Dog help
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
08-09-2017, 08:00 AM
Dog help
Not sure if this is the best place to post this but I couldn't see a pets section. I know a fair amount of members have extensive experience with dogs so thought I would see if anyone has any advice.

I have a 3 year old blue healer (Loki), came from rescue a year ago. This past week my kids have returned to school so I brought Loki with us to drop them off. He seems to enjoy his car rides because when the kids are getting ready to go with shoes, backpacks etc. he gets excited jumping around by the door and once we go outside he runs straight to the van and hops right in. Problem is once we start driving he immediately begins whining and doing a high pitched yelp-what I would assume are signs of anxiety or agitation. He also bounces around from seat to seat.

I'd like to get him to just sit in the passenger seat and enjoy the ride. I'm not sure if I just need to keep doing it with him and hope the continued exposure to the routine will help him to settle down or if there is anything we can do to move it along with him. I think he wants to go with us because the times when we do leave him home he watches us from the windows and yelps and carries on until we are gone. Anyone have any experience with something like this?
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-09-2017, 08:05 AM
RE: Dog help
Sounds like our dog! She is high anxiety but has terrible separation anxiety, so she rides in the car because she is desperate to be with us. But she either crunches down between the seats or bounces around. We have brought her bed in the car from time to time and she seems to consider that her 'home base' and she feels comfortable there which calms her anxiety. Not sure if that's something you can try?

"If you don't have a seat at the table, you're probably on the menu."

[Image: parodia-michal-aniol-flying-spaghetti-monster.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-09-2017, 08:11 AM (This post was last modified: 08-09-2017 08:18 AM by Dom.)
RE: Dog help
Do not allow the bouncing. It is also an attention getting thing, and I bet you are giving her exactly what she wants for it. Pick a seat you want her to permanently travel in and wrap a leash around and snap it. Has to be short so she cannot get off that spot. You'll get sound effects at first, but if you ignore it, she will be a perfect traveler after just a few trips.

Of course if you have crazy loud bouncy kids in the car - it's not going to work well because she'll feed off their energy.

The dog in this case is NOT in distress. She is just doing what has always worked to get her attention.

I have owned and trained dogs all my life (and I am old), including police training. Dogs are my favorite people, and a well behaved dog is tons happier because the way s/he sees it, s/he can manipulate you by behaving certain ways. So, don't ever forget to immediately praise good behavior. Also, don't assume the dog knows what you want - always assume they don't. And my pet peeve - dogs do NOT EVER look guilty. Guilt is a man made concept. When you assume the dog looks guilty, s/he is scared and/or depressed because s/he senses that you are upset with them.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like Dom's post
08-09-2017, 08:17 AM
RE: Dog help
I second the bed ^

That or maybe a thunder jacket?

But then, some dogs are just nervous wrecks in cars no matter what you do. My last dog Juneau would leave the backseats slathered in a rainbow sheen from nervous drooling and panting. Even doggy Xanax did nothing for her.

I would try the bed first. It'll at least make it more comfortable.

Ignorance is not to be ignored.

Check out my DA gallery! http://oo-kiri-oo.deviantart.com/gallery/
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-09-2017, 08:21 AM
RE: Dog help
(08-09-2017 08:17 AM)Loom Wrote:  I second the bed ^

That or maybe a thunder jacket?

But then, some dogs are just nervous wrecks in cars no matter what you do. My last dog Juneau would leave the backseats slathered in a rainbow sheen from nervous drooling and panting. Even doggy Xanax did nothing for her.

I would try the bed first. It'll at least make it more comfortable.

Yes, marking the spot where she is to remain put with a bed is always good practice, in the car and everywhere else, too.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-09-2017, 08:22 AM
RE: Dog help
(08-09-2017 08:11 AM)Dom Wrote:  Do not allow the bouncing. It is also an attention getting thing, and I bet you are giving her exactly what she wants for it. Pick a seat you want her to permanently travel in and wrap a leash around and snap it. Has to be short so she cannot get off that spot. You'll get sound effects at first, but if you ignore it, she will be a perfect traveler after just a few trips.

Of course if you have crazy loud bouncy kids in the car - it's not going to work well because she'll feed off their energy.

The dog in this case is NOT in distress. She is just doing what has always worked to get her attention.

Kids are pretty mellow in the mornings on the way to school. My daughter will pet him and try to soothe him if he goes next to her and I have suspected that it makes him worse. I will try tying leash to the passenger seat for next week.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-09-2017, 08:29 AM
RE: Dog help
(08-09-2017 08:22 AM)Jedi Rainbow Dash Wrote:  
(08-09-2017 08:11 AM)Dom Wrote:  Do not allow the bouncing. It is also an attention getting thing, and I bet you are giving her exactly what she wants for it. Pick a seat you want her to permanently travel in and wrap a leash around and snap it. Has to be short so she cannot get off that spot. You'll get sound effects at first, but if you ignore it, she will be a perfect traveler after just a few trips.

Of course if you have crazy loud bouncy kids in the car - it's not going to work well because she'll feed off their energy.

The dog in this case is NOT in distress. She is just doing what has always worked to get her attention.

Kids are pretty mellow in the mornings on the way to school. My daughter will pet him and try to soothe him if he goes next to her and I have suspected that it makes him worse. I will try tying leash to the passenger seat for next week.

Petting and soothing him is rewarding him for the bad behavior. It's giving him what he wants and why he hops right into the car. Fun, fun, fun!

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Dom's post
08-09-2017, 10:50 AM
RE: Dog help
As long as I let my dog stick his head out the window he's fine.
But he does go ape shit if he sees another dog when he's in the car.

[Image: anigif_enhanced-26851-1450298712-2.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-09-2017, 11:34 AM (This post was last modified: 08-09-2017 11:39 AM by adey67.)
RE: Dog help
(08-09-2017 08:00 AM)Jedi Rainbow Dash Wrote:  Not sure if this is the best place to post this but I couldn't see a pets section. I know a fair amount of members have extensive experience with dogs so thought I would see if anyone has any advice.

I have a 3 year old blue healer (Loki), came from rescue a year ago. This past week my kids have returned to school so I brought Loki with us to drop them off. He seems to enjoy his car rides because when the kids are getting ready to go with shoes, backpacks etc. he gets excited jumping around by the door and once we go outside he runs straight to the van and hops right in. Problem is once we start driving he immediately begins whining and doing a high pitched yelp-what I would assume are signs of anxiety or agitation. He also bounces around from seat to seat.

I'd like to get him to just sit in the passenger seat and enjoy the ride. I'm not sure if I just need to keep doing it with him and hope the continued exposure to the routine will help him to settle down or if there is anything we can do to move it along with him. I think he wants to go with us because the times when we do leave him home he watches us from the windows and yelps and carries on until we are gone. Anyone have any experience with something like this?

Put the dog in the rear of your car if you have a hatchback, with a dog guard to prevent them jumping over, your dog will be safer than in the front seat and being in a more enclosed area may help calm him down. If your car has only a trunk I personally don't know how to advise you dealing with an animal who has free reign in the back seats other than perhaps a canine equivalent of a cat carrier.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
08-09-2017, 11:54 AM (This post was last modified: 08-09-2017 12:49 PM by Rockblossom.)
RE: Dog help
Your dog needs to be restrained for the same reason kids have safety seats and seat belts - to keep him safe in a crash as well as to stop him from potentially causing a crash by jumping around. Even a little fender bender will send an unrestrained dog crashing into a window. The best way is to use a harness and loop a seat belt through the harness, but you can also use a collar and leash, and loop the leash through a restraint. I like the harness and seatbelt route, because dogs think they are one of the kids, so if they see kids being buckled into seat belts, they are likely (with some complaining) to accept being belted in as well. You could add the harness as part of the kids "getting ready" routine. The passenger seat would not be the best place if there's a passenger-side airbag, though. A back seat or a spot in the back of the van would be better. As others have said, a bed or "designated dog place" in the van would give him a sense that it is his spot, and he would be more likely to calm down.

Automobile Safety items for Dogs
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 5 users Like Rockblossom's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: