Do you have pets?
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26-09-2012, 07:26 AM
RE: Do you have pets?
(25-09-2012 08:59 PM)Anjele Wrote:  Hey Dom...

My latest addition (the female Cavalier) is nine months old now. We have a couple issues with her, the first being barking. I get that it's often when she hears another dog outside or some other noise, but she really gets on a roll and won't quiet down.

Another is that although she hasn't been a destructive chewer, she loves to chew and I provide tons of chew toys which she puts to good use. When outside she finds a stick or anything she can chew. Inside, she has never chewed a shoe or furniture or anything else till I brought home a basket to sit on the hearth. She managed to nibble away a part of the corner on the second day. If I see her near it, I make an abrupt sound that gets her attention and tell her no. That usually diverts her attention but I can't be here 24/7. I have been putting it up on a table when I go to work but really want her to learn that chewing on it isn't appropriate.

While all three dogs are happy to see me arrive home or even come back downstairs after even a few minutes...she is way past happy, like delirious. She is much more high strung than my other dogs but sometimes this extreme reaction is overwhelming. I have considered it may be separation anxiety or puppy exuberance. I enjoy the happy greetings but she really is over the top.

Any ideas?

Some dogs just have an overly exuberant nature, my Drago is the same and he's big.

It goes away with age, other than that correcting it would mean stifling the dog to where it is constantly stressed and will develop odd and often destructive behaviors. So let her dance around or whatever she does, long as she doesn't end up doing bad things while exuberant. Then only address that particular behavior, not the world view she has...

The basket - how about some nice pepper sauce on it? Or just ground cayenne pepper? She must think it's like the sticks she chews outside and that's why she attacked it... Some strong perfume on it may work too, so it doesn't smell like sticks anymore.

The barking - always a hard one. The dog needs to understand "no" if you want to regulate the barking. Then you pick a number of barks that is acceptable and short, like 3. Everytime the 4th bark erupts, it's "no". As soon as the barking stops, it's praise. Eventually you will be getting 3 barks without correction.

Remember to always follow "no" with praise the second the bad behavior stops. It defines the bad behavior for the dog. Otherwise she'll think you are just a grumpy old coot and ignore the "no". It's "now you are bad, now you are good" so the dog can understand precisely what is going on.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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26-09-2012, 07:53 AM
RE: Do you have pets?
Thanks Dom...I will try some pepper...forgot I used chili powder several years ago to deter a wandering neighbor dog from getting into the bin outside.

She is definitely exuberant! I just wish she would let me get all the way in the door before the full on love fest begins. I must say she is the happiest, lovingest little thing I have ever seen and I have never scolded her for lavishing me with her affection.

Will have to work on the barking...it is the part of her hyper nature that is toughest to deal with.

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26-09-2012, 12:11 PM
RE: Do you have pets?
(26-09-2012 07:53 AM)Anjele Wrote:  Thanks Dom...I will try some pepper...forgot I used chili powder several years ago to deter a wandering neighbor dog from getting into the bin outside.

She is definitely exuberant! I just wish she would let me get all the way in the door before the full on love fest begins. I must say she is the happiest, lovingest little thing I have ever seen and I have never scolded her for lavishing me with her affection.

Will have to work on the barking...it is the part of her hyper nature that is toughest to deal with.

If the "no" is firmly in place, the barking can be managed... if she doesn't shut up when you say "no", the "no" is the problem, not the barking.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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26-09-2012, 04:02 PM
RE: Do you have pets?
(26-09-2012 01:48 AM)Leela Wrote:  Red Tornado, cats tend to have problems with the kidneys and also with the bladder because they are naturally not drinking a lot. How old is the cat and what are you currently feeding her usually?
If it is a lot of dry food, you should consider swapping that and give wet food instead. Or at least put water in the dry food and let it absorb so the cat gets fluid by eating.

(here it goes Big Grin I am the cat-version of Dom Big Grin )
We're not sure exactly, we think it's around 3 years old. Yeah - we fed her mostly dry food, so we're switching to giving her more wet food.

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26-09-2012, 04:13 PM
RE: Do you have pets?
the pepper reminds me of what I used to do when the pets begged at the table, I would offer mustard on my finger. they quickly understood that this is all they can have, and stopped begging.
With Sock I have a different approach, which also works. I am not using words with her usually, bad behaviour has a sharp "SH!" and a step towards her, simply showing her that this is mine and I claim it (whatever "this" is) and she always instantly backs up. This way I can even take food out of her mouth and she is not fighting that (especially important if she tries to eat something that is not good for her).

I find that important > "no" or "SH!" or whatever you chose to be a globel sign of "whatever you do, stop it now!", it can be so important that the dog understands this message!
I am not sure if I mentioned it here or in a pm to Dom but in our case, we live on a busy main road and when I wanna walk the dog, this road must be crossed because on our side there is no pedestrian walk. If she would not know the "SH!" she'd be pulling and bouncing and whatever, but this way, the second she starts it I "SH!" her and she stops and is calm right away, and we can savely cross.

About the VERY excited greeting. May I suggest something? I am kinda new to dogs but Sock is a big dog, a boxer, and when we first got her she was always very very VERY excited about every move we did, about every touch she got etc. We are pretty quiet people at home and easy going, so this overexcitement had to go down a bit, and such a big dog, if she does that to guests they might get scared or overwhelmed and we don't wanna scare people away.
We pretty much did what dogs do. No force no fights, we made her lay down and relax and the second she relaxed we praised her and pet her. When she got overly excited we made her lay down and relax again, and so on. Of course it can look like something crazy in the beginning because what happens first is this:
dog: *barks bounces licks runs*
you: "SH"/"NO" *lay her down, make her relax* (this can take a bit if she is not used to that)
dog: *takes a deep breath and stops fighting*
you: *pet dog, talk nice and quietly*
dog: *starts fighting/bouncing/barking immediately* because he is so happy to get this nice treatment
you: "SH"/"NO" *lay her down, make her relax* ......
And the circle starts over.
It took a day for her to understand what's going on, and a second day to get it stuck in her mind. It is kinda exhausting for those first two days because you have to repeat this process so much, but at least in our case it worked wonders. It didn't even take a week for her to calm down to a level where everyone, including her, can enjoy the cuddling.
By now, if she wants to be caressed and cuddled (this is 10 days later) she sits down, looks at us sweetly, calmly waks her tail. And she absolutely gets cuddled then.

I think you can try a similar approach at the door. Not sure if your new dog can make the connection, or has ever gotten such treatment, but it in a pack of dogs it is normal that those who are over excited, they get nipped (not hard) and will have to surrender and calm down. This is why we did that. We are not nipping though Big Grin We just poke with the fingers (not really hard though, no worries)

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26-09-2012, 04:23 PM
RE: Do you have pets?
My cats get whatever they want... I don't own them, they own me.

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26-09-2012, 05:01 PM
RE: Do you have pets?
(26-09-2012 04:02 PM)Red Tornado Wrote:  
(26-09-2012 01:48 AM)Leela Wrote:  Red Tornado, cats tend to have problems with the kidneys and also with the bladder because they are naturally not drinking a lot. How old is the cat and what are you currently feeding her usually?
If it is a lot of dry food, you should consider swapping that and give wet food instead. Or at least put water in the dry food and let it absorb so the cat gets fluid by eating.

(here it goes Big Grin I am the cat-version of Dom Big Grin )
We're not sure exactly, we think it's around 3 years old. Yeah - we fed her mostly dry food, so we're switching to giving her more wet food.

the wet food is often a bit more expensive, and try to avoid whiskas because for some reason the cats get hooked on that and it is so expensive. No-name from the supermarket is just fine, not overprized and comes in enough different flavours.
Also if it gets too much financially, as I said you can either just put some water in the dry food that you serve and let it absorb before you give it to them.
Another approach to simply make them drink more would be to put stuff in their water that they like a lot. Something my cats used to like was, when I ate mozarella, I would give them the water of it. Or you put in their water a little bit of milk. The point is, cats love milk but they get diarrhea if they have too much (yoghurt counts in that category too) so take care that you don't serve them like a whole cup at a time. two or three table spoons mixed in the water is enough.
What I also did a few times, put a treat in the water bowl and make them fish it out because they will try and catch it with the paw and constantly lick the water off the paw because it feels funny. (trick em hah)
Also when you make meat (if you are not using fat/oil/conduments) you could put the fluids that come out of it in the water, or if you have fresh meat, you know the bloody water that is in there sometimes. cats like to lick that, it's not gonna harm them and it is fluid, so why not let them lick it.
For a human that all sounds pretty gross, and I had people looking at me like I am a crazy person, but my cats where very healthy and fit and smart.
One of my cats got sick with the bladder, just like yours with the liver, before the vet explained that drinking problem to me, so I had to find ways to make him drink more. Back than he just survived but after the hospital he never got sick again. A few of the hints up there are actually from the doctor, the rest ... well found out myself and read some stuff in forums.

Hope that helps.

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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26-09-2012, 05:05 PM
RE: Do you have pets?
(26-09-2012 04:13 PM)Leela Wrote:  the pepper reminds me of what I used to do when the pets begged at the table, I would offer mustard on my finger. they quickly understood that this is all they can have, and stopped begging.
With Sock I have a different approach, which also works. I am not using words with her usually, bad behaviour has a sharp "SH!" and a step towards her, simply showing her that this is mine and I claim it (whatever "this" is) and she always instantly backs up. This way I can even take food out of her mouth and she is not fighting that (especially important if she tries to eat something that is not good for her).

I find that important > "no" or "SH!" or whatever you chose to be a globel sign of "whatever you do, stop it now!", it can be so important that the dog understands this message!
I am not sure if I mentioned it here or in a pm to Dom but in our case, we live on a busy main road and when I wanna walk the dog, this road must be crossed because on our side there is no pedestrian walk. If she would not know the "SH!" she'd be pulling and bouncing and whatever, but this way, the second she starts it I "SH!" her and she stops and is calm right away, and we can savely cross.

About the VERY excited greeting. May I suggest something? I am kinda new to dogs but Sock is a big dog, a boxer, and when we first got her she was always very very VERY excited about every move we did, about every touch she got etc. We are pretty quiet people at home and easy going, so this overexcitement had to go down a bit, and such a big dog, if she does that to guests they might get scared or overwhelmed and we don't wanna scare people away.
We pretty much did what dogs do. No force no fights, we made her lay down and relax and the second she relaxed we praised her and pet her. When she got overly excited we made her lay down and relax again, and so on. Of course it can look like something crazy in the beginning because what happens first is this:
dog: *barks bounces licks runs*
you: "SH"/"NO" *lay her down, make her relax* (this can take a bit if she is not used to that)
dog: *takes a deep breath and stops fighting*
you: *pet dog, talk nice and quietly*
dog: *starts fighting/bouncing/barking immediately* because he is so happy to get this nice treatment
you: "SH"/"NO" *lay her down, make her relax* ......
And the circle starts over.
It took a day for her to understand what's going on, and a second day to get it stuck in her mind. It is kinda exhausting for those first two days because you have to repeat this process so much, but at least in our case it worked wonders. It didn't even take a week for her to calm down to a level where everyone, including her, can enjoy the cuddling.
By now, if she wants to be caressed and cuddled (this is 10 days later) she sits down, looks at us sweetly, calmly waks her tail. And she absolutely gets cuddled then.

I think you can try a similar approach at the door. Not sure if your new dog can make the connection, or has ever gotten such treatment, but it in a pack of dogs it is normal that those who are over excited, they get nipped (not hard) and will have to surrender and calm down. This is why we did that. We are not nipping though Big Grin We just poke with the fingers (not really hard though, no worries)

Well, there is a difference between a large dog that is over reacting because she is finally free and has been chained all her life, and a smaller dog that is just naturally excitable.

And I don't just mean that an overly exuberant large dog can be even dangerous and knock people over. There is definitely a difference between the behavior of smaller and larger dogs, and that is why most people like either one or the other and seldom both.

An exuberant boxer can be a "wrigglebutt" and that expresses the excitement fully, a smaller dog will be wriggling the entire body, resulting in spinning around. Trying to make a Chihuahua act like a great Dane is not only impossible, it's cruel. They are not built the same way.

Of course a Spaniel is not a Chihuahua, but it's also not a Boxer.

Here we have two other Spaniels in the house, albeit older. But we have a comparison in personality traits for the same type dog in the same environment. And this one just has a higher metabolism, a new puppy generally molds itself after the older resident dogs and this is not happening here. And you are right Leela, if the older dogs recognized the rumbunctiousness as just bad behavior, they would likey step in and nip. But they are not doing that, they recognize the behavior as personality.

Knowing as little as I do about the dogs here, my best guess is that the new guy doesn't understand that no means no and it always means no and it is to be obeyed.
No won't fix the innate exciteability, but it will confine it to the floor for instance, no jumping up. It will stop the barking. And whatever other annoying habits there are.

With a proper understanding of "no", the excitement can continue to exist, but it should not interfere with the functioning and happiness of people.

And Leela, I doubt your dog is overly exciteable. If she didn't overreact for the next several months, I would suspect she was sick, physically or mentally. Coming from her background into the new situation, she is partially extremely happy and partially extremely stressed. All that will stop by itself in time, and it's fine and productive to show her what is not acceptable, but no matter what, she needs time to adjust to a totally alien life. She is like a child that was raised by wolves in the forest and is suddenly dropped in the middle of a city. It's overwhelming. She will overreact. And calming and reassuring guidance is all it will take and she will be herself in a few months. She hasn't even developed a personality as yet.... you're still in for a treat when she does. Boxers can be super comical. She will bring you a lot of laughter as yet...

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
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26-09-2012, 05:09 PM
RE: Do you have pets?
I don't like giving my cats dry food... have you ever eaten 4 plain cream crackers in a row? Sooooo dry! Tongue

It is Whiskas for my lil' fuzz balls. Big Grin

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26-09-2012, 05:09 PM
RE: Do you have pets?
(26-09-2012 04:23 PM)frankiej Wrote:  My cats get whatever they want... I don't own them, they own me.

I also always say, I don't own my pets. But I want them to work for what they get just like I work for what I get. The food tastes so much better, when you earned it. Smile


Generally:
Not only is the new dog right now in the process of learning certain things to earn her treats etc, even my guineapig (back then) had to work for the food, because I would put it inside something or hide it or so, so that was entertainment and workout. The cats had to sit down and wait instead of meowing and running around my legs, before I would put the food down and often I would also hide food somewhere or in something so they had to use their brains to get to it.

Once Sock (the new dog) knows all the basics I will do the same for her, because I want her to be entertained, to do something with her brain, and finally be proud that she earnt something. And it would be sad to have that effect stop once she knows her basics.

"Freedom is the freedom to say that 2+2=4" - George Orwell (in 1984)
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