Declining "respect" for religion
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
26-06-2012, 10:00 PM
Declining "respect" for religion
Some choice quotes from this article on the Religious Right and their fight to protect their "rights to religious freedom." Indeed, should the religious faithful be allowed to demand that we respect their belief in fairy tales? I don't think respect for beliefs should be tacitly implied, let alone demanded. What do others think? Discuss.

Quote:In the writings and speeches of Catholic bishops and evangelical leaders
in recent months, "religious freedom" has come to mean something close
to its opposite. It now stands for "religious privilege". It is a coded
way for them to state their demand that religious institutions should be
allowed special powers that exempt them from the laws of the land.

But Catholic University of America President John Garvey, at an address to the bishops intended to kick off the "Fortnight for Freedom", listed the National Labor Relations Board decision as a grievous example of the "decline in respect for religious freedom".

In other words, rather than being a guarantee of your freedom to
worship, religious liberty is the power to rewrite laws that offend you –
such as laws designed to protect the health of working women.

Archbishop Gomez seems to think that religious freedom is some kind of
privilege that you get from the state in exchange for signing up for a
particular faith.

Manifest Insanity @ Amazon
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-06-2012, 10:08 PM
RE: Declining "respect" for religion
Respect is earned, not demanded.
You have my respect until you do something to lose that respect.
And religion lost my respect fucking ages ago.

[Image: 3cdac7eec8f6b059070d9df56f50a7ae.jpg]
Now with 40% more awesome.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like earmuffs's post
26-06-2012, 10:10 PM
RE: Declining "respect" for religion
The article points out that there's a different between religious freedom and religious privilege. I think any country that offers religious freedom as part of its laws (such as the US with the first amendment) should guarantee the religious freedom that its laws promise, but of course not religious privilege.

The article is interesting, but strikes of fear-mongering. The court case mentioned fell in favor of the oppressed and against the church, and the rest of the religious groups' actions were just complaining. So what's the worry? The US has not yet allowed the Catholic church to "abuse" religious freedom as the title suggests, but only to allow them to complain about the fact that they're not being given the chance.

I think the debate over contraception was stupid. The Catholic church wants to make it sound like it was a moral argument, but it's a financial one. Employees who would be offered contraception through insurance companies are currently being offered contraception through cash purchase, and that cash comes from the church (in any instance that would be relevant to "insurance via church"). The Catholic church isn't being forced to "provide" contraception any more than they were when all they gave their employees was cash. The change isn't in the Catholic church's role as provider but merely a change in the currency used to buy contraception. But as worrisome as this topic was when it was introduced, it doesn't look like the Catholic church got to abuse their religious freedom in this case, either.

My girlfriend is mad at me. Perhaps I shouldn't have tried cooking a stick in her non-stick pan.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-06-2012, 10:19 PM
RE: Declining "respect" for religion
Unfortunately, the religious institutions have conflated freedom with privilege, and then demand that we respect their beliefs, that we should be hands-off. To some extent, this is acceptable: that they are free to believe whatever they want, but they cannot demand that others respect their rights to do so and refrain from commenting or critiquing out of some ethereal policy that they are entitled to this unwritten rule.

On a related matter, Germany made it illegal for parents to circumcise their children for religious reasons. Of course, certain segments are up in arms that this violates their religious rights.

Manifest Insanity @ Amazon
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Diogenes of Mayberry's post
27-06-2012, 03:42 PM
RE: Declining "respect" for religion
Respect for "Religious Freedom" is not the same as capitulation to the "Religious Belief" of some by the many.
Religious freedom is freedom to believe whatever you want. I am completely for freedom of thought. No thought police for me.
But, the problem with religious belief is as Christopher Hitchens said, "Religion poisons everything", (including government).
The Catholics can go pound sand.

The old gods are dead, let's invent some new ones before something really bad happens.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Thomas's post
27-06-2012, 05:02 PM
RE: Declining "respect" for religion
As long as the religion doesn't become a danger to ones self or other people, and as long as those beliefs are practiced and not forced into law, it's fine with me.

But when it crosses that line, then it shouldn't be respected.

Member of the Cult of Reason

The atheist is a man who destroys the imaginary things which afflict the human race, and so leads men back to nature, to experience and to reason.
-Baron d'Holbach-
Bitcion:1DNeQMswMdvx4xLPP6qNE7RkeTwXGC7Bzp
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like fstratzero's post
27-06-2012, 08:40 PM
RE: Declining "respect" for religion
I recalled two articles which speak to this topic and have some interesting insights.

The first from Randy Cohen of the New York Times, whose point in this article, "Can We Talk About Religion, Please?" I quoted in my book.
Quote: Etiquette holds that religion, especially another person’s religion, should be treated with deference or, better still, silence by nonbelievers. . . . Nevertheless, we should stop talking about religious matters only in
diffident whispers, and the observant should stop expecting us to do so.


The second from renowned British Philosophy professor, A.C. Grayling in this article.
Quote: It's only in the past decade that these three strands of thought have developed into a public campaign against faith – but it wasn't the atheists, according to Grayling, who provoked the confrontation. "The reason why it's become a big issue is that religions have turned the volume up, because they're on the back foot. The hold of religion is weakening, definitely, and diminishing in numbers. The reason why there's such a furore about it is that the cornered animal, the loser, starts making a big noise."
Quote: "Well, firstly, I think the charges of militancy and fundamentalism of course come from our opponents, the theists. My rejoinder is to say when the boot was on their foot they burned us at the stake. All we're doing is speaking very frankly and bluntly and they don't like it," he laughs. "So we speak frankly and bluntly, and the respect agenda is now gone, they can no longer float behind the diaphanous veil – 'Ooh, I have faith so you mustn't offend me'. So they don't like the blunt talking. But we're not burning them at the stake. They've got to remember that when it was the other way around it was a much more serious matter."

Manifest Insanity @ Amazon
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: