Comebacks
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14-01-2016, 06:30 AM
RE: Comebacks
(14-01-2016 06:05 AM)Szuchow Wrote:  Whatever good idea he had they were buried under so many bad ideas that in practice they didn't mattered.


True, However knowing Imperial Russia as you must, it had to haapen, the revolution I mean. People can only be pushed down so far. This is one reason I expect another US civil war within the next 50 years.


I read Marx and consider him a dreadful philosopher. Nevertheless the revolution was bound to happen. Russia was a wreck. Especially during WWI with out of date equipment and bad uniforms and little supplies.

Did it improve under Stalin? Well for Stalin, yes. For those who fought against Franco, not so much. Smile

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14-01-2016, 06:53 AM
RE: Comebacks
(14-01-2016 06:30 AM)Banjo Wrote:  True, However knowing Imperial Russia as you must, it had to haapen, the revolution I mean. People can only be pushed down so far. This is one reason I expect another US civil war within the next 50 years.

To quote Antony Beevor: nothing in history is inevitable or perhaps only in hindsight.

But in wider context I agree, some form of revolution was probable even if not at that time. But future isn't written in stone nor there is one possible course of it that must end with communism.

(14-01-2016 06:30 AM)Banjo Wrote:  I read Marx and consider him a dreadful philosopher. Nevertheless the revolution was bound to happen. Russia was a wreck. Especially during WWI with out of date equipment and bad uniforms and little supplies.

Russia while far from Germany or GB was not a wreck I would say. New research published in Włodzimierz Borodziej and Maciej Górny in Nasza wojna. Imperia 1912-1916 (Our War. Empires 1912-1916) shows that Russia problem wasn't lack of supplies but rather troubles with their transport. If I'm remembering right also equipment wasn't bad but rather in short supply. And troubles with supplies touched all sides expecting another Franco-Prussian war. Russia wasn't only one experiencing shortages.

(14-01-2016 06:30 AM)Banjo Wrote:  Did it improve under Stalin? Well for Stalin, yes. For those who fought against Franco, not so much. Smile

Despite my utter dislike for Stalin, life indeed improve under him but I deem cost of such improvement too great. Neither I buy idiotic and made after the fact justification about cruelty being necessary for winning the war as another great conflict was not inevitable. II WW was post factum justification for monstrous crimes of Stalin regime. But progress remain fact, only cost of it is variously seen.

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14-01-2016, 07:07 AM
RE: Comebacks
I agree. By mentioning equipment and such I include transportation.

I do think revolution of some kind was on the cards. That is an historical cycle I've noticed. This is one of the great things about studying Roman and Byzantine history. History repeats.

As for America? I again quote Mr Johnson.

"By the subtitle, I really do mean it. This is not just hype to sell books — "The Last Days of the American Republic." I’m here concerned with a very real, concrete problem in political analysis, namely that the political system of the United States today, history tells us, is one of the most unstable combinations there is — that is, domestic democracy and foreign empire — that the choices are stark. A nation can be one or the other, a democracy or an imperialist, but it can’t be both. If it sticks to imperialism, it will, like the old Roman Republic, on which so much of our system was modeled, like the old Roman Republic, it will lose its democracy to a domestic dictatorship.
Chalmers Johnson.

Actually Szuchow, you'd enjoy Chalmers. His books are very good and he has been an advisor to the CIA. He knew what he was talking about. Sadly, most Americans don't really know him as far as I can tell.

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14-01-2016, 07:17 AM
RE: Comebacks
(14-01-2016 07:07 AM)Banjo Wrote:  I agree. By mentioning equipment and such I include transportation.

Ok, then.

(14-01-2016 07:07 AM)Banjo Wrote:  I do think revolution of some kind was on the cards. That is an historical cycle I've noticed. This is one of the great things about studying Roman and Byzantine history. History repeats.

Revolution - as in February one - indeed could be in cards but it wasn't exactly expected if I remember my lectures correctly. Bolsheviks putsch on the other hand was just opportunistic takeover as other parties thought that there aren't enemies on the left. If revolution was in cards then putsch was not, even Lenin arrest narrowly stopped/delayed by Vyshinsky could mean that bolsheviks would remain clique of radicals.

(14-01-2016 07:07 AM)Banjo Wrote:  As for America? I again quote Mr Johnson.

"By the subtitle, I really do mean it. This is not just hype to sell books — "The Last Days of the American Republic." I’m here concerned with a very real, concrete problem in political analysis, namely that the political system of the United States today, history tells us, is one of the most unstable combinations there is — that is, domestic democracy and foreign empire — that the choices are stark. A nation can be one or the other, a democracy or an imperialist, but it can’t be both. If it sticks to imperialism, it will, like the old Roman Republic, on which so much of our system was modeled, like the old Roman Republic, it will lose its democracy to a domestic dictatorship.
Chalmers Johnson.

Actually Szuchow, you'd enjoy Chalmers. His books are very good and he has been an advisor to the CIA. He knew what he was talking about. Sadly, most Americans don't really know him as far as I can tell.

I'm enjoying many books, now I plan to see if Thomas Piketty and his Capital in the Twenty-First Century is worth reading. Chalmers also probably will land on my reading list.

As for imperialism it remind me of Jan Sowa Phantom Body of the King.

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

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14-01-2016, 07:28 AM
RE: Comebacks
(14-01-2016 07:17 AM)Szuchow Wrote:  As for imperialism it remind me of Jan Sowa Phantom Body of the King.

I know not of this book.

From what I understand or remember, the Russian soldiers in WWI were so pissed off at how under prepared they were, when they returned home it gave the Bollies a chance to rise up.

Apparently some Russian uniforms still included fur hats! WTF???

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14-01-2016, 07:42 AM
RE: Comebacks
(14-01-2016 07:28 AM)Banjo Wrote:  I know not of this book.

It's not translated from polish. Here is some info about it. Though we talked a little about said book.

(14-01-2016 07:28 AM)Banjo Wrote:  From what I understand or remember, the Russian soldiers in WWI were so pissed off at how under prepared they were, when they returned home it gave the Bollies a chance to rise up.

It's somewhat accurate though simplified view but I understand you do not want to go into specifics.

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

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14-01-2016, 07:55 AM
RE: Comebacks
(14-01-2016 07:42 AM)Szuchow Wrote:  
(14-01-2016 07:28 AM)Banjo Wrote:  I know not of this book.

It's not translated from polish. Here is some info about it. Though we talked a little about said book.

(14-01-2016 07:28 AM)Banjo Wrote:  From what I understand or remember, the Russian soldiers in WWI were so pissed off at how under prepared they were, when they returned home it gave the Bollies a chance to rise up.

It's somewhat accurate though simplified view but I understand you do not want to go into specifics.

Mate these days, especially at night, my mind goes off to Gosford. I'd like to keep it simple anyway. I have not written professionally since the drum magazine I worked for went under after the editor and owner died of cancer.

I have no recollection of talking about that book. That is where my mind is.

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14-01-2016, 08:01 AM
RE: Comebacks
This sounds like a great book. I like this.

Sowa develops this argument following a chronological pattern: Chapter two (pp. 47–108) explains Poland’s economic boom during the nascent capitalist world-economy during the 16th century price revolution and the evolution of “second serfdom” as organizational pattern paving the way to the dominance of the folwark.

And this.
The interesting point of Sowa’s book is his transcendence of modernist theories both of nationalism (such as those of Hroch, Kohn and Anderson) and of economic development. Instead he offers an explanation that conceived the complex multi-layered and multi-faceted process. It is remarkable that he openly reclaims the tradition of Marxist theorems in the current of uneven development, as supported by other scholars in the field[3] thus questioning the all too often automatically accepted link between Marx’ philosophical tradition and communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe

I want to read this book.

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14-01-2016, 08:13 AM
RE: Comebacks
(14-01-2016 07:55 AM)Banjo Wrote:  Mate these days, especially at night, my mind goes off to Gosford. I'd like to keep it simple anyway. I have not written professionally since the drum magazine I worked for went under after the editor and owner died of cancer.

There is no need to make this complicated as it is side subject.

As for writing professionaly I've never done that.

(14-01-2016 07:55 AM)Banjo Wrote:  I have no recollection of talking about that book. That is where my mind is.

It was a short conversation which I only remembered when you mentioned Chalmers book.

(14-01-2016 08:01 AM)Banjo Wrote:  This sounds like a great book. I like this.

Sowa develops this argument following a chronological pattern: Chapter two (pp. 47–108) explains Poland’s economic boom during the nascent capitalist world-economy during the 16th century price revolution and the evolution of “second serfdom” as organizational pattern paving the way to the dominance of the folwark.

And this.
The interesting point of Sowa’s book is his transcendence of modernist theories both of nationalism (such as those of Hroch, Kohn and Anderson) and of economic development. Instead he offers an explanation that conceived the complex multi-layered and multi-faceted process. It is remarkable that he openly reclaims the tradition of Marxist theorems in the current of uneven development, as supported by other scholars in the field[3] thus questioning the all too often automatically accepted link between Marx’ philosophical tradition and communist dictatorship in Eastern Europe

I want to read this book.

It's indeed great book, sadly as far as I'm aware there are no plan for translating it. It's largely unknown in Poland though and when it is known is disliked which is not surprising considering the content robbing Poles of comfort of national myths.

The first revolt is against the supreme tyranny of theology, of the phantom of God. As long as we have a master in heaven, we will be slaves on earth.

Mikhail Bakunin.
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14-01-2016, 08:19 AM
RE: Comebacks
Damn. Sad

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