Crosses
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26-01-2014, 12:40 PM
RE: Crosses
Governments spare no expense for the torture rituals of the day.

On average, ...in 2008 (the cost of) incarcerating one inmate... (was) on average, $29,000 a year.

Cost of Lock Up Americans

I'm sure burning witches, crucifying Christians, operating Black Ops Prisons is well within the budget of most any government interested in the undertaking (creepy pun intended)
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26-01-2014, 12:55 PM
RE: Crosses
Thats why Vlad the Impaler just shoved a sharp stick up everyones ass, cheaper than a cross. Smartass
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28-01-2014, 01:10 AM
RE: Crosses
(26-01-2014 06:49 AM)Free Thought Wrote:  
(23-01-2014 06:54 PM)BrokenQuill92 Wrote:  When crucifixions still took place why would they spend money on wood, an expensive commodity using it to nail up criminals?

It wasn't a cost issue, not like wood and iron nails were ever pricy to anybody not a peasant anyway...

Crucifixion was, on paper, a method of torture execution; in theory those unlucky enough to be condemned to a crucifix were effectively to be tortured to death very slowly. Where's the fun in killing if you don't make it as slow and painful as possible, eh ancient peoples of the world?

Of course this probably wasn't the practise, chances are guards would 'help' hasten the death through stabbing or smashing the victim so they could go on with their day.

Point is; it was cheap, slow and painful, perfect for teaching the locals a few lessons.

Long time ago I read an in-depth discussion about crucifixion, I wish I knew where it was and could find it. I think it even predates my internet daze. It pointed out that death from just crucifixion was asphyxiation caused by exhaustion, and could take several days. It was said that, when a person is suspended by their arms, it causes the very act of breathing to become strenuous -- the victim is literally left fighting to breathe. But it took a long time. The "piercing of the side" in the Babble was a euphemism for disembowelment. Once the vic is eviscerated and his/her bowels are hanging down to the ground, the diaphragm collapsed and the vic asphyxiates quickly, because s/he can't breathe at all. Crucifixion was reserved for the poor and some others, it said, and the wealthy, if to be executed, would be beheaded or something else, IIRC.

Wish I could find that reference again, dangit...

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28-01-2014, 01:18 AM
RE: Crosses
The Romans had a really reallly really really weird releationship with executions.

Roman citizens where forbidden to be crucified and were instead either decapitated or thrown off a cliff near the city of Rome.
Non Roman citizens were crucified and slaves....... well, one could say that slaves were on the bottom of that pyramide and that their exicution ws done through methods creating the greatest most possible pain.

Executions in Rome were differentiated between class in society and were therefor almoust always different and sometimes symbolic.

(22-05-2014 06:23 PM)Jeremy E Walker Wrote:  I abstain from all forms of sexual acts.
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28-01-2014, 03:47 AM
RE: Crosses
Thor had a hammer, Jesus was nailed... Do I need to spell it out?

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28-01-2014, 12:27 PM
RE: Crosses
(28-01-2014 03:47 AM)Phil Hill Wrote:  Thor had a hammer, Jesus was nailed... Do I need to spell it out?

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06-02-2014, 06:57 PM
RE: Crosses
Like The Germans are coming said, executions were symbolic. (Nitpick, the cliff was more specifically for treason, not that it's important to this conversation.) A painful public execution like crucifixion was also seen as a way to deter further crime, the same way people today argue that the death penalty deters crime but with the added bonus of people being able to see exactly how painful and degrading the punishment would be if they stepped out of line.

As far as wood being super expensive, remember that this is Rome we're talking about. Yeah, Judea might not have had a lot of trees (at least, not a lot that were suitable for this particular task) but Rome was all about moving resources from one area to another. By this point they had a lot of land north of the Alps, including Gaul, which at that time was mostly forest. Importing some wood for the valuable purpose of deterring crime (or even just reusing wood from other projects) wouldn't have been too prohibitive for the culture that saw the Mediterranean as their personal pond.
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07-02-2014, 12:32 PM
RE: Crosses
(23-01-2014 06:54 PM)BrokenQuill92 Wrote:  When crucifixions still took place why would they spend money on wood, an expensive commodity using it to nail up criminals?

No, wood beams were relatively available at the time of the roman empire and lumber was relatively inexpensive. The nails used were standard Roman military nails which were quite common throughout the empire. They may have reused the crux simplex, the upright post and the patibulum, the crossbeam, in multiple executions. Seneca states there was a section outside the eastern gate of Rome reserved specifically for the execution of slaves by crucifixion.

Remember that crucifixion was a dramatic use of public terror, primarily employed in the outer edges of the empire to crush out dissent. Usually the criminal was whipped using a roman scorpion until his flesh was torn from his back. He then had to carry the crossbeam to the execution site in full public display. It could take 2-4 days to die on a cross, depending of the doomed man's strength, blood loss, and resiliance to the torture. Usually the bodies were left to rot of the crosses as a warning to other rebels with delusions of contesting Ceasar.

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