Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
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15-09-2017, 04:36 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(15-09-2017 03:14 AM)OakTree500 Wrote:  Is gravity caused by "mass" ? or I am being too simple?
Gravity is the expression of the attraction between bodies.
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15-09-2017, 05:25 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(15-09-2017 04:36 AM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  
(15-09-2017 03:14 AM)OakTree500 Wrote:  Is gravity caused by "mass" ? or I am being too simple?
Gravity is the expression of the attraction between bodies.

I thought that was sex

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15-09-2017, 05:43 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(15-09-2017 05:25 AM)unfogged Wrote:  
(15-09-2017 04:36 AM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  Gravity is the expression of the attraction between bodies.

I thought that was sex

I'm 66, my body only attracts flies and pre-paid funeral salesmen.
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15-09-2017, 05:43 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
How do they do it on the Enterprise?
I'd go with that.

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15-09-2017, 06:18 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(15-09-2017 05:43 AM)BikerDude Wrote:  How do they do it on the Enterprise?

Magic.
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15-09-2017, 06:26 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(15-09-2017 05:43 AM)BikerDude Wrote:  How do they do it on the Enterprise?
I'd go with that.

What rotating cylinder did they have on the Enterprise?
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15-09-2017, 06:31 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
Spinning?

Easy.

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15-09-2017, 06:41 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(14-09-2017 12:18 PM)Erikjust Wrote:  Okay the title is a bit of a mess i couldn´t really figur out how to properly frase the question.

The way i understand it the best way to create gravity in space is through rotation.
So if it´s on a spaceship it might be by creating several sections and rooms in a large cylinder and have it rotate.

Now there would probably be several sections where gravity wasn´t needed, maybe in the engine room or in long service corridors.

My question would be how would re-enter the cylinder as i could imagine the door to the room would be spinning as well.
Would you just have to have to have some handles on the side of the door you would grip before entering or how?

Also lets say you make an engine or maybe use some form of solar sails that would allow us to reach the nearest solar system in a couple of years at the most.
At that speed, the inertia would push us towards what ever direction you where moving away from and as such create gravity.

Now that´s all well and good but we would eventually have to slow down as we reach our destination and once bellow a certain speed, we will no longer have gravity from speed.

Now unless we want to split our ship into interchangeable sections one where the crew is at during flight and one with a cylinder that rotates.
We would probably have to have the crew be in the cylinder all the time.

The question is then when the cylinder rotates it pulls the crew in one direction and when in flight the crew might be pulled in another direction.
So how could the two for lack of a better word be unified?
How do you make sure that no matter if in flight or with rotation up and down will always be in the same direction.
I could imagine you might have to flip the rooms inside the cylinder or something like that so it always matches which way gravity now pulls at you, but i am not sure.

So how exactly would could such a problem be overcome?

This is incorrect; a spaceship crew section could rotate in order to create a centripetal force on the crew that SIMULATES Earth normal gravity. Second the nearest star system to our own is 4.6 light years away and solar sails are nowhere near capable of those speeds. Third acceleration to cruise flight and deceleration during arrival would account for only a very small portion of the trip and could be accomplished in a zero G environment with the crew seated and secured using conventional safety restraints.

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15-09-2017, 07:01 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(15-09-2017 06:41 AM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  Third acceleration to cruise flight and deceleration during arrival would account for only a very small portion of the trip and could be accomplished in a zero G environment with the crew seated and secured using conventional safety restraints.
Speed of light, c = 300.000.000 m/s
accel 1g = 10m/s/s

How long to reach c at 1g accel? -> c/1g = 300.000.000 m/s /10 /m *s *s = 300.000.00 s = 500.000min = 8333h = 347d = 1y

You need to accel for 1y constantly at 1g to reach c
(ignoring your increasing mass near c).

If you go for Alpha Centauri (4ly) at 0.1 c. It will take you 40y and you need to accel/decel 0.1y (35days) each, at 1g.

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15-09-2017, 09:15 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(15-09-2017 07:01 AM)Deesse23 Wrote:  
(15-09-2017 06:41 AM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  Third acceleration to cruise flight and deceleration during arrival would account for only a very small portion of the trip and could be accomplished in a zero G environment with the crew seated and secured using conventional safety restraints.
Speed of light, c = 300.000.000 m/s
accel 1g = 10m/s/s

How long to reach c at 1g accel? -> c/1g = 300.000.000 m/s /10 /m *s *s = 300.000.00 s = 500.000min = 8333h = 347d = 1y

You need to accel for 1y constantly at 1g to reach c
(ignoring your increasing mass near c).

If you go for Alpha Centauri (4ly) at 0.1 c. It will take you 40y and you need to accel/decel 0.1y (35days) each, at 1g.

Not if you have dilythium crystals and warp buffering speed brakes.

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