English Spelling Reform
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
12-02-2016, 06:24 AM
RE: English Spelling Reform
It is interesting that the river Thames is pronounced Tems. Smile

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
12-02-2016, 06:29 AM
RE: English Spelling Reform
Isn't the English language fun?? Especially so, when non-English people speak it.

I howled with laughter when I heard that the Bush administration decided that "Waterboarding isn't torture - it's "enhanced interrogation" " .....

WOW...

Only in America....

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes onlinebiker's post
12-02-2016, 07:50 AM
RE: English Spelling Reform
(12-02-2016 06:29 AM)onlinebiker Wrote:  Isn't the English language fun?? Especially so, when non-English people speak it.

I howled with laughter when I heard that the Bush administration decided that "Waterboarding isn't torture - it's "enhanced interrogation" " .....

WOW...

Only in America....

I prefer the term baptizing terrorists in freedom.

'Murican Canadian
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like yakherder's post
12-02-2016, 09:52 AM
RE: English Spelling Reform
(11-02-2016 09:40 PM)Glossophile Wrote:  If your ultimate goal in making this argument is to support the orthographic status quo in its entirety, as I suspect it is, then your challenge seems even greater. Not only must your criteria be objective and synchronically linguistic, but the lines that they draw must happen to precisely match current rules.

Unless you can do this, then the Homophone Argument is just special pleading.

You misunderstand her point. Leaving aside that your proposal is utterly unworkable, numerous people have pointed out to you that the are both pros and cons to it, and you seem to refuse to admit the cons while overselling the pros.

No one is advocating for present conventions as if they were ex nihilo proscriptive systems - what you're calling special pleading here is a ridiculous straw man.

(11-02-2016 09:40 PM)Glossophile Wrote:  Sorry, but I still don't understand this sentiment. Speech does not distinguish between homophones, but spelling does. Does that mean that a written text becomes linguistically simpler as soon as it is read aloud? If the spoken form can convey adequate meaning, even in the case of lofty and/or complicated concepts, why wouldn't an orthography that reliably encodes those spoken form be any less clear? If one can recognize the word "filosøfi" or "dimokrøsi," why would those particular spellings make the ideas that they represent any harder to discuss? Any word that we can say, we can spell phonemically (e.g. Søkrætik, Pleitønizøm, ripablik, ilekçøn).

Speech contains numerous cues that are absent in writing. Written language makes up for that by conveying information in different ways. An obsession with strict phonetic transcription is missing the point of writing systems entirely.

... this is my signature!
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like cjlr's post
12-02-2016, 12:21 PM
RE: English Spelling Reform
Reading through this thread I haven't seen any valid objections. Not from my point of view anyway.

Language and written language is a means to communicate. The author is expressing their own ideas, they have no interest in the history (tradition) of the underlying words. The words themselves are unimportant, they are merely a tool. The message that the author is conveying is the only thing that is important.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Stevil's post
12-02-2016, 12:25 PM
RE: English Spelling Reform
(12-02-2016 06:24 AM)Banjo Wrote:  It is interesting that the river Thames is pronounced Tems. Smile
When I write "minute" am I talking about the passage of time or something that is physically small? these two words are pronounced differently but have the same spelling. Go figure?
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
12-02-2016, 12:41 PM
RE: English Spelling Reform
(12-02-2016 12:21 PM)Stevil Wrote:  Reading through this thread I haven't seen any valid objections. Not from my point of view anyway.

Language and written language is a means to communicate. The author is expressing their own ideas, they have no interest in the history (tradition) of the underlying words. The words themselves are unimportant, they are merely a tool. The message that the author is conveying is the only thing that is important.

This is far from true in a lot of writing. It depends on the expression and context of the writing medium. There is a lot of what would be interest to the history and meaning of traditional context in words in literary or academic writing that can even translate to communicative debate. Even to a place like that. Allusions, references, puns, and other wordplay inferences are built on that point.

In a lot more direct communication, there isn't that care, but that isn't all you seek in the total form of writing potential.

"Allow there to be a spectrum in all that you see" - Neil Degrasse Tyson
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes ClydeLee's post
12-02-2016, 12:47 PM
RE: English Spelling Reform
(12-02-2016 12:41 PM)ClydeLee Wrote:  In a lot more direct communication, there isn't that care, but that isn't all you seek in the total form of writing potential.
It's all I am interested in.

I understand that others have a different perspective. Perhaps they are resistant to change, perhaps they have a love of literacy and the history of words, perhaps they love their ability to use puns etc and may feel that they might be lost if the words are changed. A poet or a literary author may not like this change.

But I am speaking from the "I"
I have no interest in these things. My only interest in words is a means to communicate ideas effectively. One of the big reasons I don't like moral language, because it is extremely ambiguous and hides/blurs the real underlying ideas of the person using it.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
12-02-2016, 01:19 PM
RE: English Spelling Reform
(12-02-2016 12:21 PM)Stevil Wrote:  Reading through this thread I haven't seen any valid objections. Not from my point of view anyway.

Language and written language is a means to communicate. The author is expressing their own ideas, they have no interest in the history (tradition) of the underlying words. The words themselves are unimportant, they are merely a tool. The message that the author is conveying is the only thing that is important.

Part of that communication is the words themselves including their form.

The OP has no compelling argument for benefit versus the massive upheaval.

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
[Image: flagstiny%206.gif]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
12-02-2016, 01:41 PM
RE: English Spelling Reform
(11-02-2016 08:31 AM)yakherder Wrote:  Pretty soon we're gonna have spell check capable devices implanted directly into our brains anyway.

I would look forward to that. My spelling is horrible. It makes sense in my head but when I type it out so many words are underlined in red. Grrrr. Texting and tweeting has changed spelling or at least shortened words. My husband teaches Shakespeare and he has the kids write Shakespeare out in text language. It's kinda fun. I now see proper nouns not being capitalized by younger people as much, it takes too much time and effort on an iphone. I don't capitalize the word god on purpose. Mostly just to rile theists up. (snicker, snicker)

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: