Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
25-08-2017, 06:15 AM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
(24-08-2017 09:26 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  In general, what experience (education primarily but any other relevant experiences too) does everyone have with the earth sciences? (geology, paleontology, climate science, paleoclimatology, etc). Please indicate any high school classes or college classes as well as if you're a theist, agnostic, atheist, etc

In addition to this, please answer these questions specific to earth science to the best of your ability (you can obviously look things up if you're unclear but I want to know what you believe):
1) how old is the earth?
2) do fossils provide reliable support for the theory of evolution?
3) are fossil distributions consistent with the earth being old (consistent with geology) or young (consistent with literal interpretations of the Bible by young earth creationists)?
4) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing environmental conditions in ancient sediments and/or experienced by fossilized organisms?
5) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing dietary habits of fossilized organisms?
6) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes to reconstruct climate histories and perturbations of the global carbon cycle?
7) do you believe in climate change (not affiliated with human activities)?
8) do you believe humans are contributing to climate change?
9) does the earth have a singular climate? Or is climate something specific to a limited area on earth? (How do answers to these questions relate to climate change in general?)
10) what other issues are you aware of around the globe that endanger humans and ecosystems that are associated with human activities and/or climate change?

(Note: I've posted the same questions on the "DebateAChristian" subreddit and on Christianforums.com and on atheistforums.org for anyone who may frequent any of them and experience deja vu)


1: I invented it and you all last Saturday night. On a dare.
2: I wouldn't say my old man is very evolved.
3: He's 89!
4: It's just spices I found in the celestial garden. I didn't know what it'd taste like until it was cooked. It tastes kind of off.
5: Look, I didn't know. I know your lives are hard, but I was drunk! I grabbed what was close to hand.
6: Look, I had the biggest hangover ever. Give me a break.
7: It was hot 3 days ago. Today the wind was cold.
8: Well if cattle do....
9: Mate, I'm just letting the game play out. I told you. I was drunk.
10: The end of the game.

IHTH. Thumbsup

Wink

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Banjo's post
25-08-2017, 10:16 AM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
(24-08-2017 09:26 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  In general, what experience (education primarily but any other relevant experiences too) does everyone have with the earth sciences? (geology, paleontology, climate science, paleoclimatology, etc). Please indicate any high school classes or college classes as well as if you're a theist, agnostic, atheist, etc

In addition to this, please answer these questions specific to earth science to the best of your ability (you can obviously look things up if you're unclear but I want to know what you believe):
1) how old is the earth?
2) do fossils provide reliable support for the theory of evolution?
3) are fossil distributions consistent with the earth being old (consistent with geology) or young (consistent with literal interpretations of the Bible by young earth creationists)?
4) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing environmental conditions in ancient sediments and/or experienced by fossilized organisms?
5) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing dietary habits of fossilized organisms?
6) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes to reconstruct climate histories and perturbations of the global carbon cycle?
7) do you believe in climate change (not affiliated with human activities)?
8) do you believe humans are contributing to climate change?
9) does the earth have a singular climate? Or is climate something specific to a limited area on earth? (How do answers to these questions relate to climate change in general?)
10) what other issues are you aware of around the globe that endanger humans and ecosystems that are associated with human activities and/or climate change?

(Note: I've posted the same questions on the "DebateAChristian" subreddit and on Christianforums.com and on atheistforums.org for anyone who may frequent any of them and experience deja vu)

Atheist - Normal science classes for the average US high school student in the 70's. College level chemistry and math. Note I refuse to call them "maths" as the Brits do! What do they know about English anyway? Drinking Beverage

1) Around 4.5 billion years old.
2) Yes.
3) Yes.
4-6) Yes, wouldn't say I understand it well. Need to learn more about it all.
7) Yes.
8) Most definitely.
9) Not quite sure how to answer this one. Each area certainly has its own climate but with a layman's understanding I cannot see how we can adversely effect some parts and not the whole. I find this hard to articulate.
10) Our inability to see our actions have consequences, our love of toxic chemicals, war, conspicuous consumption, believing some sky daddy will comeback so nothing we do to the planet matters, deforestation, habitat encroachment, poaching, and on and on.

" Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous."
David Hume
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes KidCharlemagne1962's post
25-08-2017, 10:34 AM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
1) how old is the earth?
How would I know. Oh I guess I'll take sciences word on it.
2) do fossils provide reliable support for the theory of evolution?
They contribute to a large body of evidence. The leading evidence is in genetics.
3) are fossil distributions consistent with the earth being old (consistent with geology) or young (consistent with literal interpretations of the Bible by young earth creationists)?
What a pain in the ass this is turning into.
4) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing environmental conditions in ancient sediments and/or experienced by fossilized organisms?
No. What's your point? There are people who are and most of them are atheists.
For a reason.
5) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing dietary habits of fossilized organisms?
Ditto
6) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes to reconstruct climate histories and perturbations of the global carbon cycle?
Ditto
7) do you believe in climate change (not affiliated with human activities)?
Yes. I don't need to know the science to understand that billions of automobiles and industry pumping bad shit into the atmosphere is gonna leave a mark. The details are petty much irrelevant.
8) do you believe humans are contributing to climate change?
Do you believe that humans are contributing to acid rain? And river pollution (some of which have gotten so bad that they actually used to catch on fire)? I'd be surprised if all the crap we are putting in the atmosphere didn't manifest as some type of change.
9) does the earth have a singular climate? Or is climate something specific to a limited area on earth? (How do answers to these questions relate to climate change in general?) There are climates all over the earth. But they are all effected by each other.
10) what other issues are you aware of around the globe that endanger humans and ecosystems that are associated with human activities and/or climate change?
Religion and stupidity.

[Image: anigif_enhanced-26851-1450298712-2.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
25-08-2017, 10:42 AM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
(24-08-2017 09:26 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  In general, what experience (education primarily but any other relevant experiences too) does everyone have with the earth sciences? (geology, paleontology, climate science, paleoclimatology, etc). Please indicate any high school classes or college classes as well as if you're a theist, agnostic, atheist, etc

In addition to this, please answer these questions specific to earth science to the best of your ability (you can obviously look things up if you're unclear but I want to know what you believe):
1) how old is the earth?
2) do fossils provide reliable support for the theory of evolution?
3) are fossil distributions consistent with the earth being old (consistent with geology) or young (consistent with literal interpretations of the Bible by young earth creationists)?
4) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing environmental conditions in ancient sediments and/or experienced by fossilized organisms?
5) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing dietary habits of fossilized organisms?
6) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes to reconstruct climate histories and perturbations of the global carbon cycle?
7) do you believe in climate change (not affiliated with human activities)?
8) do you believe humans are contributing to climate change?
9) does the earth have a singular climate? Or is climate something specific to a limited area on earth? (How do answers to these questions relate to climate change in general?)
10) what other issues are you aware of around the globe that endanger humans and ecosystems that are associated with human activities and/or climate change?

(Note: I've posted the same questions on the "DebateAChristian" subreddit and on Christianforums.com and on atheistforums.org for anyone who may frequent any of them and experience deja vu)

Atheist

I have a degree in anthropology with a focus on primate behavior and evolution. I switched more to paleoanthropology towards the end of my collegiate career. As you know, I dug for fossils in Tanzania. We received lectures on geology, paleoenvironment reconstruction, and much more.

1) Somewhere between 4.5 billion years and your mom.
2) Yes, and modern analogs are good examples of how those evolutionary antecedents may have lived.
3) Old
4) Yes, see my answer above
5) Yes, see above. See also my article here. I mention C4 and C3 food analysis.
6) Yes, ... (regarding #4 - 6, I am in no way an expert)
7) Of course, there's a long history of climate change going back billions of years. Ask your mom.
8) Yes, we are producing carbon emissions much faster than the natural cycle can reabsorb it.
9) People often confuse local weather patterns with overall world climate. I believe the interactions between these various weather systems make up earth's overall climate, sort of like a living patchwork. Changes in one can drastically affect the others.
10) Deforestation is a good one
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like ghostexorcist's post
25-08-2017, 10:48 AM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
MsC in electronics, including the *usual* physics etc. + lots of interest in science in general -> YT is your friend (if you can find a decent docu)
Atheist, pretty high on the Dawkins scale

Quote:1) how old is the earth?
4.5bio
Quote:2) do fossils provide reliable support for the theory of evolution?
very much so
Quote:3) are fossil distributions consistent with the earth being old (consistent with geology) or young (consistent with literal interpretations of the Bible by young earth creationists)?
consistent with 1)
Quote:4) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing environmental conditions in ancient sediments and/or experienced by fossilized organisms?
nope
Quote:5) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing dietary habits of fossilized organisms?
nope
Quote:6) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes to reconstruct climate histories and perturbations of the global carbon cycle?
nope, but i can make an oscillator for you if you want? Big Grin
Quote:7) do you believe in climate change (not affiliated with human activities)?
sure, because its a well established fact
Quote:8) do you believe humans are contributing to climate change?
yep
Quote:9) does the earth have a singular climate? Or is climate something specific to a limited area on earth? (How do answers to these questions relate to climate change in general?)
Not sure if i understood the question. Climate is everywhere, but different ones in different parts of the globe, so the latter?
Quote:10) what other issues are you aware of around the globe that endanger humans and ecosystems that are associated with human activities and/or climate change?
Overfertilizing our soils

Ceterum censeo, religionem delendam esse
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like Deesse23's post
25-08-2017, 12:20 PM (This post was last modified: 25-08-2017 12:29 PM by Thoreauvian.)
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
(25-08-2017 10:42 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  Yes, we are producing carbon emissions much faster than the natural cycle can reabsorb it.

You mentioned a point which is rather confusing. The oceans and biosphere absorb about half of the CO2 we emit, but that doesn't mean that if we decreased our emissions by half, all would be well. Once the carbon has been dug up from where it is sequestered underground and introduced into the carbon cycle above-ground, it will continue to cycle in and out of the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans over time, and only chemical weathering over a very much longer period of time (hundreds and thousands of years) will remove it by re-sequestering it, usually as limestone deposits on the bottom of the ocean. So the point is, we are spending a certain "carbon budget" no matter how fast or slow we burn fossil fuels. How hot it will get depends on how much we burn. So slowing down would only give us more time to stop completely. It won't solve the problem.

At least that's the way I understand it so far. Please correct me if I'm wrong. You may know better.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Thoreauvian's post
25-08-2017, 12:44 PM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
(25-08-2017 12:20 PM)Thoreauvian Wrote:  
(25-08-2017 10:42 AM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  Yes, we are producing carbon emissions much faster than the natural cycle can reabsorb it.

You mentioned a point which is rather confusing. The oceans and biosphere absorb about half of the CO2 we emit, but that doesn't mean that if we decreased our emissions by half, all would be well. Once the carbon has been dug up from where it is sequestered underground and introduced into the carbon cycle above-ground, it will continue to cycle in and out of the atmosphere, biosphere, and oceans over time, and only chemical weathering over a very much longer period of time (hundreds and thousands of years) will remove it by re-sequestering it, usually as limestone deposits on the bottom of the ocean. So the point is, we are spending a certain "carbon budget" no matter how fast or slow we burn fossil fuels. How hot it will get depends on how much we burn. So slowing down would only give us more time to stop completely. It won't solve the problem.

At least that's the way I understand it so far. Please correct me if I'm wrong. You may know better.

The answer to your question starts around minute 6:09 of this video, but watch the entire thing for context. Youtuber Potholer54, or Australian science journalist Peter Hadfield, is an awesome source for climate science information, especially debunking of anti-science bloggers.



Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 2 users Like ghostexorcist's post
25-08-2017, 04:19 PM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
(25-08-2017 12:44 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  The answer to your question starts around minute 6:09 of this video, but watch the entire thing for context. Youtuber Potholer54, or Australian science journalist Peter Hadfield, is an awesome source for climate science information, especially debunking of anti-science bloggers.

Yes, the whole video was worth watching, and reminds me of the kinds of confusions we see so often with the scientifically ill-informed at this site, who don't know what the science actually says before they start arguing about it.

Thanks.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
27-08-2017, 11:18 PM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
(25-08-2017 04:19 PM)Thoreauvian Wrote:  
(25-08-2017 12:44 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  The answer to your question starts around minute 6:09 of this video, but watch the entire thing for context. Youtuber Potholer54, or Australian science journalist Peter Hadfield, is an awesome source for climate science information, especially debunking of anti-science bloggers.

Yes, the whole video was worth watching, and reminds me of the kinds of confusions we see so often with the scientifically ill-informed at this site, who don't know what the science actually says before they start arguing about it.

Thanks.

My pleasure
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes ghostexorcist's post
07-09-2017, 06:27 PM
RE: Familiarity with the Earth Sciences
(24-08-2017 09:26 AM)TheBeardedDude Wrote:  In general, what experience (education primarily but any other relevant experiences too) does everyone have with the earth sciences? (geology, paleontology, climate science, paleoclimatology, etc). Please indicate any high school classes or college classes as well as if you're a theist, agnostic, atheist, etc

In addition to this, please answer these questions specific to earth science to the best of your ability (you can obviously look things up if you're unclear but I want to know what you believe):
1) how old is the earth?
2) do fossils provide reliable support for the theory of evolution?
3) are fossil distributions consistent with the earth being old (consistent with geology) or young (consistent with literal interpretations of the Bible by young earth creationists)?
4) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing environmental conditions in ancient sediments and/or experienced by fossilized organisms?
5) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes for reconstructing dietary habits of fossilized organisms?
6) are you familiar with the use of stable isotopes to reconstruct climate histories and perturbations of the global carbon cycle?
7) do you believe in climate change (not affiliated with human activities)?
8) do you believe humans are contributing to climate change?
9) does the earth have a singular climate? Or is climate something specific to a limited area on earth? (How do answers to these questions relate to climate change in general?)
10) what other issues are you aware of around the globe that endanger humans and ecosystems that are associated with human activities and/or climate change?

(Note: I've posted the same questions on the "DebateAChristian" subreddit and on Christianforums.com and on atheistforums.org for anyone who may frequent any of them and experience deja vu)

I have 2 degrees in geology with an emphasis on invertebrate paleontology, although I decided to teach earth science (which I did for 13 years) before moving into administration.

1. Slightly less than 5 byo.
2. Yes, fossils are often good clues as to the evolutionary process. I was particularly interested in the evolution of rugose corals back in the day.
3. There is nothing but fables involved in the Biblical version of creation, etc. Archbishop Usher is long dead. Get over it!
4, 5, & 6. Too long ago to remember that much detail.
7. Yes. There have been many episodes of climate change before man evolved. But man is involved now.
8. Without question. The only question is to what extent.
9. Suggest you look up the Koppen climate classification system.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply
Forum Jump: