Do the victors really write the history in the long term?
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31-05-2013, 08:57 PM
RE: Do the victors really write the history in the long term?
(31-05-2013 03:56 PM)tear151 Wrote:  In the short term it may be true but what about after the said victor has ceased to exist or has remained dormant for centuries, just some brain chewing gum.

Once you get that old it eludes memory, and then people only guess. Like what we experience now with ancient cultures.

"People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use." Soren Kierkegaard
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01-06-2013, 01:50 AM
RE: Do the victors really write the history in the long term?
(31-05-2013 04:41 PM)Revenant77x Wrote:  ...generally the longer ago it was and the more complete the victory the more that holds true.

This. Thumbsup

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01-06-2013, 04:56 PM
Do the victors really write the history in the long term?
(31-05-2013 03:56 PM)tear151 Wrote:  In the short term it may be true but what about after the said victor has ceased to exist or has remained dormant for centuries, just some brain chewing gum.

Yes it's true, we have "Alexander the great" which is equivalent to saying hitler the great, both are brutal conquerors and one of them succeeded in defeating his enemies.
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08-06-2013, 05:07 PM
RE: Do the victors really write the history in the long term?
Not neccessarily. Sparta won over athens during the peloponnesian war, but it's the Athen's viewpoint we always hear about.

But generally, I would assume it would be true.
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