ESA Finds Amino Acids on Comet
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
29-05-2016, 11:47 PM
RE: ESA Finds Amino Acids on Comet
(29-05-2016 11:19 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  
(29-05-2016 11:06 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  In a good way or a bad way?

In a bad way. Tardigrades come from a relatively "advanced" phylum, in that the first 3/4ths of the history of life on earth was dominated by single-celled organisms, and then colonial mats, and then blobby things... the Tardigrades did not appear on earth until the Cambrian roughly 530 MYA, though we think we've pinpointed their pre-Cambrian ancestors, Opabinia.

The point is that finding them in comets (supposedly extant from the formation of our solar system) would mean the prebiotic materials got there along with the animals that flew up there, somehow, and would essentially reset our research to Square One.

I want to be a water bear.

There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like GirlyMan's post
29-05-2016, 11:48 PM
RE: ESA Finds Amino Acids on Comet
(29-05-2016 11:19 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  
(29-05-2016 11:06 PM)GirlyMan Wrote:  In a good way or a bad way?

In a bad way. Tardigrades come from a relatively "advanced" phylum, in that the first 3/4ths of the history of life on earth was dominated by single-celled organisms, and then colonial mats, and then blobby things... the Tardigrades did not appear on earth until the Cambrian roughly 530 MYA, though we think we've pinpointed their pre-Cambrian ancestors, Opabinia.

The point is that finding them in comets (supposedly extant from the formation of our solar system) would mean the prebiotic materials got there along with the animals that flew up there, somehow, and would essentially reset our research to Square One.


Sounds like a good way to me.




There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
30-05-2016, 12:04 AM
RE: ESA Finds Amino Acids on Comet
Since Comets contain such complex molecules as this, god musta have designed comets.
q.e.d.
Clap

Ceterum censeo, religionem delendam esse
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
30-05-2016, 07:15 AM
RE: ESA Finds Amino Acids on Comet
Intersting. Especially in light of this recent work on helical structures.

http://www.thethinkingatheist.com/forum/...of-DNA-RNA

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes The Organic Chemist's post
30-05-2016, 07:53 AM
RE: ESA Finds Amino Acids on Comet
Tardigrades are indeed one of my favorite creatures on earth, especially given their amazing ability to survive.

That said, we'd expect them to be found on bits of rock, perhaps, that were blown off the earth by extremely powerful meteorite impacts (such as the K-T boundary one), but not on comets that supposedly formed when the solar system did.

We're looking for what fell to earth and seeded life's constituent molecules into our early, just-forming oceans (whose water was also likely dropped here by cometary impacts), in order to kick-start abiogenesis chemistry... not for bits of earth that somehow made it back up into space after 4 billion years of earth's existence.

If we found tardigrades on comets, it would shred everything we think we know about the formation of the solar system.

"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
30-05-2016, 02:26 PM
RE: ESA Finds Amino Acids on Comet
(30-05-2016 07:53 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  Tardigrades are indeed one of my favorite creatures on earth, especially given their amazing ability to survive.

That said, we'd expect them to be found on bits of rock, perhaps, that were blown off the earth by extremely powerful meteorite impacts (such as the K-T boundary one), but not on comets that supposedly formed when the solar system did.

We're looking for what fell to earth and seeded life's constituent molecules into our early, just-forming oceans (whose water was also likely dropped here by cometary impacts), in order to kick-start abiogenesis chemistry... not for bits of earth that somehow made it back up into space after 4 billion years of earth's existence.

If we found tardigrades on comets, it would shred everything we think we know about the formation of the solar system.

Tardigrade don't give a shit. Laugh out load

There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide. -Camus
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: