Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
16-09-2017, 10:31 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(16-09-2017 10:19 AM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  
(15-09-2017 07:01 AM)Deesse23 Wrote:  Speed of light, c = 300.000.000 m/s
accel 1g = 10m/s/s

How long to reach c at 1g accel? -> c/1g = 300.000.000 m/s /10 /m *s *s = 300.000.00 s = 500.000min = 8333h = 347d = 1y

You need to accel for 1y constantly at 1g to reach c
(ignoring your increasing mass near c).

If you go for Alpha Centauri (4ly) at 0.1 c. It will take you 40y and you need to accel/decel 0.1y (35days) each, at 1g.

Yeah except for one small detail: WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO FIND A PROPULSION SYSTEM CAPABLE OF BOTH ACCELEREATING TO, AND DECELERATING FROM, THE SPEED OF LIGHT?
E-bay.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Gawdzilla's post
16-09-2017, 10:34 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
(16-09-2017 10:19 AM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  
(15-09-2017 07:01 AM)Deesse23 Wrote:  Speed of light, c = 300.000.000 m/s
accel 1g = 10m/s/s

How long to reach c at 1g accel? -> c/1g = 300.000.000 m/s /10 /m *s *s = 300.000.00 s = 500.000min = 8333h = 347d = 1y

You need to accel for 1y constantly at 1g to reach c
(ignoring your increasing mass near c).

If you go for Alpha Centauri (4ly) at 0.1 c. It will take you 40y and you need to accel/decel 0.1y (35days) each, at 1g.

Yeah except for one small detail: WHERE ARE YOU GOING TO FIND A PROPULSION SYSTEM CAPABLE OF BOTH ACCELEREATING TO, AND DECELERATING FROM, THE SPEED OF LIGHT?

Yep, and an acceleration of 10m/s^2 is pretty massive, considering that the best ion drive we currently have (chemical propulsion is not an option, too inefficient) has a propellant force equal to a human trying to blow and the spaceship we need will be tons and tons and tons. Confused

(Hydrogen) fusion has an acceptable yield and fuel could actually be collected during flight, but we need a way to convert the released energy into propulsion. Consider

Ceterum censeo, religionem delendam esse
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
16-09-2017, 11:49 AM
RE: Entering a rotating cylinder in space and inertia gravity?
At work.

For 'Atomic' engins..... the earliest/most primitive proposed was the 'Atomic putt putt' or the original Orion.

From reading the 'Atomic Rockets' web site newer studies would seem to indicate that 'Pure Bussard ramjets' wont actually work. Sad

The very interstellar medium itself will induce enough 'drag' that scoop speeds wont be maintainable.

Though the site does propose that a scoop system could be used as a way to 'stretch' the amount of fuel needed for a mission. Extra fuel is scooped into the system to suppliment that which is carried.

Thumbsup
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: