Dealing with depression
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16-07-2013, 12:59 PM
Dealing with depression
So.. I'm new to this forum, and I didn't sign up here for mental support Tongue. But before I go into apologizing in advance, I will just try to avoid it as a smart means of self-therapy Wink.

As I've spent my time with reading a lot on this forum recently (probably more than I should've), it seems that talking about this won't be too much out of place, since many of you have gone through similar problems.

Anyway, I finished school in June and moved out of my mom's house into a shared appartment with people who already study at university, here, at a town where I actually grew up for the first 13 years of my life (had to live in Bavaria until recently Dodgy ). While my roommates desperately await semester break, I can't stand the fact that I have more than 2 1/2 months of nothing to do now...

I know, to 'normal' people, that sounds amazing. The thing is, this 'void' is triggering my depression and social anxiety again. Luckily, my roommates are very, very nice people, so after 2 weeks of living here now, I don't avoid them on purpose anymore. The more severe problem is being without any motivation and power to do anything outside the house. If I wouldn't love food that much, I probably wouldn't even go grocery shopping.

I've been in therapy for most of my life, I've been taught techniques to deal with that stuff by several therapists, but... well those techniques require incentives, too. And I'm not on medicine right now. I've taken SSRI in the past, but, besides not really noticing much differences, I'm always afraid that my... concentration and knowledge input might suffer, which I don't want to deal with during Uni. Another thing I've noticed is, that this 'falling into a hole of lethargy' thing happens to me a lot in summer. And the heat is not really helping with pushing me to do anything...

Anyone with similar problems? Advice? Should I begin a whole new therapy again, take medicine, sit this 'episode' out or continue trying to fight it with self-imposed activities? Or all of those?

I know, in the end it's my decision, I just want to hear some advice Smile.

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16-07-2013, 05:04 PM
RE: Dealing with depression
All of those.

More detailed though, you mention the lack of incentive. While certain brands of anti-depressants can help with that to some degree and depending on the individual, it more comes down to when the person hits their description of the absolute low point in their life (at least currently). That is when incentive is created in the strongest way.

I am not bad mouthing anti-depressants, but I do prefer looking elsewhere first. I have had more success with people that way, but that is just my experience and should be taken with a grain of salt.

That being said though, it is obviously best to avoid hitting that low due to the extreme risk it can cause if the person doesn't go on an upward swing. If you are able to force yourself out of the house to do simple things, like walk to the store, or ride a bike on a trail for 15-30 minutes, you will gain a large amount of motivation in other things you do. As a result from the endorphins from the exercise, you will be more open even when you are a socially shy person. Of course it will reduce stress and can help with body image (even when you are already in good shape, more relating to confidence).

One topic that tends to make some people uncomfortable is masturbation and/or sex. If you are currently in a sexually active relationship then it's very helpful to have a healthy sex life. If you are currently single, masturbation is also very helpful. A feel good situation with improved mental state and stress reduction. That is, of course, as long as it is within healthy bounds. More than likely, masturbating 6 times a day or more is a bit much for most people.

Last thing I would mention, is that I am a strong proponent of counseling. I wish everyone had a counselor. The reason being is quite simple, it is a good place to go to where you won't be judged on any topic, so you are free to discuss things as you see them instead of modifying your opinion to prevent conflict with others. They can also help with making you responsible to someone, so when you set goals with them you are much more inclined to follow through.

A good relationship with a counselor will result in them suggesting things for you to try, but always making sure it is something you are okay with doing while still pushing your boundaries a little bit. This trust and solid relationship that is built with a counselor is extremely helpful, and I fully believe it would help you as well. However it is not a quick fix. Trust in them takes time, and is best if for a while in the beginning you focus on your history. AKA let them know about who you are, and who they are to make sure it will be a good fit.

That was probably unnecessarily long, but I have been studying psychology and sociology for too long and as a result I am compelled to jump in on these kind of threads when I see them.

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17-07-2013, 06:08 AM
RE: Dealing with depression
Since counselling isn't really a 'thing' in germany, that might be difficult. However, psychologists do pretty much the same, so I'll try to find one I guess, and hope I don't have to wait months for an appointment Undecided . I have had contact to psychologists over extended periods of time, I know it can be very helpful to have someone neutral and professional to talk to.

Forcing myself into doing something is hard right now, but I hope it gets better. There are some nice places to go walking or even hike around here, I remember how I loved it as a child, so I will try to make use of nostalgia and curiosity about how things changed around here and get into that Smile.

Your reply was definitely not 'unnecessarily long' Smile
Thank you very much

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17-07-2013, 11:45 AM
RE: Dealing with depression
I'm sorry to hear that.

What do you think the root cause of your depression is?

And how was your childhood?
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17-07-2013, 12:36 PM
RE: Dealing with depression
Well since my childhood was fine until these problems arose (I was probably around 12 years old), I can't trace my issues back to early childhood trauma or bad parenting. I guess for me it's really just genetic. Social anxiety was first to give me trouble in daily life (school mostly), I think it just went down a vicious circle - depression and anxiety complement each other perfectly.

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17-07-2013, 05:37 PM
RE: Dealing with depression
(17-07-2013 12:36 PM)Taro Wrote:  Well since my childhood was fine until these problems arose (I was probably around 12 years old), I can't trace my issues back to early childhood trauma or bad parenting. I guess for me it's really just genetic. Social anxiety was first to give me trouble in daily life (school mostly), I think it just went down a vicious circle - depression and anxiety complement each other perfectly.

How do you know it is genetic? Evidence for genetic depression is very hazy, what has been found is that no one is born with any particular dysfunctional behaviour, but people have different 'trigger points', some are much more susceptible to dysfunctional behaviour than others, but even so, they need to of been abused or experienced trauma to activate that behaviour in the first place.

A baby never loses it's nerve or thinks 'I'm fed up with my life'.

9/10 psychiatrists say that childhood experience is the biggest predictor of adult behaviour.

(17-07-2013 12:36 PM)Taro Wrote:  Social anxiety was first to give me trouble in daily life (school mostly), I think it just went down a vicious circle - depression and anxiety complement each other perfectly.

Yeah, school is probably one of the worst places. Schools seem to foster depression like no other.

Worth listening to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfB3dcMzxPo
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17-07-2013, 05:58 PM
RE: Dealing with depression
(17-07-2013 05:37 PM)Koolay Wrote:  9/10 psychiatrists say that childhood experience is the biggest predictor of adult behaviour.

[citation needed]

Also, behavior=/=mood.
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17-07-2013, 06:00 PM
RE: Dealing with depression
(17-07-2013 05:58 PM)amyb Wrote:  Also, behavior=/=mood.

Are you saying depression is not behaviour?
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17-07-2013, 06:02 PM
RE: Dealing with depression
This is a support forum...any debating re: clinical data, etc. that isn't a part of a discussion with the OP should probably be moved to the main forum.

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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17-07-2013, 06:03 PM (This post was last modified: 17-07-2013 06:09 PM by amyb.)
RE: Dealing with depression
(17-07-2013 06:00 PM)Coolio Wrote:  
(17-07-2013 05:58 PM)amyb Wrote:  Also, behavior=/=mood.

Are you saying depression is not behaviour?

Correct.
Behavior:
1. The way in which one acts or conducts oneself, esp. toward others: "his insulting behavior towards me".
2. The way in which an animal or person acts in response to a particular situation or stimulus: "the feeding behavior of predators".

Depression is how you feel, not how you act.

Depression
1. Severe despondency and dejection, accompanied by feelings of hopelessness and inadequacy.
2. A condition of mental disturbance, typically with lack of energy and difficulty in maintaining concentration or interest in life.
taro Wrote:Anyone with similar problems? Advice? Should I begin a whole new therapy again, take medicine, sit this 'episode' out or continue trying to fight it with self-imposed activities? Or all of those?
If you think therapy would help, that's what I'd do. That's what I am doing, in fact (for bipolar and SPD). Though it's always worthwhile to try doing new things, filling your time, etc., before trying more meds, because side effects.
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