Deepest ocean in universe
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13-06-2013, 05:00 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
bullshit like your sig lol and what I wrote was typo - i mean feet
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13-06-2013, 05:16 PM (This post was last modified: 13-06-2013 06:18 PM by Chas.)
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 05:00 PM)Korin Wrote:  bullshit like your sig lol and what I wrote was typo - i mean feet

Huh What in my signature is bullshit?

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13-06-2013, 05:58 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 09:06 AM)Korin Wrote:  Known solar system biggest is probably Europa but I doubt in whole universe. I say there is ocean out there that is 100,000 feet miles deep.

We barely know shit when it comes to the "whole universe." Hell, I'm not even sure if we have gotten any promising leads yet when it comes to another celestial body containing water (other than Europa).

You asked for us to provide an answer to a question where the answer can't be provided. When you were informed of this, now you state your bet about their being an ocean 100,000 feet deep somewhere out there.....because you like the idea. This is clearly a topic that intrigues you, but right now you are limited to your imagination rather than evidence. The deepest ocean in the universe that WE KNOW OF is the Pacific Ocean, not some ocean that is 100,000 feet deep. Our knowledge of the universe at large is minuscule and you will just have to deal with that.

And frankly, I'm not sure it's even possible for an ocean that deep to exist.

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13-06-2013, 06:22 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 05:58 PM)Tartarus Sauce Wrote:  And frankly, I'm not sure it's even possible for an ocean that deep to exist.

That's actually a very interesting question. There are a number of real constraints on how deep an ocean can be.

After all - an ocean is liquid water. So, what depth of liquid water can exist on the surface of a planet? The immense pressure of the rest of the ocean above it means that the bottom of a stack of water is almost certain to be liquid on a terrestrial planet (but it'd all be frozen farther out, like a comet). The question then is how high can it get before pressure dictates it becomes vapour? I'm lazy so I'll consider the triple point (the lowest possible pressure at which liquid water can exist). For Earth, the atmospheric pressure reaches the triple point at, well, pretty much the edge of the atmosphere. Of course, that much water would evaporate like mad when it was in the sun, so there'd be a lot of pressure fluctuations. Depth would depend on time of day... not to mention the tides! The limit may be sufficiently high that it's the point where evaporation is lost to space (there basically is no atmosphere). Alternatively, the max depth might be determined by the 'height' at which water would freeze (if temperature drops faster than pressure) - as on Europa.

Anyway, you get the idea. It's possible to calculate (there is a maximum for any given planet), but I'm certainly too lazy to do it with any rigour.
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13-06-2013, 06:28 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 05:58 PM)Tartarus Sauce Wrote:  And frankly, I'm not sure it's even possible for an ocean that deep to exist.

According to these guys (http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/q...ion/2754/) at about 20 Kilometers of depth water is compressed into ice(well ice IV really) at room temperature so really you can't get an ocean of water that is much deeper than that (varying of course by temperature and atmospheric pressure).

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13-06-2013, 06:40 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 06:28 PM)ridethespiral Wrote:  According to these guys (http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/q...ion/2754/) at about 20 Kilometers of depth water is compressed into ice(well ice IV really) at room temperature so really you can't get an ocean of water that is much deeper than that (varying of course by temperature and atmospheric pressure).

That's a good point. I was assuming the bottom would stay liquid. Which is not actually a very good assumption, since cooler water is denser, and therefore once sufficient pressure is reached due to column height it will compress into various forms of exotic ice.

It'd be different, of course, if there was some sort of heating mechanism at the bottom. Either very high levels of geological activity or very powerful tides might do it.
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13-06-2013, 06:46 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 06:40 PM)cjlr Wrote:  
(13-06-2013 06:28 PM)ridethespiral Wrote:  According to these guys (http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/q...ion/2754/) at about 20 Kilometers of depth water is compressed into ice(well ice IV really) at room temperature so really you can't get an ocean of water that is much deeper than that (varying of course by temperature and atmospheric pressure).

That's a good point. I was assuming the bottom would stay liquid. Which is not actually a very good assumption, since cooler water is denser, and therefore once sufficient pressure is reached due to column height it will compress into various forms of exotic ice.

It'd be different, of course, if there was some sort of heating mechanism at the bottom. Either very high levels of geological activity or very powerful tides might do it.

No, water is nearly incompressible and the phase is more sensitive to temperature than to pressure.

[Image: bwater_H2Ophase.gif]

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13-06-2013, 06:47 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 06:46 PM)Chas Wrote:  No, water is nearly incompressible and the phase is more sensitive to temperature than to pressure.

[Image: bwater_H2Ophase.gif]

Generally incompressible, yes. But at sufficient pressure it does undergo a phase change.

[Image: Phase_diagram_of_water.svg]
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13-06-2013, 06:55 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 06:47 PM)cjlr Wrote:  
(13-06-2013 06:46 PM)Chas Wrote:  No, water is nearly incompressible and the phase is more sensitive to temperature than to pressure.

[Image: bwater_H2Ophase.gif]

Generally incompressible, yes. But at sufficient pressure it does undergo a phase change.

[Image: Phase_diagram_of_water.svg]

But at those pressures, you no longer have an ocean - you have an ice age.

The important point is to notice how nearly vertical the line that marks the solid/liquid boundary is. The slope of that line is proportional to the compressibility.
At a given small range of temperature, pressure makes almost no difference. A liquid ocean would not have ice at the bottom except in a very narrow range of conditions.

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13-06-2013, 07:16 PM
RE: Deepest ocean in universe
(13-06-2013 06:55 PM)Chas Wrote:  But at those pressures, you no longer have an ocean - you have an ice age.

The important point is to notice how nearly vertical the line that marks the solid/liquid boundary is. The slope of that line is proportional to the compressibility.
At a given small range of temperature, pressure makes almost no difference. A liquid ocean would not have ice at the bottom except in a very narrow range of conditions.

Yes - until you have sufficiently high pressure. Such as a very tall water column would create (allowing for the remainder, above that point, to remain liquid).

It's a limited set of circumstances, sure - but the question is what's possible, not what's likely Big Grin.
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