Does White Privilege Exist?
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29-06-2017, 04:04 AM
RE: Does White Privilege Exist?
(29-06-2017 12:14 AM)Stevil Wrote:  
(28-06-2017 11:44 PM)morondog Wrote:  Stevil you see evidence that black people commit crimes at a higher rate, I see evidence that there is systematic discrimination in the justice system.
Higher incarceration rates isn't evidence for systematic discrimination in the justice system.
If one assumes the justice system is working then higher incarceration rates is evidence for higher crime rates.

What evidence is there to say that the justice system isn't working?

(28-06-2017 11:44 PM)morondog Wrote:  black people historically in the US and elsewhere have been and continue to be denied economic power and education.
I don't know if this is true.
What laws or rules lead to black people being denied education and economic power?

I'll answer your questions shortly, to the best of my ability. I'm not an expert though. All I'm gonna be doing is googling. TBH I'm somewhat taken aback that you question either of these things - there have been enough high profile miscarriages of justice in the last couple of years. And the whole slavery thing... and subsequent marginalisation of black and other minority groups... is well attested history. You seem to think all that discrimination just went away the moment segregation laws were taken off the books?

Nevertheless, it's not a bad thing to answer either question with hard data. Incidentally the two questions that I will be attempting to answer are the following:
  • Is there systematic discrimination in the US justice system?
  • Are black people denied economic and educational opportunities on the basis of skin colour?

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29-06-2017, 06:41 AM (This post was last modified: 29-06-2017 06:56 AM by Thumpalumpacus.)
RE: Does White Privilege Exist?
(28-06-2017 10:01 PM)Stevil Wrote:  [...] look into the reasons why they commit crimes at a higher rate than other races (if that is the case, incarceration rates suggest it is).

That suggestion is tenuous at best, and fallacious at worst.

(28-06-2017 10:13 PM)Stevil Wrote:  If blacks gain a reputation as being trustworthy and dependable then they might perhaps become favoured for jobs.

I would disparage the idea of regarding any human as trustworthy or not based on their race -- especially in the context of hiring. But even in simple interpersonal relations, I prefer to take humans as individuals rather than representatives of their racial group.

Call me crazy.

(29-06-2017 12:14 AM)Stevil Wrote:  If one assumes the justice system is working then higher incarceration rates is evidence for higher crime rates.

That would be a fatuous assumption.

(29-06-2017 12:14 AM)Stevil Wrote:  What evidence is there to say that the justice system isn't working?

Here in America, I'd start with the disproportionate application of the death penalty. That is strong evidence that there is racial bias in the justice system. Blacks are more likely to be sentenced to death than whites here, disproportionate to their representation in capital cases.

(29-06-2017 12:14 AM)Stevil Wrote:  I don't know if this is true.
What laws or rules lead to black people being denied education and economic power?

The assumption that such denial is based on law or regulation is just that: an assumption. There is a difference between de jure and de facto.
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29-06-2017, 08:15 AM
RE: Does White Privilege Exist?
(29-06-2017 06:41 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  
(28-06-2017 10:13 PM)Stevil Wrote:  If blacks gain a reputation as being trustworthy and dependable then they might perhaps become favoured for jobs.

I would disparage the idea of regarding any human as trustworthy or not based on their race -- especially in the context of hiring. But even in simple interpersonal relations, I prefer to take humans as individuals rather than representatives of their racial group.

Call me crazy.

Stevil here exhibits an important example of white privilege, maybe inadvertently, even as he seems to be denying it (or somehow trying to justify it?). The idea that you will be judged, not on the reputation of your race, but as an individual. You are just you, as opposed to a prototype of whiteness.

This "privilege" to be subject to normal standards allows one to make and learn from their mistakes without undermining the reputation of their race. You can be angry, whine, and bitch about nothing without implicating your entire race. You can be great at something and not necessarily have that viewed as a racial positive.

In summary, you get to be yourself and not a representative of your race. You are judged for your actions or crimes, not the actions or crimes of a different individual in your race.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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29-06-2017, 08:45 AM
RE: Does White Privilege Exist?
Okay, so regarding KUSA's video- it does present only one facet of the issue. It looks primarily at economic differences to claim white privilege isn't a thing. However, the concept is much broader than simple economics and income. It may be true that other races make more money on average than white people, but white people are in general treated with more respect and given the benefit of the doubt more often.

Stevil- I think we need to actually look up some information on this rather than assuming the cause of the crime rate differential.

We can start with Wikipedia- a great compilation of data with sourcing.

Race and crime in the United States

Quote:The relationship between race and crime in the United States has been a topic of public controversy and scholarly debate for more than a century.[1] The incarceration rate of blacks (African Americans) is more than three times higher than their representation in the general population.[2] Research suggest that the overrepresentation of some minorities in the criminal justice system is due to socioeconomic factors and racial discrimination by the criminal justice system.[3]

So we acknowledge that it's a controversial topic. But black people are incarcerated at a higher rate than white people. But research suggests some causes. The research does exist. People have not been ignoring this situation, and have been studying it for many decades.

Okay- so below is an excerpt from the same Wikipedia page. It's very thorough in the different schools of thought on crime rates related to race. It is still a controversial topic, though lots of studies have been performed, and most of these theories are presented with supporting studies. I think that it's likely that a whole host of factors play into the differing crime rates among races, so presumably more than one of these theories would hold some truth.

There's A LOT here, and I'm still reading through it myself, but I will finish reading it. If you want sources for the studies, visit the Wikipedia article itself and review the sources.

Quote:Modern theories of causation[edit]
Conflict theory[edit]
Further information: Conflict theory, Conflict criminology, and Marxist criminology
Conflict theory is considered "one of the most popular theoretical frameworks among race and crime scholars".[76] Rather than one monolithic theory, conflict theory represents a group of closely related theories which operate on a common set of fundamental assumptions.[77] As a general theory of criminal behavior, conflict theory proposes that crime is an inevitable consequence of the conflict which arises between competing groups within society. Such groups can be defined through a number of factors, including class, economic status, religion, language, ethnicity, race or any combination thereof. Further, conflict theory proposes that crime could be largely eliminated if the structure of society were to be changed.[78]

The form of conflict theory which emphasizes the role of economics, being heavily influenced by the work of Karl Marx and sometimes referred to as Marxist criminology, views crime as a natural response to the inequality arising from the competition inherent in capitalist society.[79] Sociologists and criminologists emphasizing this aspect of social conflict argue that, in a competitive society in which there is an inequality in the distribution of goods, those groups with limited or restricted access to goods will be more likely to turn to crime. Dutch criminologist Willem Adriaan Bonger, one of the first scholars to apply the principles of economic determinism to the issue of crime, argued that such inequality as found in capitalism was ultimately responsible for the manifestation of crime at all levels of society, particularly among the poor. Though this line of thinking has been criticized for requiring the establishment of a utopian socialist society,[80] the notion that the disproportionality observed in minority representation in crime rate statistics could be understood as the result of systematic economic disadvantage found its way into many of the theories developed in subsequent generations.

Culture conflict theory, derived from the pioneering work of sociologist Thorsten Sellin, emphasizes the role of culturally accepted norms of conduct in the formation of cultural groups and the conflicts which arise through their interaction. Culture conflict theory argues that the group with the most power in any society ensures that their values, traditions and behaviors, which Sellin referred to as "conduct norms", are those to which all other members of society are forced to conform, and any actions which conflict with the interests of the dominant group are identified as deviant and/or criminal in nature. Sellin's original ideas continued to be developed throughout the 20th century, most notably by George Vold in the 1950s and Austin Turk in the 1960s, and continue to influence the contemporary debate.[81] The recent work of Gregory J. Howard, Joshua D. Freilich and Graeme R. Newman applies culture conflict theory to the issue of immigrant and minority crime around the world. According to their research, while culturally homogeneous groups experience little to no cultural conflict, as all the members share the same set of "conduct norms", culturally heterogeneous groups, such as modern industrial nations with large immigrant populations, display heightened competition between sets of cultural norms which, in turn, leads to an increase in violence and crime. Societies which have high levels of cultural diversity in their population, it is claimed, are more likely to have higher rates of violent crime.[81]

According to conflict theorists such as Marvin Wolfgang, Hubert Blalock and William Chambliss, the disproportionate representation of racial minorities in crime statistics and in the prison population is the result of race- and class-motivated disparities in arrests, prosecutions and sentencing rather than differences in actual participation in criminal activity, an approach which has also been taken by proponents of critical race theory.[82] This line of argumentation is generally seen as part of a wider approach to race-related issues referred to as the Discrimination Thesis, which assumes that differences in the treatment received by people of minority racial background in a number of public institutions, including the criminal justice, education and health care systems, is the result of overt racial discrimination. Opposed to this view is the Non-Discrimination Thesis, which seeks to defend these institutions from such accusations.[83]

At the time it was first proposed, conflict theory was considered outside the mainstream of more established criminological theories, such as strain theory, social disorganization theory and differential association theory.[84] Barbara D. Warner, associate professor of criminal justice and police studies at Eastern Kentucky University, notes that conflict theory has been the subject of increasing criticism in recent years. Recent studies claim that, while there may have been real sentencing differences related to non-legal characteristics such as race in the 1960s, sentencing discrimination as described by the conflict theorists at that time no longer exists. Criticism has also pointed to the lack of testability of the general theory.[80] While much research has been done to correlate race, income level and crime frequency, typically of less serious criminal behavior such as theft or larceny, research has shown there to be no significant correlation between race, income level and crime seriousness. Thus, conflict theory encounters difficulties in attempting to account for the high levels of violent crime such as murder, homicide and rape, in minority populations.[85]

Strain (anomie) theory[edit]
Further information: Strain theory (sociology) and Anomie
Strain theory, which is largely derived from the work of Robert K. Merton in the 1930s and 1940s, argues that social structures within society which lead to inequality and deprivation in segments of its population indirectly encourage those segments to commit crime. According to strain theory, differences in crime rates between races are the result of real differences in behavior, but to be understood as an attempt to alleviate either absolute or relative deprivation and adapt to the existing opportunity structure.[86]

A more recent approach to strain theory was proposed by Steven F. Messner and Richard Rosenfeld in the 1990s. In their version of the theory, which they refer to as institutional anomie theory, Messner and Rosenfeld argue that the dominance of materialistic concerns and measurements of success manifested in the American Dream weakens the effectiveness of informal social control mechanisms and support processes, which encourages economic gain by any means, legal or illegal. In those segments of the population which experience the greatest relative deprivation, therefore, there is readiness to turn to crime to overcome inequality and eliminate relative deprivation.[87]

Critics of strain theory point to its weaknesses when compared with actual criminal behavior patterns. Michael R. Gottfredson and Travis Hirschi argue that strain theory "misconstrue(s) the nature of the criminal act, supplying it with virtues it does not possess." They further point out that, while strain theory suggests that criminals should tend to target people in a more advantageous economic situation than themselves, they more often victimize individuals who live in the same economic circumstances.[88]

General strain theory[edit]
Main article: General strain theory
Multiple studies have found evidence that Agnew's general strain theory explains much of the difference in crime between blacks and whites.[89][90][91]

Social disorganization theory[edit]
Further information: Social disorganization theory
Social disorganization theory proposes that high rates of crime are largely the result of a heterogeneous and impoverished social ecology.[92] Proponents of the theory point to the process of urban decay as a major contributing factor to the breakdown of healthy urban communities which would normally curb the spread of many forms of criminal behavior. The diversity of minority cultures present in poverty-stricken neighborhoods prevents the formation of strong social bonds and leaves inhabitants uninterested in maintaining positive community relationships. This has been observed to increase the likelihood of crime in certain urban areas, which can lead to increased policing and a further breakdown of familial structures as a result of arrests, which, in turn, precipitates more crime. Social disorganization theory has been instrumental in establishing the notion that stable, culturally homogeneous communities have lower rates of delinquency and crime regardless of race.[93]

Macrostructural opportunity theory[edit]
Phillippia Simmons reports that many of the studies which have investigated intra- and interracial crime seek to explain this through a theory of macrostructural opportunity which states that interracial violence is primarily a function of opportunity and access.[94] According to this theory, intraracial crime rates remain relatively high due to the fact that much of the US remains residentially segregated. She notes that this theory predicts that, if residential areas were more racially integrated, intraracial crime would decrease and interracial crime would increase correspondingly. However, she also notes that not all researchers on the topic of intraracial crime agree with this result, with some pointing to other macrostructural factors, such as income and education, which may negate the effect of race on inter- and intraracial crime.[94] A 1994 study found a strong association between black-white spatial isolation and rates of black violence, consistent with the hypothesis that segregation is responsible for higher rates of black crime.[95] Multiple other studies have reached similar conclusions.[96][97]

Anthony Walsh criticizes the attempt to use the macrostructural opportunity model to explain interracial rape as has been done in studies conducted in the past few decades, pointing out that such a defense is directly contradicted by the data related to homicide. Walsh argues that the macrostructural opportunity model helps explain why black murderers almost always choose black victims.[98] There are disparities in rates of reporting rape where victims of some races are statistically less likely or more likely to report their rape, especially depending on the race of the offender. Black women in America are more likely to report sexual assault that has been perpetrated by a stranger.[99][100] Black women are more likely to under-report rapes overall as they are more likely to blame themselves, feel they will be blamed or feel they won't be believed.[101]

Structural factors[edit]
Evidence supporting the role of structural factors in high black crime rates comes from multiple studies. For example, Robert J. Sampson has reported that most of the reason violent crime rates are so high among blacks originates mainly from unemployment, economic deprivation, and family disorganization. Specifically, he found that "the scarcity of employed black men increases the prevalence of families headed by females in black communities" and that the increased prevalence of such families in turn results in family disruption that significantly increases black murder and robbery rates.[102] Sampson et al.[103] and Phillips[104] have reported that at least half of the black-white homicide offending differential is attributable to structural neighborhood factors like parents' marital status and social context. Multiple other studies have found a link between black crime rates and structural factors, such as single-parent families.[105][106]

Social control theory[edit]
Further information: Social control theory
Social control theory, which is among the most popular theories in criminology,[107] proposes that crime is most commonly perpetrated by individuals who lack strong bonds or connections with their social environment.[108] Based upon Travis Hirschi's Causes of Delinquency (1969), social bonding theory pioneered the notion that criminologists can gain useful insight into the motives behind criminal behavior by examining what normally motivates individuals to refrain from crime. From this it is argued that, in those segments of the population where such motivation is lacking, crime will be more prevalent. Hirschi was explicit in mentioning that he believed his theory held true across all racial boundaries, and subsequent research - both in the US and abroad - seems to confirm this belief.[109] The core idea of social control theory is elaborated upon in several other theories of causation, particularly social disorganization theory.

Subculture of violence theory[edit]
Further information: Subcultural theory
As a theory of criminal behavior, subculture of violence theory claims that certain groups or subcultures exist in society in which violence is viewed as an appropriate response to what, in the context of that subculture, are perceived as threatening situations. Building upon the work of cultural anthropologist Walter B. Miller's focal concerns theory, which focused on the social mechanisms behind delinquency in adolescents, sociologists Marvin Wolfgang and Franco Ferracuti proposed that the disproportionally high rate of crime among African Americans could be explained by their possessing a unique racial subculture in which violence is experienced and perceived in a manner different from that commonly observed in mainstream American culture.[110]

As to the origins of this subculture of violence among African Americans, sociologists promoting the theory have pointed towards their Southern heritage. As noted in several studies conducted throughout the 1960s and 1970s, there is a traditional North-South discrepancy in the distribution of homicide in the US, regardless of race, and this, it was argued, indicates that lower-class Southern Blacks and Whites share the same subculture of violence.[111]

The empirical basis for the subculture of violence theory, however, has been described as "extremely limited and unpersuasive".[111] Very little has been done to attempt an adequate assessment of supposedly criminogenic subcultural values, and several studies conducted in the late 1970s claimed to falsify the assumptions upon which the subculture of violence theory depends.[111] More recently, scholars have criticized the theory as potentially racist in nature in its implication of one given ethnicity or culture supposedly being less fit for or less worthy of being qualified as "civilized," the built-in implication of which in turn would denote stereotypically "white" behavior as an objective norm for all societies to follow.[112]

