Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
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14-09-2017, 12:18 PM
Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
Okay the title is a bit of a mess i couldn´t really figur out how to properly frase the question.

The way i understand it the best way to create gravity in space is through rotation.
So if it´s on a spaceship it might be by creating several sections and rooms in a large cylinder and have it rotate.

Now there would probably be several sections where gravity wasn´t needed, maybe in the engine room or in long service corridors.

My question would be how would re-enter the cylinder as i could imagine the door to the room would be spinning as well.
Would you just have to have to have some handles on the side of the door you would grip before entering or how?

Also lets say you make an engine or maybe use some form of solar sails that would allow us to reach the nearest solar system in a couple of years at the most.
At that speed, the inertia would push us towards what ever direction you where moving away from and as such create gravity.

Now that´s all well and good but we would eventually have to slow down as we reach our destination and once bellow a certain speed, we will no longer have gravity from speed.

Now unless we want to split our ship into interchangeable sections one where the crew is at during flight and one with a cylinder that rotates.
We would probably have to have the crew be in the cylinder all the time.

The question is then when the cylinder rotates it pulls the crew in one direction and when in flight the crew might be pulled in another direction.
So how could the two for lack of a better word be unified?
How do you make sure that no matter if in flight or with rotation up and down will always be in the same direction.
I could imagine you might have to flip the rooms inside the cylinder or something like that so it always matches which way gravity now pulls at you, but i am not sure.

So how exactly would could such a problem be overcome?
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14-09-2017, 12:29 PM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
Read "Rendezvous with Rama" by Arthur C Clark.


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14-09-2017, 12:44 PM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
Enter at the axis.
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14-09-2017, 01:15 PM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?








For your second scenario you'd only get the effect if the ship were constantly accelerating so if the bulk of the journey is at a constant velocity the problem isn't there. For the periods where velocity is changing why not have the quarters rotate?

Personally, I'll wait for them to invent grav plating.

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14-09-2017, 01:18 PM
Photo RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(14-09-2017 12:44 PM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  Enter at the axis.

Maybe it´s just me who doesn´t understand it or maybe i just have the wrong picture in my head.
Because when i imagine a corridor i imagine it a little like this
[Image: Enders-Game-Still-June-4-2013.jpg]

With the circle rotating and the corridor itself being separate from the rotating cylinder.

So would you have to come in at an angle or something like that and perhaps grab the handles on the side and turn yourself facing the right way to the door before going inside or how exactly?
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14-09-2017, 01:43 PM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
Well, you can enter a rotating cylinder like that and grab on. It's not going nearly as fast as the outside. Put a bar across the cylinder and you can grab that at nearly zero rotation, then slide down to the wall and let yourself down on a ladder.
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14-09-2017, 04:42 PM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
A spinning space craft could produce an artificial apparent weight —but not "artificial gravity". Astronauts in orbit feel weightless because there isn’t a contact force pushing on them, but there is still a minuscule gravitational force. What you feel when you're standing on the Earth is actually the force of the ground pushing on you and not the Earth's gravitational force as such. In order to feel weight, you don’t even need a gravitational force. All you need is a force from the ground (or floor) pushing on you—which is why you momentarily feel heavier in an elevator.

In "2001: A Space Odyssey", there was a large centrifuge inside the crew compartment that spun (which differed from Clarke's original story, in which the entire craft was spinning) so that it produced an Earth-like apparent weight.

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14-09-2017, 05:56 PM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
So... people have already mentioned A.C.Clarke's 2001. There is also the ship form 2010.

Also, think of the whole vessel spinning as it slides majestically through space.

The ship from "The Martian' had a large spinning section that the ship carried at its 'waist'.

Pretty much as people have tried to describe. You can enter through the central axis of spin or, (Bear with my limited word skills)

Say you had a large spinning section and, for what ever reason, the ends/axle points coupld not simply have a entry-egress space included. What you could do is attatch a couple of small boxes to the edge/rim. They can eaither sit 'motionless and in place in regards to the entire ship and then, once some one wants to gain entry to the rotational section, 'acccelerate' along the edge untill they are at the same rotational speed as the rotating section. Now they are 'motioinless' in relation to the rotationg secion (Moving at its same speed) but twirling along in relation to the ship as a whole.

Another thing that people may not have pointed out is that centripedal forces are not... uniform. So... for 'comfortalble' feelings a really wide circle/circumfrence as the higher effective 'weight'/'rotation' are requird.

Hope some of those rambling help. Smile
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15-09-2017, 12:57 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
Just to put some misunderstanding(s) right:

Why can we *emulate* gravity with spinning wheels?

You will not be able to physically measure and determine a difference between being accelerated and being in a graviational field. The effects are absolutely identical. In other words: being in a gravitational field (of a heavy body) is equal to being accelerated. Picture yourself being in a closed elecator (cabin). When you try to find out if the cabin is being constantly accelerated with 9.81m/s^2 or standing still on the earth....you will not be able to find out the difference.

Now, *creating* gravity by linear acceleration of 9.81m/s^2 can be troublesome, since you will get faster and faster and eventually reach the speed of light (apart form the fact you need a lot of room/space to do this stunt), but if you are moving in a circle the centrifulgal and centripedal acceleration will provide a nice efficient *emulation* of gravity in a relatively small, confined space (the hamster wheel you are in).

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15-09-2017, 03:14 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
Is gravity caused by "mass" ? or I am being too simple?

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