Early Attempts at Human Flight
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22-10-2013, 10:01 AM (This post was last modified: 22-10-2013 12:27 PM by Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver.)
Early Attempts at Human Flight
I have heard various stories about this throughout human history concerning the Chinese and the construction of Kites and primitive gliders, but there seems to be some sound historical evidence behind this.

However the credit for the first fully controllable heavier-than-air aircraft still goes to Orville and Wilbur Wright, though their true contribution was the development of a sound and repeatable science of basic aerodynamics developed through wind tunnel testing.

http://www.brighthub.com/science/aviatio.../9045.aspx

The Chinese Hot Air Baloon

Because we, humans, cannot fly using our own power, we have been attracted towards the idea of flight for some two millenniums. Even though the first human flight using a machine heavier than air did not occur until a century ago, there have been other attempts to fly, using kites or gliding flight as early as the 6th century CE.

The first records of flight come from ancient China.

To scare enemy troops, general Zhuge Liang (180-234 AD) installed an oil lamp under a large paper bag, and the bag floated because the lamp was heating the air. It was a primitive version of a hot air balloon, and it was used to frighten enemy troops because they thought a divine force was helping the Chinese.

This device became popular in festivals and spread along the Silk Route into Central Asia and the Middle East. A similar floating light are common in Tibetan and Indian celebrations. However there are no records to show that they were used for human flight.

According to the Comprehensive Mirror for the Aid of Government, the first human to fly was Yuan Huangtou, in 559. Huangtou, son of the erstwhile emperor of the Notrthern Wei kingdom, launched himself on a kite from a tower in the capital Ye during a succession wrangle. Records mark that he floated across the city walls and survived the landing only to be executed shortly after.

Early Gliders and Parachute
The next records of attempted flights come from the Islamic Spain during the Umayyad renaissance. In 852, Arab polymath and inventor Abbas Ibn Firmas made a set of wings with cloth stiffened by wooden struts. His device was similar toan umbrella and did no fly, but slowed his landing. This invention is now considered a prototype for the modern parachute.

In 877, the same Ibn Firnas is said to have flown using a rudimentary glider. Frinas crashed and sustained injury. Some critics attribute this accident to a lack of a tail. But his flight may have served as an inspiration for Eilmer of Malmesbury who flew for some 200 meters using a similar glider in 1010.

Da Vinci and The Celebi Brothers
Italian polymath Leonardo da Vinci designed a glider prototype that had the inner parts fixed but some control surfaces were designed towards the tips (in an effort to imitate the flight of a bird). He never flew his prototype, and there is controversy whether he could of made it fly. Based on drawings and using materials that would have been available to him, a machine constructed in the late 20th century was shown to fly. But his designs have been interpreted using modern knowledge of aerodynamic prinicples. It is discussed if his ideas could of made the machine fly. He built a model in 1496, but it did not fly and several other designs are proven to have severe flaws. This does not make da Vinci a lesser scientist and visionary than he was.

It is reported that in 1630-1632, the Ottoman Turkish polymath Hezarfen Ahmet Celebi launched from the top of the Galata Tower in Instanbul and flew for about 3 km, landing uninjured. In 1633, Hezarfen's brother, Lagari Hasan Celebi used gunpowder to launch himself in the air. The flight was estimated to have lasted about 20 seconds and Lagari reached the maximum height of 300 meters.

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22-10-2013, 10:34 AM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
Cool , Id never heard of early successful gliders before wright bros engine-less experiments.
Thought the french were the first up in hot air balloons.

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22-10-2013, 10:48 AM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
(22-10-2013 10:01 AM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  I have heard various stories about this throughout human history concerning the Chinese and the construction of Kites and primitive gliders, but there seems to be some sound historical evidence behind this.

However the credit for the first fully controllable heavier-than-air aircraft still goes to Orville and Wilbur Wright, though their true contribution was the development of a sound and repeatible science of basic aerodynamics developed through wind tunnel testing.

http://www.brighthub.com/science/aviatio.../9045.aspx

The Chinese Hot Air Baloon

Because we, humans, cannot fly using our own power, we have been attracted towards the idea of flight for some two millenniums. Even though the first human flight using a machine heavier than air did not occur until a century ago, there have been other attempts to fly, using kites or gliding flight as early as the 6th century CE.

