"Evangelism" in retail marketing
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25-03-2016, 06:47 AM
"Evangelism" in retail marketing
I was at Forever 21 yesterday and saw again their trademark yellow bags with the black text. The bottom fold says "John 3:16". Not the text of the verse, just the reference. I've also noticed that In-n-Out does the same sort of thing with just bare Bible references subtly placed on their packaging.
Do they think that this is actually an effective evangelism tool? I suspect that whoever implemented this tactic is just doing it to boost their religious ego and maybe get some extra credit with God, while not actually doing anything to sales since there is essentially no mention of God/religion outside of these mostly hidden references.
When I was a believer, this did actually make me feel slightly more satisfied shopping at Forever 21 (despite a majority of their clothing being against the "Christian principle of modesty" that I was taught). Now that I'm an atheist, I find it mildly annoying when I do notice it, but ultimately ineffective since it is so very hidden.
Believers and non-believers alike: what are your thoughts on this practice?
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25-03-2016, 06:53 AM
RE: "Evangelism" in retail marketing
i noticed a shirt at walmart the other day that had a fish with a hook in its mouth. it said ''i'm hooked on jesus!'. it appeals to christies AND rednecks alike! (which are common where i live) made me chuckle a bit.
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25-03-2016, 07:23 AM
RE: "Evangelism" in retail marketing
(25-03-2016 06:47 AM)debna27 Wrote:  Believers and non-believers alike: what are your thoughts on this practice?

It's not anything worth getting annoyed over.

They sell fashion accessories. There is a market for accessories with Biblical references printed on them. It's not an evangelizing tool. It's business.

"Owl," said Rabbit shortly, "you and I have brains. The others have fluff. If there is any thinking to be done in this Forest - and when I say thinking I mean thinking - you and I must do it."
- A. A. Milne, The House at Pooh Corner
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25-03-2016, 07:39 AM
RE: "Evangelism" in retail marketing
Isn't all evangelism a marketing scheme?

"If we are honest—and scientists have to be—we must admit that religion is a jumble of false assertions, with no basis in reality.
The very idea of God is a product of the human imagination."
- Paul Dirac
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25-03-2016, 07:44 AM
RE: "Evangelism" in retail marketing
It's not an evangelism tool, it's a sales tool. The aim is to get Christians to feel that there's something more righteous about purchasing a t-shirt made using cheap foreign labor from Forever 21 than, say, from Target.
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25-03-2016, 08:34 AM
RE: "Evangelism" in retail marketing
Once I turned my back on my beliefs I started noticing how much the world is coated in religious references. The thousands of bumpers stickers, TV shows, books, and stores just to name a few that litter the landscape with these ideas. I feel it's what propagates the disillusion threw sutle brainwashing triggers. Not that it's preplaned, or a large conspiracy. Just when someone see this idea reinforced it gives the idea weight. It makes a person think "Oh this is a positive message. I want people to think i'm positive so i'll get this." Or "Other people carry these ideas so it must be true. Why else would they be saying these things?"

But to answer the question. Yeah these things make me feel a little uncomfortable. But we are in the minority. We aren't the a major target audience for corporations to aim for. They go where the money is and that's with people that believe in a god.

Don't Live each day like it's your last. Live each day like you have 541 days after that one where every choice you make will have lasting implications to you and the world around you. ~ Tim Minchin
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25-03-2016, 08:41 AM
RE: "Evangelism" in retail marketing
christians are the definition of gullible. they'll buy any cheap crap as long as jeebus is slapped on it. companies would be stupid not to cater to them. it's like my unhealthy obsession with freddy krueger. though i'm under no illusion that freddy exists (and no, i can't prove that he doesn't!)
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25-03-2016, 01:09 PM
RE: "Evangelism" in retail marketing
Even when I was a theist, it always felt like a two-year-old shouting "LOOK AT ME! LOOK AT ME! HEY HEY HEY HEY HEY LOOK!!"
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25-03-2016, 03:07 PM
RE: "Evangelism" in retail marketing
Simple for me. I refuse to buy anything from anyone who subtly proselytizes, regardless of whichever fantasy figure they're pushing. I also make a conscious effort to avoid meatgoods marked "KOSHER" and any other food products marked "HALAL". In Australia, food processing companies pay an annual accreditation fee to religious organisations such as the Jews and the Islamics to carry these certifications. Many people here consider this type of thing an involuntary religious tax, as it unfairly adds to the checkout price for all consumers.

One Australian-based halal food supplier [Global Halal Trade Centre Pty Ltd in Melbourne] confirmed that they pay between $10K to $12K a year for accreditation. Multiply that (in varying amounts) by maybe 1,000 Aussie food companies and it's easy to see where the "religious tax" is going. Maybe $10 million? And if people don't think these businesses don't pass that on to the consumers, then they're living under a rock.

Interestingly, this company was only one of the almost sole respondents to a halal certification pricing question asked of dozens of food suppliers by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) Fact Check Network site. They reported that the majority of suppliers refused to divulge any details whatsoever of their halal certification costs. I wonder why?

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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