Do religious people ever just weird you out?
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19-08-2015, 08:02 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
I've talked about it before, like my Chemical/Nuclear Engineer (with EngD in the field of Process Engineering) who thinks the world is 6000 years old, yet knows how Atomic Theory works. The degree of cognitive dissonance is amazing, and you can "play with him" by getting him into a conversation about why we know the rate of radioisotope decay, yet it... doesn't prove the earth is billions of years old? You can actually hear the religious programming's self-defense systems "snapping" the fuses in his mind to "Off", if you listen closely. He'll just shut down instead.

My (Christian) fiancee, who is an evolutionary biologist in the field of genetics, is better at doing this to him than I am, because he knows to be wary of (atheist) me, but he adores her (rightfully so!) and she can walk him right into them. I just sit back and quietly chuckle to myself when she does it.

The Christians who amuse me more than creep me out are the ones who say "I'll pray for you" in the exact same way one of us would say, "Go fuck yourself."

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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19-08-2015, 08:12 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
(19-08-2015 08:02 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  I've talked about it before, like my Chemical/Nuclear Engineer (with EngD in the field of Process Engineering) who thinks the world is 6000 years old, yet knows how Atomic Theory works. The degree of cognitive dissonance is amazing, and you can "play with him" by getting him into a conversation about why we know the rate of radioisotope decay, yet it... doesn't prove the earth is billions of years old? You can actually hear the religious programming's self-defense systems "snapping" the fuses in his mind to "Off", if you listen closely. He'll just shut down instead.

Ya, I've gotten a first hand view of this many times during my time at college in regards to my professors (although I was in agreement with them until recently...). I'm studying math and computer science, so most of my professors are very capable of using logic and reasons to solve problems and prove things. But like in your example, their brain just shuts down when it comes to religious issues.

This doesn't have to deal with Christian's apologetics, but the funniest thing that I've heard one of my professors say is that whenever he was having problems getting a program to compile, he'd pray over it right before trying to compile it again... I mean, what is he expecting? For God to magically alter his program's code? If this actually happened, it would be a relatively easy miracle to prove...
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19-08-2015, 08:30 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
(19-08-2015 08:12 AM)Cozzymodo Wrote:  Ya, I've gotten a first hand view of this many times during my time at college in regards to my professors (although I was in agreement with them until recently...). I'm studying math and computer science, so most of my professors are very capable of using logic and reasons to solve problems and prove things. But like in your example, their brain just shuts down when it comes to religious issues.

This doesn't have to deal with Christian's apologetics, but the funniest thing that I've heard one of my professors say is that whenever he was having problems getting a program to compile, he'd pray over it right before trying to compile it again... I mean, what is he expecting? For God to magically alter his program's code? If this actually happened, it would be a relatively easy miracle to prove...

In fairness, he was just casting the Cleric (divine magic) Level 3 spell Prayer, which grants him and all allies +1 bonus on most rolls, enemies -1 penalty.

That way he'd get a +1 on his next roll for Knowledge-ComputerScience, and be more likely to diagnose and repair the problem (as well as the -1 penalty for whatever Demon/Devil is inside, stopping the program from working). Thing is, if he'd cast Fox's Cunning instead, he'd get a 1d4+1 boost to his INT (intelligence) score, and would have gotten the same bonus at minimum, and possibly up to +3 total. Silly professors, don't even know how to cast their divine magics properly.

That's why they're teaching, and not out in adventuring parties against Satan's minions.

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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19-08-2015, 08:33 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
(19-08-2015 08:30 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  In fairness, he was just casting the Cleric (divine magic) Level 3 spell Prayer, which grants him and all allies +1 bonus on most rolls, enemies -1 penalty.
....
That's why they're teaching, and not out in adventuring parties against Satan's minions.

Good point! =D
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19-08-2015, 08:43 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
(19-08-2015 08:30 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  That's why they're teaching, and not out in adventuring parties against Satan's minions.

But see, he can't cast Fox's Cunning, because if he bumps his intelligence too high, as Blind Faith trait will no longer boost his resistance to Reason Attacks, until he has time to recharge it by channeling Prayer and Meditation, which is not something that you wan't to be doing with battling with Satan's computer demons.
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19-08-2015, 08:48 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
(19-08-2015 08:43 AM)Cozzymodo Wrote:  
(19-08-2015 08:30 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  That's why they're teaching, and not out in adventuring parties against Satan's minions.

But see, he can't cast Fox's Cunning, because if he bumps his intelligence too high, as Blind Faith trait will no longer boost his resistance to Reason Attacks, until he has time to recharge it by channeling Prayer and Meditation, which is not something that you wan't to be doing with battling with Satan's computer demons.