The first records of flight come from ancient China.

To scare enemy troops, general Zhuge Liang (180-234 AD) installed an oil lamp under a large paper bag, and the bag floated because the lamp was heating the air. It was a primitive version of a hot air balloon, and it was used to frighten enemy troops because they thought a divine force was helping the Chinese.

This device became popular in festivals and spread along the Silk Route into Central Asia and the Middle East. A similar floating light are common in Tibetan and Indian celebrations. However there are no records to show that they were used for human flight.

According to the Comprehensive Mirror for the Aid of Government, the first human to fly was Yuan Huangtou, in 559. Huangtou, son of the erstwhile emperor of the Notrthern Wei kingdom, launched himself on a kite from a tower in the capital Ye during a succession wrangle. Records mark that he floated across the city walls and survived the landing only to be executed shortly after.

Early Gliders and Parachute
The next records of attempted flights come from the Islamic Spain during the Umayyad renaissance. In 852, Arab polymath and inventor Abbas Ibn Firmas made a set of wings with cloth stiffened by wooden struts. His device was similar toan umbrella and did no fly, but slowed his landing. This invention is now considered a prototype for the modern parachute.

In 877, the same Ibn Firnas is said to have flown using a rudimentary glider. Frinas crashed and sustained injury. Some critics attribute this accident to a lack of a tail. But his flight may have served as an inspiration for Eilmer of Malmesbury who flew for some 200 meters using a similar glider in 1010.

Da Vinci and The Celebi Brothers
Italian polymath Leonardo da Vinci designed a glider prototype that had the inner parts fixed but some control surfaces were designed towards the tips (in an effort to imitate the flight of a bird). He never flew his prototype, and there is controversy whether he could of made it fly. Based on drawings and using materials that would have been available to him, a machine constructed in the late 20th century was shown to fly. But his designs have been interpreted using modern knowledge of aerodynamic prinicples. It is discussed if his ideas could of made the machine fly. He built a model in 1496, but it did not fly and several other designs are proven to have severe flaws. This does not make da Vinci a lesser scientist and visionary than he was.

It is reported that in 1630-1632, the Ottoman Turkish polymath Hezarfen Ahmet Celebi launched from the top of the Galata Tower in Instanbul and flew for about 3 km, landing uninjured. In 1633, Hezarfen's brother, Lagari Hasan Celebi used gunpowder to launch himself in the air. The flight was estimated to have lasted about 20 seconds and Lagari reached the maximum height of 300 meters.

Did you mean to put this in the Science section? Cause I don't see how this is conspiracy theory or pseudoscience. Very interesting topic though.

(31-07-2014 04:37 PM)Luminon Wrote:  America is full of guns, but they're useless, because nobody has the courage to shoot an IRS agent in self-defense
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22-10-2013, 10:52 AM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
(22-10-2013 10:48 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  Did you mean to put this in the Science section? Cause I don't see how this is conspiracy theory or pseudoscience. Very interesting topic though.

I guess if people think the moon landings were a conspiracy then you may as well throw in human flight.

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22-10-2013, 12:26 PM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
(22-10-2013 10:48 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(22-10-2013 10:01 AM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  I have heard various stories about this throughout human history concerning the Chinese and the construction of Kites and primitive gliders, but there seems to be some sound historical evidence behind this.

However the credit for the first fully controllable heavier-than-air aircraft still goes to Orville and Wilbur Wright, though their true contribution was the development of a sound and repeatible science of basic aerodynamics developed through wind tunnel testing.

http://www.brighthub.com/science/aviatio.../9045.aspx

The Chinese Hot Air Baloon

Because we, humans, cannot fly using our own power, we have been attracted towards the idea of flight for some two millenniums. Even though the first human flight using a machine heavier than air did not occur until a century ago, there have been other attempts to fly, using kites or gliding flight as early as the 6th century CE.

The first records of flight come from ancient China.

To scare enemy troops, general Zhuge Liang (180-234 AD) installed an oil lamp under a large paper bag, and the bag floated because the lamp was heating the air. It was a primitive version of a hot air balloon, and it was used to frighten enemy troops because they thought a divine force was helping the Chinese.

This device became popular in festivals and spread along the Silk Route into Central Asia and the Middle East. A similar floating light are common in Tibetan and Indian celebrations. However there are no records to show that they were used for human flight.

According to the Comprehensive Mirror for the Aid of Government, the first human to fly was Yuan Huangtou, in 559. Huangtou, son of the erstwhile emperor of the Notrthern Wei kingdom, launched himself on a kite from a tower in the capital Ye during a succession wrangle. Records mark that he floated across the city walls and survived the landing only to be executed shortly after.

Early Gliders and Parachute
The next records of attempted flights come from the Islamic Spain during the Umayyad renaissance. In 852, Arab polymath and inventor Abbas Ibn Firmas made a set of wings with cloth stiffened by wooden struts. His device was similar toan umbrella and did no fly, but slowed his landing. This invention is now considered a prototype for the modern parachute.

In 877, the same Ibn Firnas is said to have flown using a rudimentary glider. Frinas crashed and sustained injury. Some critics attribute this accident to a lack of a tail. But his flight may have served as an inspiration for Eilmer of Malmesbury who flew for some 200 meters using a similar glider in 1010.

Da Vinci and The Celebi Brothers
Italian polymath Leonardo da Vinci designed a glider prototype that had the inner parts fixed but some control surfaces were designed towards the tips (in an effort to imitate the flight of a bird). He never flew his prototype, and there is controversy whether he could of made it fly. Based on drawings and using materials that would have been available to him, a machine constructed in the late 20th century was shown to fly. But his designs have been interpreted using modern knowledge of aerodynamic prinicples. It is discussed if his ideas could of made the machine fly. He built a model in 1496, but it did not fly and several other designs are proven to have severe flaws. This does not make da Vinci a lesser scientist and visionary than he was.

It is reported that in 1630-1632, the Ottoman Turkish polymath Hezarfen Ahmet Celebi launched from the top of the Galata Tower in Instanbul and flew for about 3 km, landing uninjured. In 1633, Hezarfen's brother, Lagari Hasan Celebi used gunpowder to launch himself in the air. The flight was estimated to have lasted about 20 seconds and Lagari reached the maximum height of 300 meters.

Did you mean to put this in the Science section? Cause I don't see how this is conspiracy theory or pseudoscience. Very interesting topic though.

I guess it fits there just as well.

"IN THRUST WE TRUST"

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22-10-2013, 11:01 PM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
One of my very early attempts landed me in sagebrush, pinned against my harness. It was... eh... embarrassing.

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23-10-2013, 01:48 AM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
(22-10-2013 11:01 PM)Logisch Wrote:  One of my very early attempts landed me in sagebrush, pinned against my harness. It was... eh... embarrassing.

Heh you and every other kid. At least you didn't break a limb (unlike a friend of mine)

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23-10-2013, 02:12 AM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
My first flight was a $20 foil.

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23-10-2013, 03:33 AM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
Although there is no direct evidence, models of what is believed to be gliders were found in ancient Egyptian tombs. It could be that there were just toys though. Whatever the case it appears that the Egyptians at least had some fundamental knowledge about aerodynamics. Just throwing that out there.

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23-10-2013, 03:38 AM
RE: Early Attempts at Human Flight
(23-10-2013 01:48 AM)Revenant77x Wrote:  
(22-10-2013 11:01 PM)Logisch Wrote:  One of my very early attempts landed me in sagebrush, pinned against my harness. It was... eh... embarrassing.

Heh you and every other kid. At least you didn't break a limb (unlike a friend of mine)

When I was about 12 I went on a school trip up in the mountains....okay, I live in the mountains, but this was further up the mountains at a place called Tremont. On a particularly steep part...maybe 75 degrees or so there were some grapevines. Naturally, I decided it would be fun to swing out over the mountains. At the furthest point out I was probably over a hundred feet from ground level. I did this many times. One time I swung back in only to hit a tree. I rolled down the mountain pretty impressively, but nothing more than a bruise. Big Grin

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