Disability and the Modern World
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30-08-2013, 10:54 AM
Disability and the Modern World
Disability and the Modern World

May I just ask one simple question: What do sighted people think I do all day? Im honestly curious as what sighted people think my life consist of, because they always seem genuinely surprised that i do all the perfectly ordinary things. Why the so much surprise? Other than not having sight I'm your average anime loving, bookworm, shopacholic. Here are a list of ludicrous questions I get on a daily basis.

How come you don't bump into stuff like on tv? (Really people?)

How do you clean your house?

How did you cook all this without burning yourself?

How do use a phone?

How are you using a computer? (I've had many people online insist that blind people can't use a computer)

How do you paint? (I'm an artist)

What do you mean watch tv?

What do you mean  you like reading? 

How did you get your clothes to match?
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30-08-2013, 02:31 PM (This post was last modified: 30-08-2013 03:04 PM by Luminon.)
RE: Disability and the Modern World
Good question. Somewhere I heard that a blind person can get so skilled at doing things, that he can do almost anything, except driving a car. But I understand you're new at this.
And I am terrified that I'll say something insensitive and all I can think of are insensitive jokes. I've used some very black humor through difficult times in my life and it helped me to hit the rock bottom and start climbing up. Black... humor. See? I'm really not doing this on purpose. I've got myself a dirty, dirty mind.

OK, so about you... I suppose you use some workarounds that most people would never think of and then you use lots of common sense - like remembering where everything is or having someone to help, mark clothes for you and stuff. I'd bet there are many good-willed Christians in your area to help you out. [sarcasm]

As for what you do all day, probably the same as me, I'm embarrassed to admit. Often I just use Balabolka to convert some documents into voice and listen to them on my player. The computer is a must. I meditate a lot. Kind of a modern monk life. Except you maybe go out to have a drink with some friends, I suppose. Yes, and you watch TV.
I suppose you also don't cook every day, you make sure you're stocked for more days and then you just warm it up.

I'd just want to ask you, what do you feel about political correctness?
Disability sucks. I had an uncle, who used to ride a motorbike. Got himself into an accident, walked away and even repaired the bike the next day. The day after that he never walked again, because his neck spine was broken, in the first place. So he ended up almost completely paralyzed, had only mobility in his head and limited use of his left hand. He was a very proud man and life in a medical institution was not for him, he would surely commit suicide. Luckily my aunt married him and took care for him for 20 years. We kids used to play chess with him, go fishing and so on. He also went shopping by himself, just asked shop attendant what to put into the bag on the electric wheelchair. He doesn't live anymore, died on kidney failure years ago. I think he used to scrape his teeth a lot when he wanted something but couldn't get it, he was totally dependent on his nurse and later his wife. I don't know how a proud person can handle this and when I think of it, people who learn to live with a disability deserve a lot of respect. If we respect sportsmen and athletes who train in completely arbitrary disciplines, we might as well respect those who work on the discipline of normal life.

And also, what do you think about ultrasound cane devices?
The ultracane is closest to a normal cane, it detects things on short and long distance by ultrasound and lets you know about them by vibrating buttons in the handle, meanwhile it works like a real cane, which means it's a white stick that you hold and tap around and that helps other people to see that you're blind.
As opposed to the other device, which is unfortunately just a design concept. The Eye stick is an ultrasound flashlight that gives you sound signals via a bluetooth ear piece. It could also do some nifty tricks, like scanning and reading aloud written text, scanning barcodes and identifying money.
It would have the vibration signal as well, but as I said, the earpiece occupies one ear. It also looks like a flashlight, not a stick, so if you go out at night, people might think you're going to break into their house and the dark glasses are just for the style.
Frankly, I have no idea how do the dogs feel about all this ultrasound.
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30-08-2013, 03:34 PM
RE: Disability and the Modern World
I don't know much about the ultra cane but it sounds more like a low vision tool . It seems to me a vibrating cane would mess up navigation. A cane is supposed be like an exstention of yourself. There are lots of low vision people who use a white. It's actually rare that anyone is completely blind.

As for sunglasses they are case by case b basis. Some people use them because they may have had an injury that they want to cover up, or they like people staring at their eye condition (clouded/cataract etc). Other may still have some light perception but light may be painful. And of course just to look cool.
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30-08-2013, 03:45 PM
RE: Disability and the Modern World
(30-08-2013 02:31 PM)Luminon Wrote:  Good question. Somewhere I heard that a blind person can get so skilled at doing things, that he can do almost anything, except driving a car. But I understand you're new at this.
And I am terrified that I'll say something insensitive and all I can think of are insensitive jokes. I've used some very black humor through difficult times in my life and it helped me to hit the rock bottom and start climbing up. Black... humor. See? I'm really not doing this on purpose. I've got myself a dirty, dirty mind.

OK, so about you... I suppose you use some workarounds that most people would never think of and then you use lots of common sense - like remembering where everything is or having someone to help, mark clothes for you and stuff. I'd bet there are many good-willed Christians in your area to help you out. [sarcasm]

As for what you do all day, probably the same as me, I'm embarrassed to admit. Often I just use Balabolka to convert some documents into voice and listen to them on my player. The computer is a must. I meditate a lot. Kind of a modern monk life. Except you maybe go out to have a drink with some friends, I suppose. Yes, and you watch TV.
I suppose you also don't cook every day, you make sure you're stocked for more days and then you just warm it up.

I'd just want to ask you, what do you feel about political correctness?
Disability sucks. I had an uncle, who used to ride a motorbike. Got himself into an accident, walked away and even repaired the bike the next day. The day after that he never walked again, because his neck spine was broken, in the first place. So he ended up almost completely paralyzed, had only mobility in his head and limited use of his left hand. He was a very proud man and life in a medical institution was not for him, he would surely commit suicide. Luckily my aunt married him and took care for him for 20 years. We kids used to play chess with him, go fishing and so on. He also went shopping by himself, just asked shop attendant what to put into the bag on the electric wheelchair. He doesn't live anymore, died on kidney failure years ago. I think he used to scrape his teeth a lot when he wanted something but couldn't get it, he was totally dependent on his nurse and later his wife. I don't know how a proud person can handle this and when I think of it, people who learn to live with a disability deserve a lot of respect. If we respect sportsmen and athletes who train in completely arbitrary disciplines, we might as well respect those who work on the discipline of normal life.

And also, what do you think about ultrasound cane devices?
The ultracane is closest to a normal cane, it detects things on short and long distance by ultrasound and lets you know about them by vibrating buttons in the handle, meanwhile it works like a real cane, which means it's a white stick that you hold and tap around and that helps other people to see that you're blind.
As opposed to the other device, which is unfortunately just a design concept. The Eye stick is an ultrasound flashlight that gives you sound signals via a bluetooth ear piece. It could also do some nifty tricks, like scanning and reading aloud written text, scanning barcodes and identifying money.
It would have the vibration signal as well, but as I said, the earpiece occupies one ear. It also looks like a flashlight, not a stick, so if you go out at night, people might think you're going to break into their house and the dark glasses are just for the style.
Frankly, I have no idea how do the dogs feel about all this ultrasound.

As for pc language I am fine with blind, disabled, or visually impaired

Handicapped and cripple are very rude, I don't really approve of the word retarded but I've heard developmentally disabled call each other so whatever.
Oh and most guide owners don't need a cane. They have much better mobility than cane users, they could probably go without the dog but it's just a precaution.
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30-08-2013, 04:56 PM
RE: Disability and the Modern World
BrokenQuill92, for some of the years I lived in Oakland CA I would get off the bus near my home at the same time as a blind woman. I would ask her if she would let me guide her across the street, she would always accept (it was the crossing of Grand Ave. at Perkins St., if you know Oakland, a busy and somewhat dangerous street crossing). I made the gesture not out of sympathy or any other emotion, I just thought that as a sighted person I could remove some risk. I maybe even wanted to hit on her.

