Fallacy Files
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18-06-2013, 08:47 PM (This post was last modified: 19-06-2013 06:25 AM by Full Circle.)
Fallacy Files
I want to share this website because we often see on this forum people being accused of such-and-such fallacy. I had no idea there were this many and the website does a good job of explaining each one.

Look along the left side of the page and scroll down a bit to see them listed alphabetically. Quite the education for me. Smartass

Enjoy.

http://www.fallacyfiles.org/

Has anyone here ever heard of the Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy? If you can explain it before looking it up you get extra Likes on your post or a special thread singing your praises. Honor system applies.

"Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.” ~ Ambrose Bierce
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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19-06-2013, 10:17 AM
RE: Fallacy Files
Nice find there.

Turns out I could only remember one part of the Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy. This may be a hint for others:
[Image: le22.jpg]

[Image: atheistsignature.jpg]
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19-06-2013, 01:01 PM
RE: Fallacy Files
(19-06-2013 10:17 AM)yumeji Wrote:  Nice find there.

Turns out I could only remember one part of the Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy. This may be a hint for others:
[Image: le22.jpg]

That looks right!

"Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.” ~ Ambrose Bierce
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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22-06-2013, 11:57 AM
RE: Fallacy Files
(18-06-2013 08:47 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Has anyone here ever heard of the Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy? If you can explain it before looking it up you get extra Likes on your post or a special thread singing your praises. Honor system applies.

Yes, I know of it... I'm quite familiar with all many of the common ones. It's likened to shooting the side of a barn and then drawing a target around where the shot landed to make it look like a skilled shot. In real life, it's where somebody declares that a specific goal was intended while intention wasn't originally known and can only be seen in hindsight. I can even give a theistic example...

There was recently a thread about Daniel's prophecy that supposedly predicted when Jesus would die. This is done by counting 483 weeks, starting with the week that "Artaxerxes I Longimanus gave [permission] to Nehemiah" (according to the Wikipedia link) and ending with Jesus' crucifixion in 32 or 33 CE.

However, this is clearly a case of Texas Sharpshooting. For one thing, the prediction didn't actually help anyone see Jesus' death coming ahead of time, making it technically a "postdiction", which invites the hindsight bias. Why would the countdown end with Jesus' death rather than his birth? Why would it start with an arbitrary event like an edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem? The math was figured out by somebody after the fact -- and then tinkered with to lessen it from 490 years to 483 and then even to 476 "prophetic years" because the math didn't fit any known time distance. Finally it fit a couple of dates and Jesus' death was declared to have been the target... after the fact.

I've got one for you guys: Equivocation. Bonus points for whomever can come up with an example.

My girlfriend is mad at me. Perhaps I shouldn't have tried cooking a stick in her non-stick pan.
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22-06-2013, 12:33 PM
RE: Fallacy Files
Example

A big stone is hard. Something that is hard,is not easy. That is why stones are not easy to trow

KC IS A LIAR!!!! HE PROMISED ME VANILLA CAKES AND GAVE ME STRAWBERRY CAKE Weeping
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22-06-2013, 12:39 PM
RE: Fallacy Files
1.The jacket fits me.
2. The jacket fits in my bag.
3.ergo: i fit in my bag

KC IS A LIAR!!!! HE PROMISED ME VANILLA CAKES AND GAVE ME STRAWBERRY CAKE Weeping
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22-06-2013, 02:53 PM
RE: Fallacy Files
(22-06-2013 11:57 AM)Starcrash Wrote:  
(18-06-2013 08:47 PM)Full Circle Wrote:  Has anyone here ever heard of the Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy? If you can explain it before looking it up you get extra Likes on your post or a special thread singing your praises. Honor system applies.

Yes, I know of it... I'm quite familiar with all many of the common ones. It's likened to shooting the side of a barn and then drawing a target around where the shot landed to make it look like a skilled shot. In real life, it's where somebody declares that a specific goal was intended while intention wasn't originally known and can only be seen in hindsight. I can even give a theistic example...

There was recently a thread about Daniel's prophecy that supposedly predicted when Jesus would die. This is done by counting 483 weeks, starting with the week that "Artaxerxes I Longimanus gave [permission] to Nehemiah" (according to the Wikipedia link) and ending with Jesus' crucifixion in 32 or 33 CE.

However, this is clearly a case of Texas Sharpshooting. For one thing, the prediction didn't actually help anyone see Jesus' death coming ahead of time, making it technically a "postdiction", which invites the hindsight bias. Why would the countdown end with Jesus' death rather than his birth? Why would it start with an arbitrary event like an edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem? The math was figured out by somebody after the fact -- and then tinkered with to lessen it from 490 years to 483 and then even to 476 "prophetic years" because the math didn't fit any known time distance. Finally it fit a couple of dates and Jesus' death was declared to have been the target... after the fact.

I've got one for you guys: Equivocation. Bonus points for whomever can come up with an example.

You know your stuff!

This fallacy is somewhat similar to false correlation. There is a saying in the stock market that invokes "the price of tea in India". Somebody ran an algorithm and found that the above correlated the best with US stock prices yet in reality it has no correlation. This is data mining at it's worst. Make the results fit the premise.

Draw the graph and THEN plot the points is another similar situation.

"Ocean: A body of water occupying about two-thirds of a world made for man - who has no gills.” ~ Ambrose Bierce
“I am quite sure now that often, very often, in matters concerning religion and politics a man's reasoning powers are not above the monkey's." - Mark Twain in Eruption
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