Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
06-01-2015, 02:32 PM
Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
[Image: 04fapmc.jpg]

[Image: dog-shaking.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-01-2015, 02:38 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
(06-01-2015 02:32 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  [Image: 04fapmc.jpg]

Simple rounding to the nearest number. $7.996 rounded.

QED.

"I don't mind being wrong...it's a time I get to learn something new..."
Me.
N.B: I routinely make edits to posts to correct grammar or spelling, or to restate a point more clearly. I only notify edits if they materially change meaning.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-01-2015, 02:39 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
The pump doesn't calculate tenths of a cent...it rounds up.
Still bullshit though. Dodgy
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-01-2015, 02:45 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
(06-01-2015 02:39 PM)pablo Wrote:  The pump doesn't calculate tenths of a cent...it rounds up.
Still bullshit though. Dodgy

Yeah, but $7.996 =/= $8. It equals $7.996, and that isn't $8, so you should not be able to charge $8 for it.

[Image: dog-shaking.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-01-2015, 02:47 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
(06-01-2015 02:45 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  
(06-01-2015 02:39 PM)pablo Wrote:  The pump doesn't calculate tenths of a cent...it rounds up.
Still bullshit though. Dodgy

Yeah, but $7.996 =/= $8. It equals $7.996, and that isn't $8, so you should not be able to charge $8 for it.

Meh...take a penny from the tray.... Smartass

"I don't mind being wrong...it's a time I get to learn something new..."
Me.
N.B: I routinely make edits to posts to correct grammar or spelling, or to restate a point more clearly. I only notify edits if they materially change meaning.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-01-2015, 02:47 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
I'm sorry I'm still reeling over $1.99 a gallon.


But as if to knock me down, reality came around
And without so much as a mere touch, cut me into little pieces

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-01-2015, 02:49 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
(06-01-2015 02:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  I'm sorry I'm still reeling over $1.99 a gallon.

That's actually expensive. Across the river in Denham it's $1.93.

[Image: dog-shaking.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-01-2015, 02:52 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
(06-01-2015 02:47 PM)Momsurroundedbyboys Wrote:  I'm sorry I'm still reeling over $1.99 a gallon.

$1.85/gallon at my house.....I can drive a few miles south and get $1.83 but, eh, not worth it.


there are a few perks about living in a backwards state....low gasoline prices and beautiful weather.


"Life is a daring adventure or it is nothing"--Helen Keller
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
06-01-2015, 02:57 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
Quote:Blame the tax man — and subsequent market opportunism.

In 1919, according to the U.S. Department of Energy, gas prices averaged about $0.25. At the time, though, record keeping and price monitoring were not all that robust, and prices varied significantly from state to state and from gas station to gas station; in some places, a gallon of gas could cost as little as 15 cents. Consumers were willing purchasers, regardless, as one’s car needs fuel in order to get anywhere. Similarly, the nation needed roads, and it made sense to tax gasoline sales to fund those avenues — after all, drivers were the ones who were going to use them. Oregon introduced the nation’s first gas tax that same year — and it was a significant one, at 5 cents per gallon. Other states soon instituted their own gas taxes, but not all were as pricey as Oregon’s. After all, a 10% to 33% tax is on the high end, even by today’s standards.

As these taxes became more popular, they caused a problem for the gas companies. This was especially true as the economy contracted dramatically during the Great Depression, as explained by the chief economist of the American Petroleum Institute, John Felmy. In 2011, Felmy told Reuters that gas prices fell to ten cents during the Great Depression and, at the same time, the Federal government instituted a 1.5 cent per gallon tax. (The Department of Energy link above has gas falling to $0.18 per gallon in 1933, but that’s an average across the country and over the course of a full year.) The fuel companies didn’t want to bear the full burden of the tax, so they decided to pass that cost onto the consumer in the form of a price hike. But rounding up to the full penny wasn’t something drivers could handle due to the financial troubles of the era, and the increasingly-competitive roadside gas stations didn’t dare round that half-cent up to a full one. (And in case you don’t want to trust an industry talking head, American Public Media’s Marketplace show has similar anecdotes from everyday people.)

The fractional-cent tax has become entrenched over the years; the Federal gas tax is 18.4 cents and not a single state tax rounds that to a whole penny. Consumers, over time, have become used to the fractional cent’s inclusion and likely ignore it. In turn, gas retailers used it to their advantage. Instead of pricing gas a $3.99 a gallon, it’s priced at $3.999 simply because consumers don’t tend to recognize the difference. All those overlooked parts of a penny add up, too; nationwide, those nine-tenths total up to around $200 million to $400 million of additional revenue each year.

~http://nowiknow.com/nine-tenths-of-a-cent/

[Image: ZF1ZJ4M.jpg]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes houseofcantor's post
06-01-2015, 03:00 PM
RE: Explain to me how this is not false advertisement?
(06-01-2015 02:45 PM)kingschosen Wrote:  
(06-01-2015 02:39 PM)pablo Wrote:  The pump doesn't calculate tenths of a cent...it rounds up.
Still bullshit though. Dodgy

Yeah, but $7.996 =/= $8. It equals $7.996, and that isn't $8, so you should not be able to charge $8 for it.

Look at the price per gallon and the gallon amount...both measured to 3 decimal places.
Price total, 2 decimal places.
.996=1.00 rounded.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: