Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
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06-03-2013, 05:47 PM
Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
web.mit.edu Wrote:Since the mid-1800s, doctors have used drugs to induce general
anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery. Despite their widespread use,
little is known about how these drugs create such a profound loss of
consciousness.

In a new study that tracked brain activity in
human volunteers over a two-hour period as they lost and regained
consciousness, researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital
(MGH) have identified distinctive brain patterns associated with
different stages of general anesthesia. The findings shed light on how
one commonly used anesthesia drug exerts its effects, and could help
doctors better monitor patients during surgery and prevent rare cases of
patients waking up during operations.

Looks like soon enough that won't be a problem anymore. Not that it's something that happens often, according to this article it occurs in about two out of ten thousand surgeries. So 0.02% of the time.

2.5 billion seconds total
1.67 billion seconds conscious

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06-03-2013, 05:52 PM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
I wish I could be awake for every surgery... I like to experience it all, except the pain. If locals and/or some kind of general can keep me awake, I prefer that.

I have such vivid memories of every time I've been cut. Its always neat to see your own insides, in a safe environment.
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06-03-2013, 08:51 PM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
Very interesting.

There are generally 3 components to general anaesthetic.

One is for sleep, one for pain and the other for immobilization.

Sometimes a component can fail...(I'm glad this hasn't happened to me)


http://science.howstuffworks.com/anesthesia4.htm


http://science.howstuffworks.com/anesthesia5.htm


Fascinating stuff, really Sleepy Especially as it's not really known how it works! Ohmy

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06-03-2013, 08:57 PM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
I wanted to see my C-section... It would have been interesting. (But that's because I want to be a pathologist, so I have a fascination with the human body.)

I have heard of this before. It freaks me out. I've heard of people feeling everything, but were unable to tell the doctors to stop. They felt every tug and cut *shudder* They were trapped in their own bodies Shocking

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06-03-2013, 09:00 PM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
(06-03-2013 05:47 PM)Aspchizo Wrote:  
web.mit.edu Wrote:Since the mid-1800s, doctors have used drugs to induce general
anesthesia in patients undergoing surgery. Despite their widespread use,
little is known about how these drugs create such a profound loss of
consciousness.

In a new study that tracked brain activity in
human volunteers over a two-hour period as they lost and regained
consciousness, researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital
(MGH) have identified distinctive brain patterns associated with
different stages of general anesthesia. The findings shed light on how
one commonly used anesthesia drug exerts its effects, and could help
doctors better monitor patients during surgery and prevent rare cases of
patients waking up during operations.

Looks like soon enough that won't be a problem anymore. Not that it's something that happens often, according to this article it occurs in about two out of ten thousand surgeries. So 0.02% of the time.

A friend of mine swears she was awake during her hysterectomy. She said it was briefly terrifying. This was in the early 2000s....if she was awake...she wasn't awake long...but she swore she heard someone say...oh shit.

The sun rises in the West and the bird shits on the coffeetable.


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06-03-2013, 09:05 PM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
(06-03-2013 09:00 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  ...but she swore she heard someone say...oh shit.
"Oh, shit!" is on my list of top 5 things I never want to hear a doctor say when they are treating me.

Sadcryface2

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06-03-2013, 09:23 PM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
(06-03-2013 09:05 PM)Peanut Wrote:  
(06-03-2013 09:00 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  ...but she swore she heard someone say...oh shit.
"Oh, shit!" is on my list of top 5 things I never want to hear a doctor say when they are treating me.

Sadcryface2

No kidding.

The sun rises in the West and the bird shits on the coffeetable.


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08-03-2013, 05:25 AM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
There was a frightening case of this I heard of concerning a woman who had to have an eye removed due to cancer. During the surgery, the anesthesiologist failed to administer the correct dosage of sodium thiopental to render her unconscious. She was also given Palvulon, a muscle relaxant, which is very painful to introduce into a person who is not under general anesthesia. She claimed the pain was so bad she thought she had died and gone to hell.

Due to this experience she has served as an expert witness in court cases against the use of lethal injection as capital punishment, since one of the drugs used in the process is Palvulon.

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09-03-2013, 02:56 PM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
(06-03-2013 09:05 PM)Peanut Wrote:  
(06-03-2013 09:00 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  ...but she swore she heard someone say...oh shit.
"Oh, shit!" is on my list of top 5 things I never want to hear a doctor say when they are treating me.

Sadcryface2

Followed by:

"Oops."

And,

"Was this on the inside or the outside when we started?"

E 2 = (mc 2)2 + (pc )2
614C → 714N + e + ̅νe
2 K(s) + 2 H2O(l) → 2 KOH(aq) + H2 (g) + 196 kJ/mol
It works, bitches.
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09-03-2013, 03:19 PM
RE: Ever hear of someone waking up during surgery?
(08-03-2013 05:25 AM)Carlo_The_Bugsmasher_Driver Wrote:  There was a frightening case of this I heard of concerning a woman who had to have an eye removed due to cancer. During the surgery, the anesthesiologist failed to administer the correct dosage of sodium thiopental to render her unconscious. She was also given Palvulon, a muscle relaxant, which is very painful to introduce into a person who is not under general anesthesia. She claimed the pain was so bad she thought she had died and gone to hell.

Due to this experience she has served as an expert witness in court cases against the use of lethal injection as capital punishment, since one of the drugs used in the process is Palvulon.
There is no mention of pain in the side effects list in the monograph for Pavulon. This makes sense as it is a non-depolarizing muscle relaxant that simply causes muscle weakness. On the other hand Succinyl choline is a depolarizing relaxant that first causes muscle contractions that can be painful before it causes weakness. It is used for intubation because it is much more short acting than Pavulon so the risk of severe hypoxia is reduced if intubation is impossible. Pavulon and Succinyl choline are still used but Sodium Thiopental is no longer available due to ( I believe ) its use in lethal injection with which the drug company does not want to be associated.
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