Does detector LIGO work on freewill only?
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12-09-2016, 02:52 AM
RE: Does detector LIGO work on freewill only?
(11-09-2016 06:23 AM)theBorg Wrote:  
(07-09-2016 06:40 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  Someone who has severe brain damage and cannot make any decisions for themselves?...
Define freewill.
Then the things are just more complicated, that does not debunk my definition. I just modify it: Life is the potential to make the free actions, the sick person can miraculously get healthy (the resurrection), so he is also alive. Dead bodies in the grave will be resurrected, so the death of the bodies is temporary.

The free action can not be predicted with absolute certainty. The double slit experiment, a photon hits the screen, its impact place is uncertain. If this is the True Uncertainty, then the Freewill of the True God directs the photon.

My point is that your definition starts to break down if you ask such awkward questions. All definitions do, except for one. That is life can be defined as anything in possession of a metabolism. That could include robots.

Any other definition of life that you can come up with will exclude things that are definitely considered alive.

Free will, which you can't even define, has nothing to do with life. Things can be alive without free will.

Now if your god is the first thing alive, then this means that god your must have a metabolism. And if so, that also means that your god is in accordance with the laws of Thermodynamics and is not omnipotent, omniscience or omnipresent. i.e. it's not a god.
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12-09-2016, 11:05 AM (This post was last modified: 12-09-2016 11:08 AM by theBorg.)
RE: Does detector LIGO work on freewill only?
(12-09-2016 02:52 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  1) your definition starts to break down...
2) Free will, which you can't even define,
Stop making the hypnosis on me! 1) in your imagination, 2) I can and I did.
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12-09-2016, 12:01 PM (This post was last modified: 12-09-2016 12:09 PM by Gloucester.)
RE: Does detector LIGO work on freewill only?
Borgie, the measuring thing is actually quite simple, well, to anyone able to accept and understand a little science. Those who are of too little intelligence or have total tunnel vision may have trouble.

View light in its wave form persona, ignore the particulate photons for this attempt to explain things.

Establish a coherent, single colour, single frequency and, therefore, single wave length source of light that projects a narrow, parallel, beam. Call it a ''laser''.

Shine this laser along a pipe (so it is protected from external influences in the atomosphere) that is, say, a billion of those wave lengths of that colour light long.

Place a detector, a very sensitive detector, at the far end of the pipe.

Initially, the detector may ''see'' either a peak of that wave, a place of full brightness, or it may see the point at which that wave pattern passes zero, a ''dark'' place, or somewhere between.

If brightness is seen adjust the detector along the beam path until it ''sees'' darkness.

Now, those light waves are incredibly short, in the order of nanometers, maybe 100 nanometers or 0.0000001 metres in length. (If I have counted my zeros correctly!)

So, if I were to move that detector by even 1 nanometer, 0.000000001 meters, the output of that detector would change from dark to a bit brighter since it was now ''seeing'' part of the way up the wave pattern towards a peak.

Move the detector back to the cark place and leave it all alone.

Should an external force now move that detector, by squashing or stretching the containing pipe along its length say, the change in light level will indicate how far the detector was moved.

This is a crude system, make the pipe longer and the stretching/squashing is greater, the change in point in measuring the light wave is further up the brightness slope.

Or the pipe can be kept the same length and the beam ''folded'', bounced, back and forth between mirrors to increase its effective length.

As said, this is crude and not so accurate. If you split the beam into two, send one along the pipe, bounce it off a mirror straight back again and compare it with the other half of the split beam the sensitivity is increased.

Move that mirror back of forth in the direction of the beam and you change the length of the beam. You therefore change the output from the detector.

Do the same but ''fold'' the beam several times between mirrors (so it is actually several times longer than the pipe now) and the sensitivity is even more enhanced.

So, if those pipes are 4km long and the beam is ''folded'' ten times within the pipes the actual beam length is 40km. Think of a piece of string wound between to nails a metre apart, you can get ten metres of string on there easily, but the nails are still 1 metre apart. Not analogous to the laser beam but demonstrating the concept of ''folding''.

Make all the parts to the highest possible standard, ensure no local conditions can affect the system, or find ways to cancel their effects, and you have an instrument capable of measuring incredibly tiny distances of movement in those mirrors at the ends of the pipes.

If the mirrors are fairly heavy, still only grams probably, and allowed to swing a little they will be affected by gravity. Place two of these devices some distance apart and if they both give the same results then the cause is not local to either of them. Something, somewhere, that was big enough to influence both systems occurred.

The science is quite simple, the mechanical engineering is incredible, but the design of the experiment and its mechanical components is even more incredible to this simple technician!

Might attempt some graphics later.

Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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12-09-2016, 08:56 PM
RE: Does detector LIGO work on freewill only?
(12-09-2016 12:01 PM)Gloucester Wrote:  Borgie, the measuring thing is actually quite simple, well, to anyone able to accept and understand a little science.
Simple? I looked at the detector design in the main paper (the Physical Review Letters): it is the true wonder of the human creativity.
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