Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
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28-09-2015, 03:55 PM (This post was last modified: 28-09-2015 04:01 PM by The Germans are coming.)
Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
I usualy hate word definition games but cant help to play this one and hope to read your opinions on this.

With recent events I have repeatedly heard and read the word "islamophobia" over and over and over again and I personaly believe that this word doesnt even make sence. A phobia is a completly irrational fear with the emphasis being on irrational. I have Acrophobia which is fear of hights and at a hight of arround 2 meters I start getting scared of falling down, eventhough such a fall would definatly not kill or even hurt me. As such the fear is irrational because there is no valid reason to be affraid. All other phobias are also deeply irrational.
Tight spaces, a kitchen mouse, a spider, thunder, flying a plane, clowns, dentists, dogs and many other things of which there are phobias are things that tend not to kill or even harm you. Which is why a phobia is an irrational fear. The fear doesnt come out of a thought process, but out of the subconciousness and it might even overwrite what our instinct tells us to do, as such since it has nothing to do with active thought mud the subconcious taking over our actions - it is more of a medical condition or character disorder. One additional thing you may have noticed is that at some point there must have been a political conflation of terms. The word phobia is almoust completly used in a medical context to describe the psychological condition of a person with an irrational fear of something. At some point some ass must have decided to use the word in a political context to either describe an opponents position as a medical condition or to sound smart.

Islamic fanatics do tend to kill you... Thats just a simple fact.

I do not doubt for a second that there are people out there who violently hate muslims and have the intention to inflict harm on muslims for biggoted reasons. But those views and possible crimes are not the result of an irrational fear that can be seen as a medical conditions, it`s the result of hatred. And hating is done conciously. There is a reason why we say racism and antisemitism and not racephobia and jewphobia. I believe that the people who use the word "islamophobia" are fully aware of this and therefor use the word intentionaly to throw secularists, critics of islam, critics of islamism, critics of islamic theocracy and simple mindet biggots into the same bucket to create the impression as if there was no difference between any of them.

So I would say, the word "Islamophobia" is a "unword"... It`s a term that doesnt make sence and it would be better to replace it with one that makes more sence and doesnt generalise an entire set of people with completly different views for flawed political reasons.

The Greek word for "hatred of" is "-misia"* so the correct term to describe a biggot who hates or inflicts harm on muslims for racist and theocratic reasons would be better served to be "Islammisia" than the nonsence word "Islamophobia".

What say you?



It has been a decade since I had greek lessons so forgive me if I am wrong.

PS: The word homophobia I believe also makes no sence. "Irrational fear of gays"...... lol. Unlikely. I unfortunatly dont know what the greek word for "closeted" is.

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29-09-2015, 01:54 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
According to merriam-webster phobia is also extreme dislike so it's fit.

I also can see some (small?) part of fear in behaviours described by these words - homophobe will fear about gays "converting" his children or if he is closeted about stirring want in him while islamophobe will fear for example about contamination of culture.

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29-09-2015, 02:02 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
English doesn't stick to Greek defs. Sure, root is "fear of". Meanings change over time. Homophobia has come to mean "hatred of" - it's not something we can control, meanings change over time.

Islamophobia... I think it is deliberately sensationalised by Muslim leaders who should know better - similar to how Christians love to throw around the idea that they are 'persecuted'. But... I mean, that's how it is. If someone's convinced that they are being persecuted (e.g. by being sent to jail for refusing to do their government job), then there's not a lot you can say that will convince them otherwise.

That being said, there are some cases where the word actually applies IMO, like that one a few months ago when that guy killed the Muslim students over parking space. It's difficult because there's a lot of room for interpretation as well, like, that particular incident could be called racism too.

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29-09-2015, 02:11 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
According to Wikipedia:

History of the term[edit]
One early use cited as the term's first use is by the painter Alphonse Étienne Dinet and Algerian intellectual Sliman ben Ibrahim in their 1918 biography of Islam's prophet Muhammad.[57][58] Writing in French, they used the term islamophobie. Robin Richardson writes that in the English version of the book the word was not translated as "Islamophobia" but rather as "feelings inimical to Islam". Dahou Ezzerhouni has cited several other uses in French as early as 1910, and from 1912 to 1918.[59] These early uses of the term did not, according to Christopher Allen, have the same meaning as in contemporary usage, as they described a fear of Islam by liberal Muslims and Muslim feminists, rather than a fear or dislike/hatred of Muslims by non-Muslims.[58][60] On the other hand, Fernando Bravo Lopez argues that Dinet and ibn Sliman's use of the term was as a criticism of overly hostile attitudes to Islam by a Belgian orientalist, Henri Lammens, whose project they saw as a "'pseudo-scientific crusade in the hope of bringing Islam down once and for all.'" He also notes that an early definition of Islamophobia appears in the Ph.D. thesis of Alain Quellien, a French colonial bureaucrat:
For some, the Muslim is the natural and irreconcilable enemy of the Christian and the European; Islam is the negation of civilization, and barbarism, bad faith and cruelty are the best one can expect from the Mohammedans.
Furthermore, he notes that Quellien's work draws heavily on the work of the French colonial department's 1902-06 administrator, who published a work in 1906, which to a great extent mirrors John Esposito's The Islamic Threat: Myth or Reality?.[61]
The first recorded use of the term in English, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, was in 1923 in an article in The Journal of Theological Studies.[3] The term entered into common usage with the publication of the Runnymede Trust's report in 1997.[62] Kofi Annan asserted at a 2004 conference entitled "Confronting Islamophobia" that the word Islamophobia had to be coined in order to "take account of increasingly widespread bigotry"


According to the Atlantic:

When I recently asked Sam Harris what he thought of the word 'Islamophobia,' he directed me to a tweet that noted the following: “Islamophobia. A word created by fascists, & used by cowards, to manipulate morons.”

“I don’t think [the tweet] overstates the case by much,” said Harris, the atheist author whose sweeping critique of Islam (and the "meme of Islamophobia") on Real Time With Bill Maher has sparked a broader debate about Islamophobia—both the phenomenon and the term itself—in the age of ISIS and Islamist politics.

“Islam is not a race, ethnicity, or nationality: It’s a set of ideas," Harris told me. "Criticism of these ideas should never be confused with an animus toward people. And yet it is. I’m convinced that this is often done consciously, strategically, and quite cynically as a means of shutting down conversation [on] important topics.”

Some chart the popularization of the term 'Islamophobia" back to a series of studies in the 1990s by the Runnymede Trust, a left-leaning British think tank. A 1997 reported entitled “Islamophobia: A Challenge for Us All” documented “closed” views of Islam in the U.K., including perceptions of the religion as a single bloc that is barbaric, sexist, and engaged in terrorist activities.

But Robin Richardson, who edited the Runnymede report and currently works for the educational consultancy Insted, maintains that the think tank simply borrowed the term from previous usage. In a recent paper, he traces the phrase to Alain Quellien's use of the French word islamophobie in 1910 to criticize French colonial administrators for their treatment of Muslim subjects.

Richardson claims that post-colonial theorist Edward Said was the first to use the word in English, when he wrote in 1985 about “‘the connection … between Islamophobia and antisemitism’ and criticized writers who do not recognize that ‘hostility to Islam in the modern Christian West has historically gone hand in hand’ with antisemitism and ‘has stemmed from the same source and been nourished at the same stream.’”

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Bill Maher's Dangerous Critique of Islam

“In its earliest historical usage, the term ‘Islamophobia’ described prejudice and hostility towards Muslims—not an ‘irrational fear of Islam,’” Nathan Lean, author of The Islamophobia Industry, told me. “Critics of the term often lambast it on the basis of an etymological deficiency, insisting that it thwarts the possibility of critiquing Islam as a religion while simultaneously suggesting the presence of a mental disorder on the part of those who do.”

“Religions differ, and their specific differences matter,” Harris explained. “And the truth is that Islam has doctrines regarding jihad, martyrdom, apostasy, etc., that pose a special problem to the civilized world at this moment in history.”


Quick Google search.

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29-09-2015, 03:06 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
What is a rational fear, as opposed to an irrational fear?

Is there a term for 'wary of politicised ideologies'? I'd plead guilty to that.

Consider

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29-09-2015, 03:20 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
(29-09-2015 03:06 AM)DLJ Wrote:  What is a rational fear, as opposed to an irrational fear?

Is there a term for 'wary of politicised ideologies'? I'd plead guilty to that.

Consider

It depends upon where the bomb explodes. Wink

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29-09-2015, 06:00 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
(29-09-2015 03:06 AM)DLJ Wrote:  What is a rational fear, as opposed to an irrational fear?

Is there a term for 'wary of politicised ideologies'? I'd plead guilty to that.

Consider

An irrational fear is being afraid of black men.

A rational fear is being afraid of black men who are firing AK-47's at you.

.......................................

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29-09-2015, 06:56 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
Like others have mentioned before, islamophobia is a very legitimate term, if sometimes over used. It express itself relatively regularly in various countries by a sense of dread at Muslim cultural markers which are by themselves completely inoffensive like minaret, Arab men with lots of facial hair or halal food. It’s also linked to a fear of anything that looks like a Muslim even if it’s not one for example Copt and Maronite Christian look like Muslim because of their ethnicity and cultural heritage, but aren't and yet just has feared. Islamophobia is just like xenophobia, but slightly more precise.
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29-09-2015, 09:07 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
(28-09-2015 03:55 PM)The Germans are coming Wrote:  So I would say, the word "Islamophobia" is a "unword"... It`s a term that doesnt make sence and it would be better to replace it with one that makes more sence and doesnt generalise an entire set of people with completly different views for flawed political reasons.

PS: The word homophobia I believe also makes no sence. "Irrational fear of gays"...... lol. Unlikely. I unfortunatly dont know what the greek word for "closeted" is.

All of our languages would be dramatically poorer if all etymologies were reduced to simple-minded, narrow literalism.

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29-09-2015, 10:14 AM
RE: Does the word "Islamophobia" make any sence?
Also, just wanted to add: a fall from two meters can indeed hurt or in certain instances kill you.
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