Everlasting War
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27-06-2013, 12:45 PM
RE: Everlasting War
cjlr, I have to agree that it is important to not allow simplistic explanations for state actions to intrude into a discussion of those state actions. I will also agree that perhaps the OP was too simplistic.

I must also say that the US has engaged in everlasting war as a tool of state power since the end of world war 2 at least. An argument can even be made for off and on starting with the end of the civil war, If one wants to include all the agression against native americans one could make the argument that it has been that way since its founding. One can also argue that the period between world war 1 and 2 was quiet only because of the difficulties caused by the depression. If the proverbial calling of a spade a spade offends someone it may at least jostle their thoughts.

As someone who came into adulthood in the late 60's it does very much feel like my country the US is engaged in everlasting war.
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27-06-2013, 02:00 PM
Everlasting War
The recent countries jah mentioned as part murcas wars, Iraq, Bosnia, Afghanistan, Syria are direct results of U.S. imperialism.

There are many wars that the u.s. is not responsible for but the ones mentioned by jah, are results of U.S. policy.
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27-06-2013, 04:47 PM
RE: Everlasting War
How on earth was the Bosnian war a direct result of US foreign policy...?

I don't talk gay, I don't walk gay, it's like people don't even know I'm gay unless I'm blowing them.
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27-06-2013, 05:21 PM
RE: Everlasting War
(26-06-2013 05:39 AM)JAH Wrote:  I find it interesting that some here have dismissed the OP and some subsequent posts as some form of US bashing and therefore can be ignored out of hand.

I will make it simple for those posters by only asking about one of those violent incursions by the US. Were the reasons for invading Iraq rational and did that invasion provide a positive result for both the Iraqi and US public.

You get an automatic +1 for freeing Iraq of Hussein but that becomes a 0 when you add it to the -1 of al-Maliki and the rest of the only semi functional Iraqi government.

OK get me to just +5 and I will concede. You do realize that I have an easier task with the negatives than you do with the positives, I hope.

actually it's -1 for propping up hussein for decades. Drinking Beverage

If we went through all covert and overt military operations since ww2 we would be at about -100?
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27-06-2013, 05:24 PM
RE: Everlasting War
(26-06-2013 07:04 AM)bemore Wrote:  Whilst the US has spearheaded many "campaigns", all of their allies (I include my own UK goverment) have allowed them to. Americas Allies are just as guilty, they are direct and indirect accomplices.

I think there are multiple reasons for wars.

All throughout history they all have in common...

1: I want (insert object/belief/goal)
2: I wish to preserve (Insert object/belief/goal)

As humanity has evolved it gets more complicated. When the dollar was made the worlds reserve currency this then empowered America economically. Anything that may threaten this power needs to be dealt with. So I think the recent conflicts of Iraq and libya fall under category 2 (I wish to preserve, seeing as Saddam has stopped selling his oil in petrodollars and Qaddafi was in the final stages of making the Gold Dinar) The fact that armaments that can help drive an economy that need to be used up so more can be purchased and that money can be made by private organisations by rebuilding the smashed up infrastructure of these countries is just secondary in my eyes.

Its going to be very interesting to see what happens with regards to Syria and Iran.

Qadafi was also on the verge of bringing billions of dollars to his country due to planned water systems, Libya sits on huge water aquifers. He was also on the verge of creating an african union with an african money system.
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27-06-2013, 05:32 PM
RE: Everlasting War
(27-06-2013 04:47 PM)earmuffs Wrote:  How on earth was the Bosnian war a direct result of US foreign policy...?

are you seriously asking for an answer?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2002/apr...es.comment

The U.S. played a crucial role in the break up of yugoslavia. Yugoslavia was a successful communist country even while russias economy was failing and it was an anti-western nation. The U.S. does it what it does best, divides people up by ethnicity, funds both or one side to further pull apart a nation until you get what remains of it today. The article above directly talks about how the U.S. funded and armed extremist muslims to help divide the nation up into muslim sections and non muslim sections. And at this same time by mere coincidence Alqaeda and bin laden make visits and send fighters former yugoslavia to coincidentally do the work that coincidentally the U.S. wanted done.

All these coincidences with alqaeda doing what NATO/U.S. wants done has to make your cock hard.....I am glad they are just coincidences though....that keep happening over and over.
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