Concept of Spiritual Dryness
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04-06-2015, 09:23 PM
RE: Concept of Spiritual Dryness
(04-06-2015 09:21 PM)pablo Wrote:  I don't mind the dryness, but the itching is unbearable.

I recommend Godbond Medicated Powder.
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04-06-2015, 09:24 PM
RE: Concept of Spiritual Dryness
(02-06-2015 05:39 PM)Plan 9 from OS Wrote:  Anyways, when you look at this with a new perspective, it actually makes me feel very bad for those who beat themselves up over this. I think this can be closely related to having scruples, which is another concept of people trying harder because they feel that they are never good enough to ever be forgiven by Christ.

I've known many people in life who attempt to exert control through criticism. I'm pretty sure they learnt it from the Bible. And I've known many people who've bought into the design, and let themselves be controlled for the desire to be esteemed in the eyes of others whom they consider holy.
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05-06-2015, 07:00 PM
RE: Concept of Spiritual Dryness
(04-06-2015 10:09 AM)Bucky Ball Wrote:  Actually there's a rather long and large tradition in Western religions (not sure about the East) called "The Dark Night of the Soul". All the big shot mystics talked about it, and John of the Cross wrote a book by that name ... although it's pretty weird. Teresa of Avila talked about it, as well as many other "mytics". I still says it's just "habituation" and their brain stops producing as much beta-endorphins as it used to when they think about and talk to Jebus. But they cook up all kinds of religious BS to explain it.
Yes, exactly. The "dark night of the soul" is the first thing that came to mind when I read the OP and in fact I've heard this more poetic sounding term applied to Mother Theresa's struggle. In the writings about it I've seen, it seems to be treated as a passing phase, to be gotten through, with you supposedly being stronger for it afterwards. And that's about the only way to deal with it. Give the sufferer hope that it's a special grace, that god will use it for good. Once in awhile I suppose the sufferer comes up with a new set of rationalizations, and/or has a new goose-bumpy catharsis and then can carry on in the faith.

Or you could be like Mother Theresa, who never snapped out of it, but at least she kept it swept under the carpet and didn't disturb anyone else's slumber.
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