Good point!

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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19-08-2015, 09:21 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
Yes. Overly religious people freak me out way more that others because many seem detached from reality.

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19-08-2015, 09:58 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
KingsChosen -

I tried making that point, while I was down visiting in Louisiana a couple weeks ago, with my father and a religious friend who had stopped by dad's house (his friend worked for the Louisiana conservation department, whatever its title is, a nominally similar job to my field biology work for the Kansas Dep't of Health & Environment... except he was basically a "parks/trails maintenance" type, not a science type), when I mentioned that part of my job for KDHE was keeping track of fauna populations' ranges and evolutionary variance over large territories. They struck immediately into "but evolution is false because (wrong reasoning)" stuff from their church, and the guy suggested I had to be an atheist (I didn't acknowledge that crap either way) if I believed in evolution, because the "purpose of evolution is to try to destroy God".

My first instinct was to call him a moron and stalk away, but he clearly was someone my dad loved and respected, so I tried a different tack. I pointed out that, if God is the Creator of the Earth and all the life thereupon, then by definition whatever we find in the earth through the scientific method is discovering first-hand the work of the creator, and what higher praise for the Almighty could there be than to seek out his handiwork? I then pointed out the work of Christian biologists (Miller and Collins, specifically) who said that was among their primary motivations, and asked whether it would be better to have faith in the words of 3000-year-old Hebrew humans, or what we can observe in the Creation directly... I suggested (politely) that it is the Creationist, not the evolutionary biologist, who denies God.

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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19-08-2015, 10:01 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
(19-08-2015 09:58 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  KingsChosen -

I tried making that point, while I was down visiting in Louisiana a couple weeks ago, with my father and a religious friend who had stopped by dad's house (his friend worked for the Louisiana conservation department, whatever its title is, a nominally similar job to my field biology work for the Kansas Dep't of Health & Environment... except he was basically a "parks/trails maintenance" type, not a science type), when I mentioned that part of my job for KDHE was keeping track of fauna populations' ranges and evolutionary variance over large territories. They struck immediately into "but evolution is false because (wrong reasoning)" stuff from their church, and the guy suggested I had to be an atheist (I didn't acknowledge that crap either way) if I believed in evolution, because the "purpose of evolution is to try to destroy God".

My first instinct was to call him a moron and stalk away, but he clearly was someone my dad loved and respected, so I tried a different tack. I pointed out that, if God is the Creator of the Earth and all the life thereupon, then by definition whatever we find in the earth through the scientific method is discovering first-hand the work of the creator, and what higher praise for the Almighty could there be than to seek out his handiwork? I then pointed out the work of Christian biologists (Miller and Collins, specifically) who said that was among their primary motivations, and asked whether it would be better to have faith in the words of 3000-year-old Hebrew humans, or what we can observe in the Creation directly... I suggested (politely) that it is the Creationist, not the evolutionary biologist, who denies God.

*clap*

But, you did forget *drops mic* at the end of your speech Smile

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19-08-2015, 10:04 AM
RE: Do religious people ever just weird you out?
(19-08-2015 09:58 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  KingsChosen -

I tried making that point, while I was down visiting in Louisiana a couple weeks ago, with my father and a religious friend who had stopped by dad's house (his friend worked for the Louisiana conservation department, whatever its title is, a nominally similar job to my field biology work for the Kansas Dep't of Health & Environment... except he was basically a "parks/trails maintenance" type, not a science type), when I mentioned that part of my job for KDHE was keeping track of fauna populations' ranges and evolutionary variance over large territories. They struck immediately into "but evolution is false because (wrong reasoning)" stuff from their church, and the guy suggested I had to be an atheist (I didn't acknowledge that crap either way) if I believed in evolution, because the "purpose of evolution is to try to destroy God".

My first instinct was to call him a moron and stalk away, but he clearly was someone my dad loved and respected, so I tried a different tack. I pointed out that, if God is the Creator of the Earth and all the life thereupon, then by definition whatever we find in the earth through the scientific method is discovering first-hand the work of the creator, and what higher praise for the Almighty could there be than to seek out his handiwork? I then pointed out the work of Christian biologists (Miller and Collins, specifically) who said that was among their primary motivations, and asked whether it would be better to have faith in the words of 3000-year-old Hebrew humans, or what we can observe in the Creation directly... I suggested (politely) that it is the Creationist, not the evolutionary biologist, who denies God.

Out of curiosity, how did he take this different approach?
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