Prosecutorial and police discrimination theory[edit]
Further information: Racial inequality in the American criminal justice system
Research suggests that police practices, such as racial profiling, over-policing in areas populated by minorities and in-group bias may result in disproportionately high numbers of racial minorities among crime suspects.[113][114][115][116] Research also suggests that there may be possible discrimination by the judicial system, which contributes to a higher number of convictions for racial minorities.[117][118][119][120][121] A 2012 study found that "(i) juries formed from all-white jury pools convict black defendants significantly (16 percentage points) more often than white defendants, and (ii) this gap in conviction rates is entirely eliminated when the jury pool includes at least one black member."[119] Research has found evidence of in-group bias, where "black (white) juveniles who are randomly assigned to black (white) judges are more likely to get incarcerated (as opposed to being placed on probation), and they receive longer sentences."[121] In-group bias has also been observed when it comes to traffic citations, as black and white cops are more likely to cite out-groups.[115] A 2016 paper by Roland G. Fryer, Jr, found that while there are no racial differences in lethal use of police force, blacks and Hispanics are significantly more likely to experience non-lethal use of force.[122] Reports by the Department of Justice have also found that police officers in Baltimore, Maryland, and Ferguson, Missouri, systemically stop, search (in some cases strip-searching) and harass black residents.[123][124] A January 2017 report by the DOJ also found that the Chicago Police Department had "unconstitutionally engaged in a pattern of excessive and deadly force" and that police "have no regard for the sanctity of life when it comes to people of color".[125]

In criminal sentencing, medium to dark-skinned African Americans are likely to receive sentences 2.6 years longer than those of whites or light-skinned African Americans. When a white victim is involved, those with more "black" features are likely to receive a much more severe punishment.[126]

A 2013 report by the American Civil Liberties Union found that blacks were "3.73 times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana possession", even though "blacks and whites use drugs, including marijuana, at similar rates."[127]

A 2016 analysis by the New York Times "of tens of thousands of disciplinary cases against inmates in 2015, hundreds of pages of internal reports and three years of parole decisions found that racial disparities were embedded in the prison experience in New York."[128] Blacks and Latinos were sent more frequently to solitary and held there for longer durations than whites.[128] The New York Times analysis found that the disparities were the greatest for violations where the prison guards had lots of discretion, such as disobeying orders, but smaller for violations that required physical evidence, such as possessing contraband.[128]

A 2016 report by the Sarasota Herald-Tribune found that Florida judges sentence black defendants to far longer prison sentences than whites with the same background.[129] For the same drug possession crimes, blacks were sentenced to double the time of whites.[129] Blacks were given longer sentences in 60 percent of felony cases, 68 percent of the most serious first-degree crimes, 45 percent of burglary cases and 30 percent of battery cases.[129] For third-degree felonies (the least serious types of felonies in Florida), white judges sentenced blacks to twenty percent more time than whites, whereas black judges gave more balanced sentences.[129] One judge responded by noting that about ninety-eight percent of sentences are the result of plea bargaining and that sentencing is a complicated issue given the various facts involved, thus no two cases can be compared. [130] Some attorneys note that poorer defendants often rely on public defenders who often receive less favorable plea offers than defendants with private counsel because private attorneys have lighter case loads, are less likely to go to trial with prosecutors, and defendants with means are more likely to present mitigating factors. [131]

Another theory proposes that racial inequality in the American criminal justice system is mostly caused by a racial imbalance in decisions to charge criminal defendants with crimes requiring a mandatory minimum prison sentence, leading to large racial disparities in incarceration.[36]


A graph showing the Incarceration rate under state and federal jurisdiction per 100,000 population 1925–2008. It does not include jail inmates. The male incarceration rate is roughly 15 times the female incarceration rate.
In a 2008 self-published paper Paul Heaton from the RAND Corporation and Charles Loeffler wrote, that some scholars and studies have argued that police discrimination is not an important explanation for racial differences in crime, others state that it is the main cause and some argue that both discrimination and different real crime rates contribute. They claim that the varying results can be explained to a large degree by the methods being uncertain with many possible confounding factors. As such Heaton and Loeffler proposed a method that they argue would remove all such observable and unobservable problems. They looked at the arrest rates for assault, robbery, and rape cases where the victims reported a black and white co-offending pair and argue that differences in arrest rates should only reflect police bias. They found that the black offenders were 3% more likely to be arrested. This suggests some bias, but is insufficient to explain the large racial crime disparities.[132]

Childhood exposure to violence[edit]
Research shows that childhood exposure to violence significantly increases the likelihood to engage in violent behavior. When studies control for childhood exposure to violence, black and white males are equally likely to engage in violent behavior.[133]
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29-06-2017, 11:14 AM
Does White Privilege Exist?
(29-06-2017 08:15 AM)tomilay Wrote:  Stevil here exhibits an important example of white privilege, maybe inadvertently, even as he seems to be denying it (or somehow trying to justify it?). The idea that you will be judged, not on the reputation of your race, but as an individual. You are just you, as opposed to a prototype of whiteness.

This "privilege" to be subject to normal standards allows one to make and learn from their mistakes without undermining the reputation of their race. You can be angry, whine, and bitch about nothing without implicating your entire race. You can be great at something and not necessarily have that viewed as a racial positive.

In summary, you get to be yourself and not a representative of your race. You are judged for your actions or crimes, not the actions or crimes of a different individual in your race.

Is that a White privilege or a disadvantage of another race or ethnicity?
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29-06-2017, 11:21 AM (This post was last modified: 29-06-2017 11:25 AM by Emma.)
RE: Does White Privilege Exist?
(29-06-2017 11:14 AM)KUSA Wrote:  
(29-06-2017 08:15 AM)tomilay Wrote:  Stevil here exhibits an important example of white privilege, maybe inadvertently, even as he seems to be denying it (or somehow trying to justify it?). The idea that you will be judged, not on the reputation of your race, but as an individual. You are just you, as opposed to a prototype of whiteness.

This "privilege" to be subject to normal standards allows one to make and learn from their mistakes without undermining the reputation of their race. You can be angry, whine, and bitch about nothing without implicating your entire race. You can be great at something and not necessarily have that viewed as a racial positive.

In summary, you get to be yourself and not a representative of your race. You are judged for your actions or crimes, not the actions or crimes of a different individual in your race.

Is that a White privilege or a disadvantage of another race or ethnicity?

Yes. Tongue

All joking aside, white privilege is the description of the difference between how inherently disadvantaged people of color are compared to white people in their day-to-day life, attitudes, and outlook.

White privilege describes how you, as a white person, do not have to endure the same level of disadvantages of a person of color. And sometimes it manifests itself the attitude that white people have that they do not experience benefits from the whiteness of their skin. Benefits such as getting the benefit of the doubt in tough situations, being viewed as generally more innocent or younger than their peers of color, generally having better experiences in their interactions with law enforcement, etc.

That differential is described for the less-marginalized person as "privilege", because it is something by which the less-marginalized person benefits in their daily life. And that privilege is often viewed by the less-marginalized person as the default and expected, therefore, they do not see it as a privilege- it's their "normal". Whereas from the perspective of the more-marginalized person, it is a privilege not afford them.
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29-06-2017, 11:25 AM
Does White Privilege Exist?
Are Asians considered people of color?
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29-06-2017, 11:26 AM
RE: Does White Privilege Exist?
(29-06-2017 11:25 AM)KUSA Wrote:  Are Asians considered people of color?

Yes. Are you going to suggest to me that Asians do not experience discrimination based on their race?
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29-06-2017, 11:40 AM
RE: Does White Privilege Exist?
(29-06-2017 11:14 AM)KUSA Wrote:  
(29-06-2017 08:15 AM)tomilay Wrote:  Stevil here exhibits an important example of white privilege, maybe inadvertently, even as he seems to be denying it (or somehow trying to justify it?). The idea that you will be judged, not on the reputation of your race, but as an individual. You are just you, as opposed to a prototype of whiteness.

This "privilege" to be subject to normal standards allows one to make and learn from their mistakes without undermining the reputation of their race. You can be angry, whine, and bitch about nothing without implicating your entire race. You can be great at something and not necessarily have that viewed as a racial positive.

In summary, you get to be yourself and not a representative of your race. You are judged for your actions or crimes, not the actions or crimes of a different individual in your race.

Is that a White privilege or a disadvantage of another race or ethnicity?

It is called white privilege. I would not be fixated on the choice of wording(a poor choice in my opinion) as much as the fact that the phenomenon it describes is real. Where one group enjoys a benefit of the doubt, another group endures a deficit of the same. Sometimes with deadly consequences.

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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29-06-2017, 11:43 AM
Does White Privilege Exist?
(29-06-2017 11:26 AM)Emma Wrote:  
(29-06-2017 11:25 AM)KUSA Wrote:  Are Asians considered people of color?

Yes. Are you going to suggest to me that Asians do not experience discrimination based on their race?


Everyone experiences discrimination based on their race even white people.

I dare say that Asians are looked at very favorably as a race though. They don't appear to have these issues you illustrate about other races.

I have a problem with the term "White privilege ". All it does is demonize an entire race. It's looking at every problem the wrong way.
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