenges of life. In this way, religion contributes to psychological health. Thus, when someone says he or she thinks religion is a fiction, that person often comes off as a Debby Downer. And people don’t tend to like Debby Downers.

... seen evangelicals (this guys hate's religious Fundamentalism, but think they are marginallized in USA, in reality Evangelicals is dangerously close if not real Christian Fundamentalsim)

Quote:3. Research suggests that religion promotes trust. People believe that being watched and held accountable by a higher power helps keep them honest. This also means that religious people tend to believe that atheists are less trustworthy since they do not believe that there is a God monitoring their behavior. In fact, one set of studies found that people tend to distrust atheists about as much as they distrust rapists. Ouch.

...Show us, the studies, I will concede if you show us the studies.

Quote:4. Similarly, there is a common belief that rejecting God is the same as rejecting morality. However, countries that have high rates of atheism (Scandinavian nations) tend to have much lower violent crime and teen pregnancy rates than countries high in religiosity such as the United States. In addition, in the United States, the least religious states have the lowest violent crime rates. Like it or not, there is no compelling evidence that atheists are less moral than believers. Morality can be found with and without religion. In fact, research indicates that atheist parents spend a lot of time teaching their children to be moral, compassionate, and fair.

Yes.

Quote:5. Atheists are sometimes not very nice about their beliefs. This is a tricky one because most atheists just go about their business and are even very supportive of those who believe. In fact, many atheists are afraid to expose themselves as nonbelievers out of fear of prejudice. However, some atheists have taken the strong stance that religion is a social ill and thus use more combative tactics, which can include treating religious individuals like they are unintelligent and mentally weak. This approach obviously upsets religious people and can make them falsely believe that all atheists think this way.

Again I have no problem with Liberal Christianity but, the Protestants (evangelicals) is trying to turn this into a theocracy.

Quote:So what are some solutions that could improve people’s views of atheists and, ultimately, help everyone get along?

First, people should recognize that many atheists feel marginalized in American society because most people are believers. Believers should not feel threatened by atheists. People believe different things and someone not believing in God does not jeopardize your own beliefs.

However, atheists should try not to be buzzkills. And atheists should definitely not insult religious people. Looking down on people accomplishes nothing. We should be having thoughtful discussions and debates about philosophical questions related to religion as well as the social pros and cons of religion. But there are ways to do this respectfully and at appropriate times.

As a scientist who studies the psychology of religion, I can tell you these issues are very complex. Religious belief is often associated with positive psychological, social, and physical health outcomes. But certain types of religious beliefs and practices can also contribute to social conflict and compromise health. Further, atheists seem to be thriving mentally and physically as well. Their lack of belief does not appear to be causing any harm. In addition, there are plenty of intelligent and mentally resilient believers. And being an atheist does not mean you are a genius with no psychological vulnerabilities. Both sides need to realize that neither belief nor disbelief determine what kind of person someone is or what they are capable of accomplishing.
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