I knew from her dress and the way she carried herself she had a decent job and she could take care of herself. She gave no outward signs of being disabled other than blind, she was obviously competent.

You have demonstrated here that you may be sight impaired but you are a very competent person. Those who assume some level of disability other than sight are those making the mistake. Take that knowledge with you wherever you go.
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30-08-2013, 05:08 PM
RE: Disability and the Modern World
(30-08-2013 04:56 PM)JAH Wrote:  BrokenQuill92, for some of the years I lived in Oakland CA I would get off the bus near my home at the same time as a blind woman. I would ask her if she would let me guide her across the street, she would always accept (it was the crossing of Grand Ave. at Perkins St., if you know Oakland, a busy and somewhat dangerous street crossing). I made the gesture not out of sympathy or any other emotion, I just thought that as a sighted person I could remove some risk. I maybe even wanted to hit on her.

I knew from her dress and the way she carried herself she had a decent job and she could take care of herself. She gave no outward signs of being disabled other than blind, she was obviously competent.

You have demonstrated here that you may be sight impaired but you are a very competent person. Those who assume some level of disability other than sight are those making the mistake. Take that knowledge with you wherever you go.
I just honestly wonder what people think I do with my time. I'm just fascinated that people who are surprised by my perceived normalcy. I really truly wish I knew what the imagined my life was like.
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30-08-2013, 06:03 PM
RE: Disability and the Modern World
I have relatives that lost their sight along the way to RP. My aunt's vision declined to the point of legal blindness when she was about your age BQ. She married a sailor, cooked, took care of their homes on various naval bases, had and raised a son often alone due to the military life, and does most everything anyone else does except drive.

My favorite thing about her is that if you need directions to get somewhere, you get them from her and not from my uncle.

She is in her 70s now, she has never used a cane or had a guide dog. She does have some gadgets around the house to help her out like a clock (that must be decades old) that she can press and it tells her the time.

Her cousin started and ran a methadone clinic in NYC years ago and his vision declined earlier than her's did.

What do I think you do? You live your life.

I'm not anti-social. I'm pro-solitude. Sleepy
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30-08-2013, 06:19 PM (This post was last modified: 30-08-2013 06:24 PM by Luminon.)
RE: Disability and the Modern World
I'm probably not the best person to ask for a perspective, I don't really know what people normally do. I can see them going about their business, but I don't share their feelings for it. It's all based on emotions and I don't have enough of these to waste. Stuff like a gooseling attachment instinct to the first soccer club it sees after hatching.

Doctor Tony Attwood says, that Asperger's is as severe disability as being blind or missing both legs, in its effect on life style. I shaved off quite some points on tests, but mostly by not doing things I know I can't, learning what are these things.

The things you do must also depend on social blindness, not just visual blindness. Depends on what sort of person you are. Are you a philosopher, who spends most of time in one's mind, weaving the mind-stuff fabric that institutions and public corporations are made of? Or do you prefer crocheting an actual cloth with your hands?
Do you enjoy company of other people? Do you have any friends? I mean, you can have quite a social life if you hack the system in such a way, just hypothetically, that hanging out with you will count for some students as extra-curricular activities, or church charity. Walking around and doing things with headset on wifi and Skype dialled to the TTA forum chat is a good idea too. Or combining it with some exercise machine. How am I doing the guessing so far?
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30-08-2013, 07:12 PM
RE: Disability and the Modern World
I wanna know how that lady won Master Chef without sight (I didn't see the season)... The sighted people cut themselves and burn themselves constantly.

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30-08-2013, 07:18 PM
RE: Disability and the Modern World
(30-08-2013 07:12 PM)ridethespiral Wrote:  I wanna know how that lady won Master Chef without sight (I didn't see the season)... The sighted people cut themselves and burn themselves constantly.

Hey I'm an artist not a chef
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