Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
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19-07-2012, 03:11 PM (This post was last modified: 19-07-2012 03:17 PM by kingschosen.)
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
(19-07-2012 01:17 PM)Buddy Christ Wrote:  And now people are so attached to their cars, they drive 2 blocks over to the store.

Society still functions; more effectively and more efficiently to boot.

Quote:And now we sit around glued to them, watching "reality" shows about socialite hookers with their daddy's money while life passes us by.

Sometimes there's a good reason to complain.

What you consider enjoyable doesn't govern someones opinion. To some people, that's better than sex. It may be crazy, but it gives them joy, so who are you to judge?


Quote:There's nothing wrong with the technology itself. But human beings are shallow, vain creatures and new technology makes it more apparent. I hold out to set an example that we don't need to clutch our phones until our knuckles are white, checking it every 5 seconds in a pathetic need to validate their existence.

Again, what you consider unimportant is important to others. You may call this pathetic in the same way that others would call you pretentious and narcissistic. It may not be true, but it really depends on who is doing the viewing.


Quote:There have always been ways to exploit games to win, while ruining the game for both players in the process.

Exploit? You mean play within the parameters of the game that the designers and testers allowed? That's not exploiting. That's being the better player. The only way to cheat is to hack the game and do something that is against the game's original design.

Crying "sploitz" is just that. Crying. If you can't beat someone playing within the game's parameters, then take your loss and move on or adapt and adopt. Refusal to adapt and adopt is on you. Faulting another person for doing so is fundamentally wrong in competition.

Let's examine this premise in the real world:

American Football
The "Hide-out" play
A receiver "hides out" by their own team's sideline while the offense lines up on the far side of field. The receiver appears to be out of bounds but is really in bounds. Once the ball is hiked the receiver runs down the sideline unnoticed. The quarterback throws the ball to the unnoticed receiver for a large gain or a touchdown.

Was this illegal? No
Was it wrong? No
Was it cheap? No
The offensive team followed the rules of the game and used a tool to gain an advantage.

Quote:Crouching in a corner spamming kick may increase your win rate, but it's boring and removes all the fun.

To whom? You? Probably. To the other person? Probably not. What you consider "fun" has no bearing on what someone else considers fun.

Quote:What I'm hearing is that we should just do whatever is best for ourselves, and to hell with everyone else.

If it's not "against the rules" then yes. Keep in mind though, that there are no moral and ethical rules within competitive sports or games. They are governed by the rules themselves. If you choose to follow your own moral and ethical code in a game or sport, then you cannot fault your opponent for "exploiting" your weakness.

Quote:Answer your phone loudly in a crowded room. Text while walking into traffic and then glare at whoever dares to almost hit you.

This is hardly the same as gaming. Social norms and etiquette govern these types of situations as well as safety. These situations don't have the rigid parameters as a game or sport. Life =/= fantasy

Quote:And exploit every game so that it's better for you.

Again, you need to change your mindset as to what is "exploiting". Playing by the rules isn't exploiting. If someone plays by the rules better than you and you lose and complain, you're a sore loser.

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19-07-2012, 07:57 PM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
Consider Starcraft 2 and cannon rushing (don't know if you play). There is a method that is easy to do called cannon rushing, where you can win the game before the first fighting units are even built. Anyone can do it, but it's considered "bad manner." If the goal is simply to win, then everyone should be doing this all the time. But it ruins the gaming experience. Developers are unaware of things like this until a bunch of people constantly do it and threaten their game sales (consider MW2's noob tubing with One Man Army), and patches to fix it take a while to come out.

This is why game tournaments usually ban things like this, so that the game can be played the way it's supposed to.

The football example isn't the same thing because it's a risky maneuver that can easily be defended after one time. This isn't something you can keep doing to win. This isn't en exploit.

Like Louis says, we live in a culture of "hey you get to do this... I'M GONNA DO IT!" People hear what someone else is telling them to be trendy and they go overboard with it, like they're desperate to be accepted. Is that the morally/socially superior thing to do? That is the original question.

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20-07-2012, 12:26 AM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
I LOVE TECHNOLOGY AND FOLLOW THE MASSES!!! I sleep with my iPhone and camera on my nightstand. True story. iPhone is an alarm clock though. Camera, I worship it.
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20-07-2012, 12:29 AM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
Does never answering my phone and hardly ever making any calls make me a better person than all ya'alls?

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
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20-07-2012, 12:37 AM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
(20-07-2012 12:29 AM)Erxomai Wrote:  Does never answering my phone and hardly ever making any calls make me a better person than all ya'alls?
No

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20-07-2012, 12:44 AM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
(20-07-2012 12:37 AM)aurora Wrote:  
(20-07-2012 12:29 AM)Erxomai Wrote:  Does never answering my phone and hardly ever making any calls make me a better person than all ya'alls?
No

Oh

It was just a fucking apple man, we're sorry okay? Please stop the madness Laugh out load
~Izel
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20-07-2012, 12:46 AM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
(18-07-2012 09:10 PM)Buddy Christ Wrote:  I've always been that guy who doesn't carry his cell phone with him or use Twitter. My phone is still a flip open, not a 600 dollar mini-laptop the size of a phone. And when I leave the house I never take my phone with me (unless its a long drive, emergency purposes) and I delight in how freaked that makes people. "You don't have your phone on you?? Why?" I've always been proud of my resistance to what I consider vanities. I use facebook not to inform others of my mundane activities, but just to post the same stuff I post on here so I can debate with people. Things like twitter absolutely baffle me. Why would anyone care about what anyone else had for breakfast or where they are shopping?

Am I correct in my attitude, though? I can't stand people at concerts recording through 5.4 megapixel phones instead of just using their eyes and being in the moment. In college, I was constantly distracted by other people's texts which I'm sure were as important as, "Lol Bryce, I'm so totally going to Jimmy Johns later." Should the preferred method be moderation (as with all things in life, imo)? Or is this just another resistance to trends? The majority seems to constantly be in the wrong these days. Music is dominated by Disney clones and fabricated idols. Movies pander to Twilight tweens. Top seller book lists seem to be monopolized with "Shades of Grey" type Oprah selections and Chicken Soup for the Unoriginal Soul. I've always found that the underrated and undiscovered things are much better quality than the socially accepted ones, and maybe this phone business is just an offspring of that behavior.

Regardless, now I appear to be rambling. Get off your damn phone.



Sub-question. What if in the future, our technology surpasses real life. We have this virtual reality of vivid "realism" that can't be duplicated in real life. Is it still better to try to live in the real world when the virtual world has more to offer? Sort of a Surrogates movie moral question. Is a fantasy world offering you a better reality actually better than wrinkles, age spots, and brutal lessons of life?
Old Woof, he don't own a mobile phone or know how to use one.
I used to be a real luddite; now I can see a lot of good in technology.
Sadly the abuse of such, as you indicate, may well usher in damning repercussions. Shocking
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20-07-2012, 07:41 AM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
(19-07-2012 07:57 PM)Buddy Christ Wrote:  Consider Starcraft 2 and cannon rushing (don't know if you play). There is a method that is easy to do called cannon rushing, where you can win the game before the first fighting units are even built. Anyone can do it, but it's considered "bad manner." If the goal is simply to win, then everyone should be doing this all the time. But it ruins the gaming experience. Developers are unaware of things like this until a bunch of people constantly do it and threaten their game sales (consider MW2's noob tubing with One Man Army), and patches to fix it take a while to come out.

I don't play. But, I get the gist of what you're saying. MK9 has been patched several times to fix problems that the devs missed. Kabal used to have a stun infinite that caused chip blocking until you were dead. You either ate a 30% combo or ate a 100% chip block infinite. The terrible part is that if you ate the 30% combo there was a big chance the combo could be restarted if the you blocked immediately after your recovery.

I had this happen to me a couple of times. After I lost, I just simply chose to not fight that person again. Sure, it was annoying, but it was just "part" of the game. I just shrugged and let it be. Soon, though, the devs patched this. Not that it really mattered... Kabal remained S+ tier.

Quote:This is why game tournaments usually ban things like this, so that the game can be played the way it's supposed to.

Again, tournaments have rigid rules. They have fixed parameters that the contestants agree upon. Outside tournaments there are no hard rules except the parameters governed by the game itself.

MK example (sorry... I just know MK). Kratos and Kratos' stage are banned from tournament play because they are PS3 exclusives. It wouldn't be fair the the 360 players. This is a hard rule set up by the tournament organizers that everyone understands and is forced to follow or else be removed from the tournament. Again, hard parameters.

Quote:The football example isn't the same thing because it's a risky maneuver that can easily be defended after one time. This isn't something you can keep doing to win. This isn't en exploit.

But it can be used to win. Spamming can be easily defended against as well. It's just that people don't take the time to try and do it; it's easier to whine and complain than to find an effective way to counter it.

Kano is the spam king. His upball and knives are quick, easy, and give an insane framerate advantage; however, if you know a Kano spammer, you know how to defend against the upball. A blocked upball (which is easy to do) opens Kano up for massive punishment.

I used to hate fighting Kano until I took the time to learn him. Now, I just laugh at Kano spammers and pound them into the ground with counters.

Quote:Like Louis says, we live in a culture of "hey you get to do this... I'M GONNA DO IT!" People hear what someone else is telling them to be trendy and they go overboard with it, like they're desperate to be accepted. Is that the morally/socially superior thing to do? That is the original question.

Is that really so bad? I mean, if someones self esteem relies on being accepted and trendy, is it such a crime that they act that way?

Sure it may annoy you, but your personal annoyance shouldn't govern someones personal joy.

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21-07-2012, 03:45 AM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
Always have my phone, it’s my GPS and it can tell me to turn here or there via my earplugs, it’s my camera and my MP3 player, I can jump on the net to find nearby services, I can download a book onto it to read or play games on it if bored.
I can be reached in an emergency and I can call for help if I need to and I can give them an exact address if I’m on some back road.
My wife can track me with it in case I don’t show up, she will know where I am.
I can track and turn off my bike if it goes missing and my home will call me if the alarm triggers.
It’s a photo album and a voice recorder, my clock, alarm and diary.
I use it as a calculator and conversion table.
I can send and receive emails, order pizza and pay bills.
It is even a torch when I need it to be!

Mindful of others I will take a call outside and I can ignore a text alert without having a breakdown.
People have put so much in such a small package; of all the new technology that is available the smart phones are by far my favourite, just such an impressive piece of equipment that can do so much.
I really want the new Samsung S3! But that’s a $1,000 I don’t have just sitting around.
I’m quite keen on learning how to convert a computer program to an application, I’ll be able to tune my bike via my phone and get live data if I can do that.

So no, not better, just have a different point of view on mobiles than me.

A casual stroll through the lunatic asylum shows that faith does not prove anything. Friedrich Nietzsche
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21-07-2012, 06:16 AM
RE: Does not being attached to my phone make me a better person than you?
I use a 7" tablet (Huawei mediapad) as my phone these days. I rarely make calls, so having a bigger screen helps with the basic functions I used it most for: Keeping in touch via facebook and twitter.

Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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