Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
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11-10-2013, 01:52 PM
Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
As an atheist, I sometimes study the Bible to help prepare myself for any unplanned debates I might have with any ardent theists that cross my paths.
This verse has come to my attention lately after I reread it and actually noticed what Paul is actually saying. The first time I read it I was facepalming myself for Paul comparing homosexuality and fornication to slave traders and murderers, but now, after rereading it I think Paul is also suggesting atheism be outlawed completely:

Quote:1 Timothy 1:8-11
New International Version (NIV)
8 We know that the law is good if one uses it properly. 9 We also know that the law is made not for the righteous but for lawbreakers and rebels, the ungodly and sinful, the unholy and irreligious, for those who kill their fathers or mothers, for murderers, 10 for the sexually immoral, for those practicing homosexuality, for slave traders and liars and perjurers—and for whatever else is contrary to the sound doctrine 11 that conforms to the gospel concerning the glory of the blessed God, which he entrusted to me.


The "ungodly" and "irreligious," - I think Paul of Tarsus is actually suggesting atheists be outlawed.
I'm just not sure. Does anyone here have any other ideas about what it means?

"There is a circle here that links us to one another: we each want to be happy; the social feeling of love is one of our greatest sources of happiness; and love entails that we be concerned for the happiness of others. We discover that we can be selfish together."
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11-10-2013, 02:07 PM
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
surely, not that it means anything new. Atheism is usually considered a sin in the big religions, so it wouldn't be surprising they wanted to outlaw atheism if it were up to them

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11-10-2013, 02:16 PM
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
lol NIV.

Irreligious there = "profane" per the Greek.

Source

Used the NASB for a more accurate translation. NIV is garbage.

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11-10-2013, 02:18 PM
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
The law is not a legal matter, its the made up rules of Paul's god.
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11-10-2013, 02:19 PM
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
(11-10-2013 01:52 PM)Chase Wrote:  As an atheist, I sometimes study the Bible to help prepare myself for any unplanned debates I might have with any ardent theists that cross my paths.
This verse has come to my attention lately after I reread it and actually noticed what Paul is actually saying. The first time I read it I was facepalming myself for Paul comparing homosexuality and fornication to slave traders and murderers, but now, after rereading it I think Paul is also suggesting atheism be outlawed completely:

Quote:1 Timothy 1:8-11
New International Version (NIV)
8 We know that the law is good if one uses it properly. 9 We also know that the law is made not for the righteous but for lawbreakers and rebels, the ungodly and sinful, the unholy and irreligious, for those who kill their fathers or mothers, for murderers, 10 for the sexually immoral, for those practicing homosexuality, for slave traders and liars and perjurers—and for whatever else is contrary to the sound doctrine 11 that conforms to the gospel concerning the glory of the blessed God, which he entrusted to me.


The "ungodly" and "irreligious," - I think Paul of Tarsus is actually suggesting atheists be outlawed.
I'm just not sure. Does anyone here have any other ideas about what it means?

Here's the thing about Saul of Tarsus, if you did not accept what he said as the absolute truth and follow him...you were ungodly.


God is a concept by which we measure our pain -- John Lennon

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11-10-2013, 02:22 PM
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
(11-10-2013 02:19 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  
(11-10-2013 01:52 PM)Chase Wrote:  As an atheist, I sometimes study the Bible to help prepare myself for any unplanned debates I might have with any ardent theists that cross my paths.
This verse has come to my attention lately after I reread it and actually noticed what Paul is actually saying. The first time I read it I was facepalming myself for Paul comparing homosexuality and fornication to slave traders and murderers, but now, after rereading it I think Paul is also suggesting atheism be outlawed completely:



The "ungodly" and "irreligious," - I think Paul of Tarsus is actually suggesting atheists be outlawed.
I'm just not sure. Does anyone here have any other ideas about what it means?

Here's the thing about Saul of Tarsus, if you did not accept what he said as the absolute truth and follow him...you were ungodly.

I can't speak with complete authority but I think Paul may have earned a Shoo Fly if he crossed your path.Drinking Beverage

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11-10-2013, 02:29 PM
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
(11-10-2013 02:16 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  lol NIV.

Irreligious there = "profane" per the Greek.

Source

Used the NASB for a more accurate translation. NIV is garbage.

What's your take, sir, on "the ungodly" in the same verse in the NASB?

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11-10-2013, 02:30 PM
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
(11-10-2013 02:22 PM)KidCharlemagne1962 Wrote:  
(11-10-2013 02:19 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  Here's the thing about Saul of Tarsus, if you did not accept what he said as the absolute truth and follow him...you were ungodly.

I can't speak with complete authority but I think Paul may have earned a Shoo Fly if he crossed your path.Drinking Beverage

Yes, most assuredly. In fact one of my ansestors is probably the reason he hated women and wanted to keep us silent.


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11-10-2013, 02:39 PM
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
(11-10-2013 02:29 PM)PleaseJesus Wrote:  
(11-10-2013 02:16 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  lol NIV.

Irreligious there = "profane" per the Greek.

Source

Used the NASB for a more accurate translation. NIV is garbage.

What's your take, sir, on "the ungodly" in the same verse in the NASB?

ἀσεβέσιν

It's not talking about an atheist.

An atheist cannot have contempt, scorn, or be destitute of reverential awe towards something that they don't believe exists.

The ungodly references those that believe in the supernatural but do not believe in God aka pagans. Most everyone believed in something during that time, so it is in reference towards those that were irreverent to God while believing in another god.

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11-10-2013, 05:15 PM (This post was last modified: 11-10-2013 05:49 PM by Mark Fulton.)
RE: Does this Bible verse imply Paul of Tarsus wanted to outlaw atheism?
Firstly, Paul didn't write this. It was written by someone anonymous using Paul's name.

The "law" the author is talking about is the Jewish law, as written in the Torah. By the time this was written, probably in the second century, Jews were very much "on the nose." They'd started two large wars against the empire, so were considered trouble causers. Hence those who obeyed "the law" where to be made fun of and ridiculed and degraded.

Christianity, the new religious kid on the block, was now the real religion, and this letter is just Christian, anti Jewish propaganda.

PS. The same anti-Jewish pro Christian propaganda can be found littered throughout the book of Acts, where it's implied Jews are hypocrites and murderers. It's actually quite embarrassingly pathetic.
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