Dog whispering woo-hoo
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
01-01-2015, 12:16 PM
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
There are some people that are just better (more attuned maybe) with animals than others. I notice really subtle things about our dogs' behavior that my husband and son don't seem to pick up on.

But I think a lot of it has to do with my being able to read people a lot better than they do too. I pick up on slight facial expressions and voice tone pretty easily while they don't.

There are some slight behavioral issues that I discussed with our vet. I can't seem to correct those behaviors because I can't get husband on board with consistency. So, yeah, it's a people problem not a dog problem. I need to learn how to train the husband. Dodgy

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Anjele's post
01-01-2015, 12:23 PM
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
(01-01-2015 09:24 AM)Dom Wrote:  
(01-01-2015 08:55 AM)bemore Wrote:  This is interesting tech to look at for the future and if its adapted for animals, then it would be cool to see what a dogs dream looks like.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/mind-reader-mee...es-1463094

Well, checking a dog's memory might prove to be disappointing. They appear to have like zero short term memory, and only very repetitive items get stored in permanent memory. They also have an incredible amount of sensory input all the time, and decisions are based on the current sensory input, plus the deeply ingrained repetitive input, plus instinct and hormones etc.

The amazingly detailed sensory perceptions are going to knock our socks off, once recorded. Fido doesn't just smell chicken soup, he smells every ingredient. He doesn't just smell a couch, he smells who sat there when, with whom, what they ate or drank, and increasingly there is evidence that dogs can smell a myriad of illnesses before we can detect them or see symptoms.

Fido knows a whole lot of stuff that we would love to be aware of.

Don't tell this gal that. No




Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Chas's post
01-01-2015, 01:35 PM
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
(01-01-2015 12:23 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(01-01-2015 09:24 AM)Dom Wrote:  Well, checking a dog's memory might prove to be disappointing. They appear to have like zero short term memory, and only very repetitive items get stored in permanent memory. They also have an incredible amount of sensory input all the time, and decisions are based on the current sensory input, plus the deeply ingrained repetitive input, plus instinct and hormones etc.

The amazingly detailed sensory perceptions are going to knock our socks off, once recorded. Fido doesn't just smell chicken soup, he smells every ingredient. He doesn't just smell a couch, he smells who sat there when, with whom, what they ate or drank, and increasingly there is evidence that dogs can smell a myriad of illnesses before we can detect them or see symptoms.

Fido knows a whole lot of stuff that we would love to be aware of.

Don't tell this gal that. No




I've see this dog before. It's amazing. I know some people who aren't as smart as this dog.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-01-2015, 06:20 PM (This post was last modified: 01-01-2015 06:26 PM by Dom.)
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
(01-01-2015 12:23 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(01-01-2015 09:24 AM)Dom Wrote:  Well, checking a dog's memory might prove to be disappointing. They appear to have like zero short term memory, and only very repetitive items get stored in permanent memory. They also have an incredible amount of sensory input all the time, and decisions are based on the current sensory input, plus the deeply ingrained repetitive input, plus instinct and hormones etc.

The amazingly detailed sensory perceptions are going to knock our socks off, once recorded. Fido doesn't just smell chicken soup, he smells every ingredient. He doesn't just smell a couch, he smells who sat there when, with whom, what they ate or drank, and increasingly there is evidence that dogs can smell a myriad of illnesses before we can detect them or see symptoms.

Fido knows a whole lot of stuff that we would love to be aware of.

Don't tell this gal that. No




The dog with the toys learned them one by one, noting differences along the way, with lots of repetition and you can tell he was taught with ample praise at every turn. It doesn't say how long it took, but the initial retrieving of the first toy was surely repeated many times, then the second, then the third, until each became a part of permanent memory because of the repetition. So they taught the dog to think like a human, by integrating lots of things permanently in memory. We then call that intelligent - it is not, it is rote learning. Finding the one object he had never seen or heard of before - that was intelligence.

Drawing from memory is not how dogs normally think, they have each situation as an all new picture, not recalling what happened two minutes ago but drawing more info than we can imagine from the present.

I also think the age old "wisdom" that first the dog needs to know you are the boss isn't exactly right. First the dog needs to know that your input is more important than any other input at all times. There is a difference!!!

Imagine having no short term memory and huge amounts of constant sensory input. We would not know what to pay attention to. A lot of dogs don't know either. They can only do linear logic because they have no short term memory. If dog and person pay attention to each other (has to go both ways) they can do all sorts of things. But - almost all the time it's the dog committing certain behaviors to permanent memory through repetition.

