Clovis people
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10-11-2013, 07:09 PM
Clovis people
The Clovis were an ancient people. When I was a kid, another kid had come across arrowheads buried in sloping land, where a river ran near by but not close. Almost every shovelful revealed an arrowhead. Some were the size of a nickel and others about an inch to 2" long. When, more recently, I was researching arrowhead styles, I realized these had been made by the Clovis as the flint is chipped on both sides. Now, why so many in a relatively small area. The first thought was target practise but there was no sign of wood fragments. Now I'm thinking that perhaps three or four people were skilled in this craft and had been making these arrowheads as they sat around and chatted. For some reason they left that spot in a hurry. We found no bones but now they are being found along the river bank. The area that had been dug by the other kid was maybe 12' long by 4 or 5' wide and his collection contained hundreds. Finally after many years the archeologists are working along the edge of the river and have been coming up with interesting artifacts.
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10-11-2013, 08:30 PM
RE: Clovis people
[Image: 1346839458-auto-dafuq-dafuq-did-i-just-read-200165.jpeg]
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10-11-2013, 08:37 PM
RE: Clovis people
(10-11-2013 08:30 PM)The_Thinking_Theist Wrote:  [Image: 1346839458-auto-dafuq-dafuq-did-i-just-read-200165.jpeg]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_culture

Quote:The Clovis culture (sometimes referred to as the Llano culture[citation needed] is a prehistoric Paleo-Indian culture, named after distinct stone tools that were found at sites near Clovis, New Mexico, in the 1920s and 1930s. The Clovis culture appears around 11,500 RCYBP (radiocarbon years before present[1]), at the end of the last glacial period, characterized by the manufacture of "Clovis points" and distinctive bone and ivory tools. Archaeologists' most precise determinations at present suggest that this radiocarbon age is equal to roughly 13,500 to 13,000 calendar years ago.
The Clovis culture was replaced by several more localized regional cultures from the time of the Younger Dryas cold climate period onward. Post-Clovis cultures include the Folsom tradition, Gainey, Suwannee-Simpson, Plainview-Goshen, Cumberland, and Redstone. Each of these is commonly thought to derive directly from Clovis, in some cases apparently differing only in the length of the fluting on their projectile points. Although this is generally held to be the result of normal cultural change through time,[2] numerous other reasons have been suggested to be the driving force for the observed changes in the archaeological record, such as Younger Dryas impact event or post-glacial climate change with numerous faunal extinctions.
After the discovery of several Clovis sites in western North America in the 1930s, the Clovis people came to be regarded as the first human inhabitants of the New World. Clovis people were considered to be the ancestors of all the indigenous cultures of North and South America. However, this theory has been disproven, in the opinion of many archaeologists, by several archaeological discoveries, including sites like Cactus Hill in Virginia, Paisley Caves in the Summer Lake Basin of Oregon, the Topper site in Allendale County, South Carolina, Meadowcroft Rockshelter in Pennsylvania, the Friedkin[3] site in Texas, Cueva Fell in Chile and, especially, Monte Verde, also in Chile.[4] The claim to the oldest human archaeological site known in the Americas belongs to the Pedra Furada human remains and hearths, a site that precedes the Clovis culture and the other sites already mentioned by 19,000 to 30,000 years, but this discovery has become an issue of contention between North American archaeologists and their South American and European counterparts.[5][6][7]

I have heard a lot about the Clovis but not sure how much still holds.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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10-11-2013, 08:48 PM
RE: Clovis people
(10-11-2013 08:37 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(10-11-2013 08:30 PM)The_Thinking_Theist Wrote:  [Image: 1346839458-auto-dafuq-dafuq-did-i-just-read-200165.jpeg]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovis_culture

Quote:The Clovis culture (sometimes referred to as the Llano culture[citation needed] is a prehistoric Paleo-Indian culture, named after distinct stone tools that were found at sites near Clovis, New Mexico, in the 1920s and 1930s. The Clovis culture appears around 11,500 RCYBP (radiocarbon years before present[1]), at the end of the last glacial period, characterized by the manufacture of "Clovis points" and distinctive bone and ivory tools. Archaeologists' most precise determinations at present suggest that this radiocarbon age is equal to roughly 13,500 to 13,000 calendar years ago.
The Clovis culture was replaced by several more localized regional cultures from the time of the Younger Dryas cold climate period onward. Post-Clovis cultures include the Folsom tradition, Gainey, Suwannee-Simpson, Plainview-Goshen, Cumberland, and Redstone. Each of these is commonly thought to derive directly from Clovis, in some cases apparently differing only in the length of the fluting on their projectile points. Although this is generally held to be the result of normal cultural change through time,[2] numerous other reasons have been suggested to be the driving force for the observed changes in the archaeological record, such as Younger Dryas impact event or post-glacial climate change with numerous faunal extinctions.
After the discovery of several Clovis sites in western North America in the 1930s, the Clovis people came to be regarded as the first human inhabitants of the New World. Clovis people were considered to be the ancestors of all the indigenous cultures of North and South America. However, this theory has been disproven, in the opinion of many archaeologists, by several archaeological discoveries, including sites like Cactus Hill in Virginia, Paisley Caves in the Summer Lake Basin of Oregon, the Topper site in Allendale County, South Carolina, Meadowcroft Rockshelter in Pennsylvania, the Friedkin[3] site in Texas, Cueva Fell in Chile and, especially, Monte Verde, also in Chile.[4] The claim to the oldest human archaeological site known in the Americas belongs to the Pedra Furada human remains and hearths, a site that precedes the Clovis culture and the other sites already mentioned by 19,000 to 30,000 years, but this discovery has become an issue of contention between North American archaeologists and their South American and European counterparts.[5][6][7]

I have heard a lot about the Clovis but not sure how much still holds.

A New Mexican tribe that has gone over my head! Pas possible! Blink

*reads Wikipedia artcile*
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