Facilitated Communication
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27-11-2015, 05:58 PM
RE: Facilitated Communication
(27-11-2015 04:28 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  
(27-11-2015 04:05 PM)jockmcdock Wrote:  Another test might be to pair British facilitators with American children and vice versa. If the American children start using words like "pavement" instead of "sidewalk" etc...and that's one of the more obvious differences. "Harbour" vs "Harbor", "courgette" vs "zuchinni". The list goes on and on...

Very good idea. The thing is, some of the kids being helped aren't even looking at the keyboard. They're looking around the room or up at the ceiling while the person holding their hand is guiding their hands to the keys to spell the words. There's no possible way that these children are actually typing these words. I couldn't do it without looking at the keyboard or having a home reference point for my hands while my fingers type on the board.

In the film they did a double blind study which clearly shows it to be more of a belief system than anything else.

The actual studies debunked completely - it is utter woo. Drinking Beverage

Skepticism is not a position; it is an approach to claims.
Science is not a subject, but a method.
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27-11-2015, 10:33 PM
RE: Facilitated Communication
(27-11-2015 05:32 PM)jockmcdock Wrote:  ... i can't not look at the keyboard and I've been writing programs, emails etc since 1968. Sometimes, I look at the screen and see I've been typing capitals (which idiot put the Caps lock key - a key you hardly ever use - next to one you use all the time?). So backspace and retype.
I've been typing for about 29 years. I can type without looking at the keyboard or screen. But then again, unlike the challenged ones there, I have my fingers on the keyboard already. These people are doing the equivalent of hunt & peck, which requires it.
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29-11-2015, 08:24 AM
RE: Facilitated Communication
Only rational people might be convinced by the "dialect test." I have used it in court, and it only seems to work with people not convinced of the reality of FC. The FC people are capable of excusing or rationalizing the problems away.

We already have instances in which the subject seems to type in a language he or she should not be familiar with, the ultimate version of the test. When that happens, the facilitated communication people just imagine the subject to be even more of a genius than previously assumed. This can be seen in a Dutch article, "Het wonder van Thiandi," in which the nonverbal girl raised in the Netherlands seemed type in English.

"Na een paar uur begint Thiandi haar eerste woorden te vormen, ondersteund door iemand van het instituut. 'En nog wel in het Engels', schrijft haar moeder. 'Ik kon het niet geloven.'

"After a few hours, Thiandi begins to form words, supported by a member of the Institute. 'Even in English' wrote her mother. 'I could not believe it.' These were not fringe types doing it either. This was at the Syracuse University Facilitated Communication Institute.

http://www.volkskrant.nl/archief/het-won...~a3286315/

In a case I worked on between 2008-2014, the observant Jewish parents suddenly, according to the typing, seemed to adopt Evangical religious views. The typing also brought the dead dog back to life with a different name! The many factual and linguistic discrepancies pointing to the facilitator as author were troubling to everyone except the FC-friendly judge and prosecutors.

In the movie "A Mother's Courage," the young non-verbal Icelandic boy is made to type "I am real" rather than something like "Ég er ekta." This was hand-waved away in the movie rather than being taken as evidence that the English language facilitator was the author. In her version of FC, called "Rapid Prompting," the facilitator hold the board rather than the person. In the movie, they don't even try to hide moving the board around to cue the letter selections.

Years ago, a false accusation case required that the accused parents have a Spanish interpreter. Their young non-verbal daughter had supposedly accused them by typing in English. Eventually, it was shown that the girl couldn't communicate via FC, and the family won $750,000.

A case in Chicago involved a girl being taken to Israel and suddenly seeming to type in Hebrew.

The point is that the FC do not care much about even well-done blinded tests. In fact, there are almost 40 scientific studies showing that FC is authorship by the facilitator. As I said in the Stubblefield case--I was the last witness to testify--FC has become the "single most discredited intervention in all of developmental disabilities." These people soldier on as though FC works, publishing articles in FC-friendly journals and pushing FC into schools and treatment centers, sometimes under alternative names. This points to more false accusations, rapes, and people with autism denied effective treatments.

James T. Todd, Ph.D.
Eastern Michigan University

(27-11-2015 05:58 PM)Chas Wrote:  
(27-11-2015 04:28 PM)dancefortwo Wrote:  Very good idea. The thing is, some of the kids being helped aren't even looking at the keyboard. They're looking around the room or up at the ceiling while the person holding their hand is guiding their hands to the keys to spell the words. There's no possible way that these children are actually typing these words. I couldn't do it without looking at the keyboard or having a home reference point for my hands while my fingers type on the board.

In the film they did a double blind study which clearly shows it to be more of a belief system than anything else.

The actual studies debunked completely - it is utter woo. :cup:
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30-11-2015, 05:09 PM
RE: Facilitated Communication
(29-11-2015 08:24 AM)JamesTTodd Wrote:  "Na een paar uur begint Thiandi haar eerste woorden te vormen, ondersteund door iemand van het instituut. 'En nog wel in het Engels', schrijft haar moeder. 'Ik kon het niet geloven.'

Oh, wow. I suggested the differences between UK English and US English might be revealing. But going from Dutch to English??? You can't be serious!

Ik kan het ook niet geloven.

(I speak Dutch).
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