That is how the dog can learn from us. But - it doesn't help us at all to learn from the dog. I would give my right arm to be able to get into a dogs head and perceive everything they do.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-01-2015, 06:38 PM
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
(01-01-2015 06:20 PM)Dom Wrote:  
(01-01-2015 12:23 PM)Chas Wrote:  Don't tell this gal that. No




The dog with the toys learned them one by one, noting differences along the way, with lots of repetition and you can tell he was taught with ample praise at every turn. It doesn't say how long it took, but the initial retrieving of the first toy was surely repeated many times, then the second, then the third, until each became a part of permanent memory because of the repetition. So they taught the dog to think like a human, by integrating lots of things permanently in memory. We then call that intelligent - it is not, it is rote learning. Finding the one object he had never seen or heard of before - that was intelligence.

Drawing from memory is not how dogs normally think, they have each situation as an all new picture, not recalling what happened two minutes ago but drawing more info than we can imagine from the present.

I also think the age old "wisdom" that first the dog needs to know you are the boss isn't exactly right. First the dog needs to know that your input is more important than any other input at all times. There is a difference!!!

Imagine having no short term memory and huge amounts of constant sensory input. We would not know what to pay attention to. A lot of dogs don't know either. They can only do linear logic because they have no short term memory. If dog and person pay attention to each other (has to go both ways) they can do all sorts of things. But - almost all the time it's the dog committing certain behaviors to permanent memory through repetition.

That is how the dog can learn from us. But - it doesn't help us at all to learn from the dog. I would give my right arm to be able to get into a dogs head and perceive everything they do.

A new toy (Einstein doll) was added to a group of a dozen or two that she knew.
She was told to go get "Einstein". She successfully retrieved it.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-01-2015, 06:42 PM
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
(01-01-2015 11:56 AM)Stark Raving Wrote:  Caesar Milan uses the phrase "dog whisperer" as a canine twist on "horse whispering" a popular horse training method developed by Monty Roberts, the first Horse Whisperer.
The concept is the same. The idea is to communicate with the animal in its own language instead of ours.

Thank you for verifying that I was on the right track in an earlier post.

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
01-01-2015, 06:47 PM
Re: Dog whispering woo-hoo
A lot of animal behavior is fairly obvious. For instance, dogs act like wolves, so treat them as such. Alpha (us) never runs after a lower rank, so don't run after your dog. That's how I get my dog back in; I stand there and give a short loud "Hey!" and point. Don't tell at a barking dog because he hears it as you barking so he gets louder. Dogs feel safe and happy with a pack, so let them know who's boss. Et cetera.

Cat behavior: They shove their butts in your face because mother cat checks for clean booty. They rub you to mark you with their scent, including under the chin (which is probably why petting them there feels good).

Bearded dragon? Don't nod your head because that is usually questioning their authority.

Just read a bit and watch a nature show, and the mystique of "whispering" goes away fast.

Smile
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-01-2015, 05:07 AM
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
(01-01-2015 06:38 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(01-01-2015 06:20 PM)Dom Wrote:  The dog with the toys learned them one by one, noting differences along the way, with lots of repetition and you can tell he was taught with ample praise at every turn. It doesn't say how long it took, but the initial retrieving of the first toy was surely repeated many times, then the second, then the third, until each became a part of permanent memory because of the repetition. So they taught the dog to think like a human, by integrating lots of things permanently in memory. We then call that intelligent - it is not, it is rote learning. Finding the one object he had never seen or heard of before - that was intelligence.

Drawing from memory is not how dogs normally think, they have each situation as an all new picture, not recalling what happened two minutes ago but drawing more info than we can imagine from the present.

I also think the age old "wisdom" that first the dog needs to know you are the boss isn't exactly right. First the dog needs to know that your input is more important than any other input at all times. There is a difference!!!

Imagine having no short term memory and huge amounts of constant sensory input. We would not know what to pay attention to. A lot of dogs don't know either. They can only do linear logic because they have no short term memory. If dog and person pay attention to each other (has to go both ways) they can do all sorts of things. But - almost all the time it's the dog committing certain behaviors to permanent memory through repetition.

That is how the dog can learn from us. But - it doesn't help us at all to learn from the dog. I would give my right arm to be able to get into a dogs head and perceive everything they do.

A new toy (Einstein doll) was added to a group of a dozen or two that she knew.
She was told to go get "Einstein". She successfully retrieved it.

Yes, I know, I pointed out that this was the "intelligent" part.

[Image: dobie.png]Science is the process we've designed to be responsible for generating our best guess as to what the fuck is going on. Girly Man
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-01-2015, 09:45 AM
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
Does anyone remember Barbara Woodhouse? I just loved her, she was so quirky, practical and, well.....so British!

Walkies!!!!




Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes dancefortwo's post
02-01-2015, 09:44 PM
RE: Dog whispering woo-hoo
(01-01-2015 01:35 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  
(01-01-2015 12:23 PM)Chas Wrote:  Don't tell this gal that. No




I've see this dog before. It's amazing. I know some people who aren't as smart as this dog.

Yep. The republicunts have a majority in Congress because of them.

Atheism is NOT a Religion. It's A Personal Relationship With Reality!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: