Corporal Punishment
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23-11-2013, 11:57 AM (This post was last modified: 23-11-2013 12:11 PM by BrokenQuill92.)
RE: Corporal Punishment
That's like saying to a hungry kid who keeps stealing food that after the tenth time your right hand has got to go but will admit the three times in my life I was ever hit kept me from doing any of those things EVER again. But then again the Look was usually enough to reduce me to tears as a kid .

1. Stealing a $5.00 necklace when I was 9

2. Kicking the cat when I was 6

3. Eating a whole mixing bowl of raw cookie dough when I was 3
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23-11-2013, 12:05 PM
RE: Corporal Punishment
(23-11-2013 11:47 AM)bemore Wrote:  Corporal punishment???

Treating a symptom rather than dealing with the problem.

Seriously???

The most extreme punishment, that is the death penalty, is in place in certain parts of the planet. Guess what though, they keep killing people. That to me shows it does not work, will not work and will never work.


Are you claiming there are zombies out there eating people!?Shocking

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23-11-2013, 02:58 PM
RE: Corporal Punishment
(23-11-2013 11:47 AM)bemore Wrote:  Corporal punishment???

Treating a symptom rather than dealing with the problem.

Seriously???

The most extreme punishment, that is the death penalty, is in place in certain parts of the planet. Guess what though, they keep killing people. That to me shows it does not work, will not work and will never work.

If you ask me, any kind of punishment is useless to reduce crime.
I think we're talking bad measures here, not actually trying to find real definitive solutions

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23-11-2013, 03:30 PM
RE: Corporal Punishment
Corporal punishment is not an answer to the problem of crime. In fact our entire prison system, at least in the U.S. does a poor job at deterring crime, and does more to generate criminals than rehabilitate them. In my opinion the only thing useful it does is keep some baddies off the street for a period of time.
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24-11-2013, 07:22 AM
RE: Corporal Punishment
Again, Corporal punishment may be the answer to CERTAIN criminals...I'm against blanket statements like most here saying "Corporal punishment is NEVER the answer", when yes...sometimes it is. The problem is knowing WHO will benefit from the meted out punishment.

Some people need different things to motivate them to not do the crime...some people will go "oh if I do this I'll get 100 lashes, but pfft who cares that won't bother me" and still do the crime, but some people will go "holy shit 100 lashes for assault? i'm never hitting anyone ever again"

Punishment and discipline isn't about human rights, its about what suits the crime, imo once someone commits certain crimes certain rights are waived....giving prison time to violent offenders who will spend life in prison on MY dime is not a solution it's a band aid...rehabilitate them, or show them such a harsh punishment that it will deter them from ever doing it again.

Shock And Awe Tactics-- The "application of massive or overwhelming force" to "disarm, incapacitate, or render the enemy impotent with as few casualties to ourselves and to noncombatants as possible"
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24-11-2013, 09:38 AM
RE: Corporal Punishment
To me the biggest problem with allowing corporal punishment is that so few people believe in following a pragmatic, testable code of morality. For example, when philosophers try to define “morality” the starting point is nearly always reciprocity. Yet, most of the population believes that non-violent “offenses”, like growing pot or having an undisclosed offshore bank account, should be met with extreme violence—being hauled off gunpoint, tased and/or shot if you resist, and locked up in a cell with violent criminals who are likely to beat you. If you point out that this is non-reciprocal and ask the voters what moral code they used to validate this law they passed, invariably you'll find there is none. Of course they'll never admit that they don't follow any moral code, but ask them to define the rule or test they used to determine if these laws are moral and just, and the justification always boils down to “because I think so” or "because god says so".

While I'm opposed to corporal punishment, it wouldn't be so bad if the people making the rules followed a moral code that included reciprocity. Then, the only way a person would get whipped and beaten, is if he initiated comparable violence against someone else (rape, assault, etc.). Thus, when the perpetrator assaults another, he is effectively saying that he believes it's ok to initiate violence against another, and thus giving tacit approval to having violence, such as lashes, initiated against himself. And someone who is non-violent, like the guy growing pot or with the offshore bank account, would never have to worry about being the victim of state violence. But since so few follow any measurable moral code other than “because I think so”, this means if we allow corporal punishment, it will likely end up being used against people who themselves are non-violent, but simply engage in conduct that >51% of the population finds offensive. IMO, it's too dangerous to even consider giving people who don't follow a moral code the power to use corporal punishment; just look at the witch hunts of old, or see what happens in Saudi Arabia where women are stoned for having sex.
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24-11-2013, 02:06 PM
RE: Corporal Punishment
can i chime in again,.... and drop a few thoughts

criminal law...its the seed of this thread.

100 lashes, the stockades, I believe that what the authors of the Constitution and bill of rights has in mind when they penned the bill of rights.

corporal punishment, It would be hard to get it to pass 8th constitutional muster and the 4 point Furman Vs. Georga test. The whole "cruel and unusual" punishment. the "100 lashes" "the stockade" etc are the types of punishment the amendment was written to prohibit.
that a punishment must not by its severity be degrading to human dignity, especially torture. harsh punishment that is obviously inflicted in wholly arbitrary fashion. harsh punishment that is clearly and totally rejected throughout society. harsh punishment that is thoroughly unnecessary.

"Some people need different things to motivate them to not do the crime...some people will go "oh if I do this I'll get 100 lashes, but pfft who cares that won't bother me" and still do the crime, but some people will go "holy shit 100 lashes for assault? i'm never hitting anyone ever again" sounds good, but i think the reality is "....pfft who cares that wont bother me,...i just hire a good lawyer." the reality is if you can afford a good lawyer or appeal to a cause you can buy yourself a lighter sentence. Many say OJ bought his verdict with a legal dream team. Many say that mr Zimmerman who shot Trayvon was the right guy to appeal to a political though. In its essence criminal law is less about ethics and more about meeting elements of a legal definition within a judicial precedent and a good lawyer

you don't need to hit someone to be charged with assault. Just instilling a reasonable fear of being striked in a unwanted or harmful way.
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25-11-2013, 08:56 AM
RE: Corporal Punishment
How do you plan on fixing violent criminals without harsh punishment? Prison time is NOT a harsh punishment...it's free medical care, free food, and a free hot bed.

Also, please tell me, do you think a murderer cares about Human dignity while killing their victims? You are not going to fix anything by basically putting them in the adult version of time out.

Shock And Awe Tactics-- The "application of massive or overwhelming force" to "disarm, incapacitate, or render the enemy impotent with as few casualties to ourselves and to noncombatants as possible"
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25-11-2013, 10:48 AM
RE: Corporal Punishment
(25-11-2013 08:56 AM)Likos02 Wrote:  How do you plan on fixing violent criminals without harsh punishment? Prison time is NOT a harsh punishment...it's free medical care, free food, and a free hot bed.

Also, please tell me, do you think a murderer cares about Human dignity while killing their victims? You are not going to fix anything by basically putting them in the adult version of time out.

Norway has the worlds "softest" prison system and the lowest rate of re-incarceration. So rehabilitation is much preferable to barbarity it is cheaper when considering the fact that once these guys have finished their sentence they move on to have productive lives. Harsh Punishments DO NOT WORK rehabilitation does.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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25-11-2013, 11:41 AM
RE: Corporal Punishment



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