Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
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27-02-2012, 12:41 AM
Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
So I'm noticing more and more a disturbing trend. Children as young as 4 have their own personal Iphone or Ipad. They are babysat at home with HD tvs and kept quiet in public with more electronics. You gotta wonder if this lack of boredom will affect this generation in a negative way. No time to use their imagination or be bored, thinking about random things. I feel like this "instant gratification" style of life will cause children to have shorter attention spans and make then anger easier. At holidays now, my younger relatives will pull out their phones and surf youtube rather than interact with the family.

And how likely will a child be to cling to moral teachings if they come from Dora and Little Bear rather than parents they will want to respect. Little Bear won't be offended if you ignore his advice. While I don't know if any of this is supported by science (I think this might be the experimental group to yield the first results), I'm still concerned for the implications of a digital childhood.

And with newer technologies, it's only gonna get worse.

"Ain't got no last words to say, yellow streak right up my spine. The gun in my mouth was real and the taste blew my mind."

"We see you cry. We turn your head. Then we slap your face. We see you try. We see you fail. Some things never change."
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27-02-2012, 12:58 AM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
I spent more time with TV and super nintendo than I did with mom and dad. I'm rather sociable nowadays, I don't have anger issues much as long as my testosterone is kept in check, and I'm pretty good about letting things happen.

One of my interesting strengths is that it's really hard for me to be bored. As long as I'm not unhappy I can do menial tasks for hours because I grew up keeping myself entertained.

I did not have internet, so most likely the newer electric kids understand social cues better than I do. I never really learned all the local customs and such. My way of speech came more from television than my relatives.

One of the biggest things different about me than most people though, I really don't have a high value for family (maybe cause they weren't that good =p) I've never met anyone as unconcerned with their family as I am (who still has one).

Unfortunately I'm probably a bad subject due to my intersexuality and the fact that I was molested at 5 years old.

I'm not a non believer, I believe in the possibility of anything. I just don't let the actuality of something be determined by a 3rd party.
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27-02-2012, 01:37 PM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
It's hard to tell, every person is a cosmos, and psychology and neuroscience are still in diapers so they can't give us a complete answer, my best guess is that it depends on how parents and other social groups interact with the child, if parents promote a critic mind and a responsible use of the technology gadgets then the kid would be just fine, maybe the intimate relation with the technology can even be good for him/her as technology could bring her/him closer to scientific thinking and social interactions (through FB or other social networks). On the other hand, if badly used, then the kid probably can be very harmed for the lack of human interaction and other stuff you mentioned.

As always, technology is not bad or good in itself, it depends on the use and the environment in which it's used Big Grin

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27-02-2012, 01:54 PM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
I wonder the same things, but if I can attest for one thing in life, it's balance and moderation.

Healthy limits are good things. And the skill of sitting quietly and being patient are excellent things.
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27-02-2012, 01:56 PM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
The attention-span is going to be a problem later in life. Since the early 60's, when psychological studies were made on children - some for the purpose of improving education, more for optimizing marketing vehicles, such as children's television programs. Once attention-spans for different age-groups were measured, the entertainment and advertising industries designed their product for each age-group, based on those figures. The objective was to leave no room for boredom - not to lose the target audience. To be on the safe side, or to be more exciting than the competitor, they paced the shows that just little faster, doled out information or narrative in just a little bit smaller packets... each season. Result: in 15 years, the average attention-span of preschoolers was reduced from 3 minutes to about 30 seconds.
Those children, as adults now, are compulsive channel-surfers and media-junkies who can't bear silence and can't read a paragraph as long as this one without a vertigo attack. It makes post-secondary education a huge challenge.... often requiring ritalin to negotiate successfully. ADHD is not an entirely natural disorder.

If you pray to anything, you're prey to anything.
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27-02-2012, 05:50 PM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
I don't necessarily think it's technology raising kids that's fucking them up, I mean I've seen parents who do a much worse job. I think it's the constant availability of it. No matter where a kid goes the internet is available. Videogames and TV are there. No need to use brain power. No need to spell properly when texting is your most common way of communication.

I hate cell phones. They are the bane of my existence. Have been since the days of Zach Morris.

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"I think of myself as an intelligent, sensitive human being with the soul of a clown which always forces me to blow it at the most important moments." -Jim Morrison
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28-02-2012, 03:16 PM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
I have an 8 year old boy and a 9 year old girl. The girl loves TV, plays her Ipod touch a bit, and will play a game on the Wii but isn't heartbroken if she doesn't.

My boy is a different story. My wife & I are in a constant struggle to limit his "screen" time. Whether it is Wii, PS3 (that's mine the kids have the Wii), ipods, wife's iphone, computer, etc he could stare at a screen all day. He prefers the interactive vs the passive TV. We simply limit the time he can look at a screen no matter what the format. We control his ipod touch. It is tough and believe me that sometimes it would be great to just let him at it but it isn't right.
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28-02-2012, 03:32 PM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
Your concerns are valid BC. This is why.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ADHD

“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it's time to pause and reflect.”

-Mark Twain
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28-02-2012, 04:10 PM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
(28-02-2012 03:16 PM)devilsadvoc8 Wrote:  I have an 8 year old boy and a 9 year old girl. The girl loves TV, plays her Ipod touch a bit, and will play a game on the Wii but isn't heartbroken if she doesn't.

My boy is a different story. My wife & I are in a constant struggle to limit his "screen" time. Whether it is Wii, PS3 (that's mine the kids have the Wii), ipods, wife's iphone, computer, etc he could stare at a screen all day. He prefers the interactive vs the passive TV. We simply limit the time he can look at a screen no matter what the format. We control his ipod touch. It is tough and believe me that sometimes it would be great to just let him at it but it isn't right.

does he tells you about what he plays? I ask because I used to be very dependant of screens when I was a kid and my mom took a similar approach and failed Tongue
Then she changed her strategy, and started to ask me about what was I playing, she was actually really interested (I was playing Diablo at that time, a great pc game), she started asking me because of the name of the game (it means devil in spanish), a few months passed by and I failed to win the game, but she still asked me about it, did I find that special bow or did I defeated that boss, etc. that, added to the fact that she encouraged me to get more "educational" games (not that crap some people think are games, things like sim city or creatures or crazy machines, look them up, those are awesome) made me realize I could use my interest for gaming and technology in general without giving up real life.
Five years later I finally beat Diablo, and I randomly commented it to my mom "hey! I won a game I was playing", she asked "you killed Diablo?" I was in shock, she remembered and actually came to my room and forced me to show her how I killed it, and she then asked me to translate the final video scene because she wanted to know how the story ended (it's a very rich game in terms of storyline), again, I was surprised she knew so much about the game, I never realized how much we talked about it, it was awesome!
Now I'm going to law school, and work in an NGO specialized in cyber law, and I want to make my specialization around it. I use to tell my mom: "see, you didn't want me to spend all that time in the computer, but now I got huge work opportunities thanks to what I learned for doing that and disobeying you" and she replies to me, "yes, that awesome, but I was also there by your side, even if you didn't noticed" besides the creepiness (she loves to play mindfucking games) I have to thank her about it, because she didn't pulled me away from what I loved, she encouraged me to make the most out of it, even though she thought it wasn't the most healthy thing for me to do.

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28-02-2012, 05:38 PM
RE: Electronic parenting and the consequences of modern child raising
Screen time here is limited too, but only if I notice it's being abused. When my kids need to research something on the internet, I usually do it with them. It makes "screen time" into something that involves human interaction. We have a blast surfing together. It can get really funny when three people are surfing on one computer!

The reason I don't have defined limits is that I give them other things to do. Often things that are doled out as "chores" end up being something they like. I use the "chores" excuse just so that I can point them in the right direction ("hey girls, I need you to walk to the back of the property and make sure the trail is clear", or "hey since we are having a bonfire this weekend, I need you to go pull some deadfall from the bush", or even, "Mr. so-and-so is not feeling well, please go and shovel his walk/rake his leaves/whatever." They end up going on an adventure in the bush, or visiting with a friendly neighbor. At the same time, it gives them a sense of freedom, since I am telling them chores to do, and not dictating what they do in their free time. And if, during their free time, they spend too much of it in front of a screen, I gently direct them outside because the dogs need a walk (something they love to do, but don't admit it because they think they're foolin the old man into giving them chores they like.......

OK. Hang on here. While I was typing, my 15 year old daughter walked in the room. So I asked her what she thought. We just talked about it for a half hour, and I asked her if she'd quickly type a few of her thoughts on the subject for you all to read. So here's what she has to say..

Quote:The internet is a huge network of basically anything. You can search up anything you want and "BAM!", there it is. Lots of people say it is great. They say things like, "You can find whatever you want! All the information you need is right there, on a small screen!" And others say that it is "poisoning the minds of our children". Now, I can't really say whether I think it is good or bad. I will admit, I love it! I can facebook my friends, I can google any research topic my teacher asks, and I can play an unlimited amount of games. But the thing is, it is so unlimited that kids can find whatever they want. Kids who are nine, ten, or even younger, have such a wide range of choices of topics, but they can even find things that their parents would faint at. Because innapropriate sites aren't blocked. The computer can't see that you are young. It only rely's on the fact that you click a button saying you are over eighteen. So although the internet is great, it has some... not so great features.
I'll touch on texting quickly. Now, I love my phone. But I understand why parents, for example, get mad when I am always on it. I recently got my phone taken away, for two weeks. And I am stuck having conversations with my friends while they are using their phones. I get that they have other people to talk to, and I know that they don't mean to put me down. When I had my phone, I never wanted to hurt other peoples feeling when they were right in front of me. But it still makes you feel low priority sometimes. So when your face is glued to the screen, it makes it seem like you aren't as important.

She also brought up several other points that I was impressed with. She talked about how writing is a lost art, along with penmanship and spelling. I asked her the difference and she said that writing is akin to story telling. Since she so often communicates with single words and sentences (ie texting and facebook) she and her peers don't communicate as well as earlier generations. (Smart kid huh?)

Dammit, my own kid hijacked my post IN my post!!! LOL

She makes me proud.

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