Finally building a new gaming rig!
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28-10-2014, 01:33 AM
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
(27-10-2014 10:45 PM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  
(25-10-2014 12:03 AM)Free Thought Wrote:  I think mine looks a tad more comfortable:

[Image: B00CJD4HD2_G500s_CTG_lg.jpg]

That looks like a... Logitech? Consider But yeah, more comfortable than that TORQ.

I also checked the shipping on my GTX 970 and mouse combo, and it's scheduled for early delivery! I'll have it by end-of-day Wednesday, just in time for my two nights off! My PNY XLR8 240GB SSD should be arriving the day after that on Thursday. With these, and once I upgrade my GTX 770 to another GTX 970, I'll be done fucking around with this computer for the time being. That is until I need to eventually replace my CPU, but that won't be until after we see what the Broadwell lineup is like after it releases next year. Even then, I'll probably give it another year or so and grab a cheap i7 Broadwell-E unlocked SKU chip after Skylake has launched. Tongue

[Image: pny-xlr8-pro-240gb-ssd-custom-pc-review-14.jpg]

Yeah, it's a Logitech mouse. Got it for $50 and suits my purposes just fine.

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06-11-2014, 01:04 AM
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
(13-10-2014 03:51 AM)Vosur Wrote:  
(13-10-2014 03:42 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  The PSU is a Corsair, 600watt. 600watt wont be enough so that'll also need to be replaced.
Why do you think that? I have a 580W PSU and it's more than sufficient.

I was under the impression that 600W was not that much.
Ideally you want something around 750W. Where's Phaedrus when you need him? He was in-charge of the Cooler Master PSU department. He could probably get me a cheap PSU Angel

If I can get away with 600W that's cool though.

@EK, I haven't forgotten your posts. Just haven't had the money, but I'll have the money with my next pay check (or the one after) so I'm gonna design my PC now so I know exactly how much I need.

Quote:First up is picking a new mobo. I'm quite partial to ASUS, as I've used them for every machine I've built and they've yet to let me down. I like their UEFI BIOS and their reliability. I've also heard good things about ASRock, Gigabyte, MSI, and EVGA boards as well, but I've never used one myself. After that it's a choice between Intel and AMD. I'm not that familiar with the current AMD crop, as I do tend to stick with Intel for their better optimized core performance.

Yea mine is ASUS (I think, maybe ASRock??) and haven't had any problems with.
On my last PC I used AMD. I'm more familiar with AMD brand too. You tend to get more for your dollar with AMD compared to Intel. But I'm not like a hardcore AMD fan or anything, I'll go with either.

Newegg NZ

Quote:That being said, if you invest in an Intel motherboard with the LGA1150 socket and a Z97 chipset, you'll not only have access to the latest Haswell-E refresh chips (Devil's Canyon), but it will also support Intel's 5th generation Broadwell chips that will be launching next year.

That is good to know.

Quote:Now combine that platform with nVidia's latest 2nd generation Maxwell based GPU's (the GTX900 series), these cards sip power in comparison to their earlier GTX700 series counterparts. The recommended PSU for a GTX970 is a 500 watt, so as long as your Corsair PSU is in good working order, you can get a decent GPU. I would be wary of AMD/ATI's Radeon and R7/R9 series as they have some of the loudest, most power-hungry, and hottest running cards currently available.

Power conservative is always nice. Less heat is also nice, obviously for the computer, but for me too. This thing has to go in my room and my current one is like a fucking heater which is annoying, to say the least.

I think I will give GTXwhatever series GPU's a go this round.
Try something different.

Quote:WHAT? A Pentium! Wait! Put down that tar and those feather and hear me out! The Haswell-E refresh (Devil's Canyon) included three separate CPU's. A new set of K-series unlocked SKU Core series chips (the i7 4790K @ 4GHz and the i5 4690K @ 3.5GHz that I currently have), and an unlocked '20th Anniversary' Pentium. This is that chip. It is a simple Pentium with a stock clock of 3.2GHz for two cores and no hyper-threading. That being said, many games still don't make heavy use of more than two cores, and this CPU is very overclock friendly. These things can easily reach the 4.5GHz+ range on air cooling, with very respectable performance for the super low price point. At higher clock speeds, this chip and easily swing with much more expensive CPU's in real-world game performance; and once this is no longer enough, you can easily upgrade to either a Haswell or Broadwell Core series CPU. Just make sure you get a upgraded CPU cooler to go with it.

yes, EK you beauty. This is what I need, cheap cheap processors that can be overclocked to preform like much more expensive CPU's.

OMFG IT'S ONLY $90!

I think I will go with that. It's cheap enough so that I can get it now and be justified in getting a better one, as you say either a Haswell or Boardwell core series, at a later date. I'm not really justified in updating a CPU if I spend like $250 on one.


This is what I have so far:
Which I can't buy from Newegg because NZ sucks
http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...4H81E87031
Because it's cheaper and all my harddrives, internal and external, have been seagate
Because it's the exact same product but cheaper. Probably comes from the same factory...
http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6819117374
http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6835200014
http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6813132118

All for a total of $721.74.

I than still need to get a wireless card and maybe a new case and cooling system.
So all up it'll be less than $1,000 which is incredible.

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06-11-2014, 01:58 AM
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
Ohhhh! PB Tech, the place where'd I'd most likely buy everything from, takes Q Card (a 3months interest free credit card only accepted at certain stores) which means I could buy and build this tomorrow. Stupid work, why do I have to have to work 3 days in a row?

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06-11-2014, 03:24 AM (This post was last modified: 06-11-2014 03:29 AM by Free Thought.)
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
Everybody is progressing n their plans and I'm just sitting here, envious.

Everything is so damn expensive...

Edit: Thank you Earmuffs for linking to that CPU... That is just under 3 times cheaper than what I was looking at...

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07-11-2014, 07:53 AM
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
(13-10-2014 12:10 PM)EvolutionKills Wrote:  
(13-10-2014 03:42 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  Don't remember the mobo make and model but it was cheap back when I made it (2009) so it's likely very out of date now. I was gonna replace it anyway.

The PSU is a Corsair, 600watt. 600watt wont be enough so that'll also need to be replaced.

Don't remember but it was cheap. DDR2? Maaaaaybe 3 but Im guessing 2.
I was gonna replace that anyway.

AMD something. Ummm, some quad core 2.8ghz. Phenom?
I was going to replace that too.

It's a very large case.

A ribbon of some sort.


I custom built it back in 09' so when I say Im gonna salvage it for parts I mean things like cd drive, harddrive (and I do have windows something x64 on it but I can just download whatever os I need anyway).
I was going to update pretty much everything else. Maybe even the harddrive, I think it only has a 250g which wont cunt the mustard.

Fuck it, I'll just start again. New case and everything. Not much expenses spared.

If you're looking to scrap the mobo, then everything goes. So long as the hard-drive has some sort of SATA connector for data, you can easily salvage that and just get a cheap $50~60 1TB HDD storage drive. Western Digital has a Caviar Blue (1TB, 64MB cache, 72000RPM, SATA 6Gb/s) series that regularly sells for $55 on Newegg.

First up is picking a new mobo. I'm quite partial to ASUS, as I've used them for every machine I've built and they've yet to let me down. I like their UEFI BIOS and their reliability. I've also heard good things about ASRock, Gigabyte, MSI, and EVGA boards as well, but I've never used one myself. After that it's a choice between Intel and AMD. I'm not that familiar with the current AMD crop, as I do tend to stick with Intel for their better optimized core performance.

That being said, if you invest in an Intel motherboard with the LGA1150 socket and a Z97 chipset, you'll not only have access to the latest Haswell-E refresh chips (Devil's Canyon), but it will also support Intel's 5th generation Broadwell chips that will be launching next year. Now the nice thing about Broadwell is that they will be a refined Haswell architecture, using a smaller manufacturing process (from 22nm down to 16nm), resulting in greater efficiency for less power and heat generation (and conversely better overclocking potential as the stock thermal ceiling lowers). Now combine that platform with nVidia's latest 2nd generation Maxwell based GPU's (the GTX900 series), these cards sip power in comparison to their earlier GTX700 series counterparts. The recommended PSU for a GTX970 is a 500 watt, so as long as your Corsair PSU is in good working order, you can get a decent GPU. I would be wary of AMD/ATI's Radeon and R7/R9 series as they have some of the loudest, most power-hungry, and hottest running cards currently available.


For a budget build (assuming you reuse your OS, case, and PSU), I'd go with this...

http://pcpartpicker.com/user/EvolutionKi...ved/BZBzK8


Motherboard

ASUS Z97-P

[Image: overview.png]

The latest Intel Z97 chipset and the LGA1150 socket makes this a real forward looking motherboard, able to run current Haswell-E refresh and upcoming Broadwell CPU's. The board has 4 DIMM slots and supports overclocked RAM up to 3200. No Crossfire/SLI support, but it does have on board graphics depending in the CPU, connectors for four SATA 6Gb/s (for HHD, SSD, and optical drives), on board Ethernet (Realtek 8111GR Gigabit LAN), on board audio (Realtek ALC891 8-Channel High Definition Audio CODEC), and six USB ports (four of which are USB 3.0). All of that in a standard ATX form factor, and with ASUS's EUFI BIOS and motherboard fan control.

Secondary option?

MSI Z97 PC Mate (and this board's blue accents would match the blue Corsair RAM, and this one supports Crossfire if you plan on going with a Radeon GPU)



CPU

Intel Pentium G3258

[Image: pentium-box.jpg]

WHAT? A Pentium! Wait! Put down that tar and those feather and hear me out! The Haswell-E refresh (Devil's Canyon) included three separate CPU's. A new set of K-series unlocked SKU Core series chips (the i7 4790K @ 4GHz and the i5 4690K @ 3.5GHz that I currently have), and an unlocked '20th Anniversary' Pentium. This is that chip. It is a simple Pentium with a stock clock of 3.2GHz for two cores and no hyper-threading. That being said, many games still don't make heavy use of more than two cores, and this CPU is very overclock friendly. These things can easily reach the 4.5GHz+ range on air cooling, with very respectable performance for the super low price point. At higher clock speeds, this chip and easily swing with much more expensive CPU's in real-world game performance; and once this is no longer enough, you can easily upgrade to either a Haswell or Broadwell Core series CPU. Just make sure you get a upgraded CPU cooler to go with it.

http://techreport.com/review/26735/overc...rocessor/3

[Image: c3-fps.gif]





Secondary Option?

i5 4690K (bite the bullet and get a decent i5)



Memory

Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory

[Image: veng_b_angle_1_1.png]

It's Corsair, so you are getting a quality product with a lifetime warranty. This is DDR3 RAM with a mild 1600 overclock and 9 CAS latency at 1.5 volts via Intel XMP profile. This particular set is blue, but you can also get them in black and red (and in low profile too) for a few dollars more. Get whatever you think looks best, if you're that worried about looks. This will fill up half of the motherboard's 240 pin DIMM slots, allowing for a later upgrade to 16GB by buying another matched set.

Secondary option?

G.Skill Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (also covered with a lifetime warranty)


Storage

Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive

[Image: 22-236-338-TS?$S300$]

It's WD's Blue series, offering 1TB of space in a 3.5" drive with a standard 72000RPM and 64MB cache. This is one of the cheapest 1TB drives you can get, and usually comes as a bare OEM drive. I'm actually using this one right now, and I haven't had any issues with it.

Secondary option?

Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive



Discreet Graphics Card

ASUS GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB

[Image: TopB.jpg]

GTX 750Ti from ASUS, this card is actually a first generation Maxwell GPU (the rest of the GTX700 series are older Kepler chips, and the GTX900 series is 2nd generation Maxwell). This makes the card very efficient with good performance for very low power consumption (this entire mobo/CPU/GPU setup has ~225 watt estimated usage). This one comes in around the $120 dollar range, so it'll be fine for now, but you won't be crying when you replace it for a GTX900 series later.

Secondary option?

EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB

Might actually suggest this build to a friend who is looking budget-wise. Thanks.

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07-11-2014, 07:47 PM
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  
(13-10-2014 03:51 AM)Vosur Wrote:  Why do you think that? I have a 580W PSU and it's more than sufficient.

I was under the impression that 600W was not that much.
Ideally you want something around 750W. Where's Phaedrus when you need him? He was in-charge of the Cooler Master PSU department. He could probably get me a cheap PSU Angel

If I can get away with 600W that's cool though.

@EK, I haven't forgotten your posts. Just haven't had the money, but I'll have the money with my next pay check (or the one after) so I'm gonna design my PC now so I know exactly how much I need.

Quote:First up is picking a new mobo. I'm quite partial to ASUS, as I've used them for every machine I've built and they've yet to let me down. I like their UEFI BIOS and their reliability. I've also heard good things about ASRock, Gigabyte, MSI, and EVGA boards as well, but I've never used one myself. After that it's a choice between Intel and AMD. I'm not that familiar with the current AMD crop, as I do tend to stick with Intel for their better optimized core performance.

Yea mine is ASUS (I think, maybe ASRock??) and haven't had any problems with.
On my last PC I used AMD. I'm more familiar with AMD brand too. You tend to get more for your dollar with AMD compared to Intel. But I'm not like a hardcore AMD fan or anything, I'll go with either.

Newegg NZ

Quote:That being said, if you invest in an Intel motherboard with the LGA1150 socket and a Z97 chipset, you'll not only have access to the latest Haswell-E refresh chips (Devil's Canyon), but it will also support Intel's 5th generation Broadwell chips that will be launching next year.

That is good to know.

Quote:Now combine that platform with nVidia's latest 2nd generation Maxwell based GPU's (the GTX900 series), these cards sip power in comparison to their earlier GTX700 series counterparts. The recommended PSU for a GTX970 is a 500 watt, so as long as your Corsair PSU is in good working order, you can get a decent GPU. I would be wary of AMD/ATI's Radeon and R7/R9 series as they have some of the loudest, most power-hungry, and hottest running cards currently available.

Power conservative is always nice. Less heat is also nice, obviously for the computer, but for me too. This thing has to go in my room and my current one is like a fucking heater which is annoying, to say the least.

I think I will give GTXwhatever series GPU's a go this round.
Try something different.

Quote:WHAT? A Pentium! Wait! Put down that tar and those feather and hear me out! The Haswell-E refresh (Devil's Canyon) included three separate CPU's. A new set of K-series unlocked SKU Core series chips (the i7 4790K @ 4GHz and the i5 4690K @ 3.5GHz that I currently have), and an unlocked '20th Anniversary' Pentium. This is that chip. It is a simple Pentium with a stock clock of 3.2GHz for two cores and no hyper-threading. That being said, many games still don't make heavy use of more than two cores, and this CPU is very overclock friendly. These things can easily reach the 4.5GHz+ range on air cooling, with very respectable performance for the super low price point. At higher clock speeds, this chip and easily swing with much more expensive CPU's in real-world game performance; and once this is no longer enough, you can easily upgrade to either a Haswell or Broadwell Core series CPU. Just make sure you get a upgraded CPU cooler to go with it.

yes, EK you beauty. This is what I need, cheap cheap processors that can be overclocked to preform like much more expensive CPU's.

OMFG IT'S ONLY $90!

I think I will go with that. It's cheap enough so that I can get it now and be justified in getting a better one, as you say either a Haswell or Boardwell core series, at a later date. I'm not really justified in updating a CPU if I spend like $250 on one.


This is what I have so far:
Which I can't buy from Newegg because NZ sucks
http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...4H81E87031
Because it's cheaper and all my harddrives, internal and external, have been seagate
Because it's the exact same product but cheaper. Probably comes from the same factory...
http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6819117374
http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6835200014
http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6813132118

All for a total of $721.74.

I than still need to get a wireless card and maybe a new case and cooling system.
So all up it'll be less than $1,000 which is incredible.

Most modern computer never pull more than 150-200 watts out of the wall. If you have a couple gpus you might peak out at 250 or 300 watts system total. Nearly all of that is 12v power, so you have to account for the amperage on the 12v rails, and then you want to give yourself about a 20% padding for drops in efficiency. If you have a single cpu, single GPU setup you are fine with 500 watts. If you have a couple gpu and an aggressive over clock, a good 500 watt is almost certainly still enough, but maybe get a 600 or 700 watt power supply just to be safe.

Just a note, a good 400 watt power supply is better than a bad 700 watt power supply. Quality matters. Seasonic and companies that rebadge seasonic units (like corsair) have been amongst the best from many of the reviews I have read over the years. Many name brands have some good models though. For a good run down, check for a johnnyguru review if you can find one. Johny is the best in the biz when it comes to dissecting power supply units.
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08-11-2014, 12:56 AM (This post was last modified: 08-11-2014 01:58 AM by EvolutionKills.)
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  
(13-10-2014 03:51 AM)Vosur Wrote:  Why do you think that? I have a 580W PSU and it's more than sufficient.
I was under the impression that 600W was not that much.
Ideally you want something around 750W. Where's Phaedrus when you need him? He was in-charge of the Cooler Master PSU department. He could probably get me a cheap PSU Angel

If I can get away with 600W that's cool though.

I have a Corsair HX850, which was going to be more than enough for a pair of power hungry GTX770's, but is overkill for a set of GTX970's.



(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  @EK, I haven't forgotten your posts. Just haven't had the money, but I'll have the money with my next pay check (or the one after) so I'm gonna design my PC now so I know exactly how much I need.

Wink



(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  
Quote:First up is picking a new mobo. I'm quite partial to ASUS, as I've used them for every machine I've built and they've yet to let me down. I like their UEFI BIOS and their reliability. I've also heard good things about ASRock, Gigabyte, MSI, and EVGA boards as well, but I've never used one myself. After that it's a choice between Intel and AMD. I'm not that familiar with the current AMD crop, as I do tend to stick with Intel for their better optimized core performance.

Yea mine is ASUS (I think, maybe ASRock??) and haven't had any problems with.
On my last PC I used AMD. I'm more familiar with AMD brand too. You tend to get more for your dollar with AMD compared to Intel. But I'm not like a hardcore AMD fan or anything, I'll go with either.

AMD generally has better bang-for-your-buck options, so long as you're looking for lower to mid range builds. Top end tends to be dominated by Intel and nVidia.



(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  
Quote:WHAT? A Pentium! Wait! Put down that tar and those feather and hear me out! The Haswell-E refresh (Devil's Canyon) included three separate CPU's. A new set of K-series unlocked SKU Core series chips (the i7 4790K @ 4GHz and the i5 4690K @ 3.5GHz that I currently have), and an unlocked '20th Anniversary' Pentium. This is that chip. It is a simple Pentium with a stock clock of 3.2GHz for two cores and no hyper-threading. That being said, many games still don't make heavy use of more than two cores, and this CPU is very overclock friendly. These things can easily reach the 4.5GHz+ range on air cooling, with very respectable performance for the super low price point. At higher clock speeds, this chip and easily swing with much more expensive CPU's in real-world game performance; and once this is no longer enough, you can easily upgrade to either a Haswell or Broadwell Core series CPU. Just make sure you get a upgraded CPU cooler to go with it.

yes, EK you beauty. This is what I need, cheap cheap processors that can be overclocked to preform like much more expensive CPU's.

OMFG IT'S ONLY $90!

I think I will go with that. It's cheap enough so that I can get it now and be justified in getting a better one, as you say either a Haswell or Boardwell core series, at a later date. I'm not really justified in updating a CPU if I spend like $250 on one.

It's a unique chip with unique potential.



(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  This is what I have so far:
Which I can't buy from Newegg because NZ sucks

Skip the $194 ASUS GTX750Ti, and take a look at the EVGA GTX750Ti for $168.

[Image: 02G-P4-3753-KR_XL_1.jpg]

Core Clock: ASUS 1072MHz vs EVGA 1176MHz
Boost Clock: ASUS 1150MHz vs EVGA 1255MHz
DirectX: ASUS DX11 vs EVGA DX11.2
Max Resolution: ASUS 2560 x 1600 (DL-DVI) vs EVGA 4096 x 2160
Card Dimensions: ASUS 8.58" x 4.53" vs EVGA 6.70" x 4.38"


Even with the 7% off code, the ASUS still comes in at $180.56, still more than $12 over the EVGA.

EVGA 02G-P4-3753-KR G-SYNC Support GeForce GTX 750 Ti Superclocked 2GB 128-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 Video Card - $168.26 @ Newegg NZ



(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...4H81E87031

Almost 700 ratings and averaging 4/5 eggs, and it's at least an 80 Plus certified, semi-modular, 500W PSU for under $60? Not bad!


(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  Because it's cheaper and all my harddrives, internal and external, have been seagate

I'm pretty sure that's the exact same Seagate Barracuda I recommended as well, but it sucks you have to pay a $20 markup for New Zealand...



(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  Because it's the exact same product but cheaper. Probably comes from the same factory...

Model F3-12800CL9D-8GBXL, the exact same ones I recommended again Muffs, good pick either way. Tongue


(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6819117374

Yeah, it's an awesome processor, you're welcome. Wink



(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6835200014

Big problem here Muffs, that CPU coller is built for Socket AM2, or 939 AMD Athlon 64 or Sempron processors. That simply wont't fit an Intel LGA1150 socket motherboard.

For $25, you can get a DEEP COOL GAMMAXX 200 2 copper pipe tower cooler, or for $29 you could get either a ARCTIC Freezer i11 triple copper pipe tower cooler or a ZALMAN CNPS5X Performa triple copper pipe tower cooler.


DEEPCOOL GAMMAXX 200 CPU Cooler 2 Heatpipes 92mm PWM Fan - $25.88 @ Newegg NZ
[Image: c0d158d056504d4f9a3665398762921f.jpg]

ARCTIC Freezer i11 CPU Cooler for Intel, 150W Cooling Capacity, 3 Direct Touch Heatpipes, <23dBA Fan Noise - $29.76 @ Newegg NZ
[Image: Arctic_Freezer_A11_01.jpg]


ZALMAN CNPS5X Performa 92mm FSB (Fluid Shield Bearing) Powerful Cooling Performance CPU Cooler - $29.76 @ Newegg NZ
[Image: ZALMAN_CNPS5X_Performa_01.jpg]

(While the Zalman looks nicer, it also looks like the Arctic comes with it's own tube of thermal-paste.)




(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  http://www.newegg.com/global/nz/Product/...6813132118

That, while not the board I recommended (the ASUS Z97-P), it is in fact the exact same one I am currently using (Z97-A). Good pick, and it does support both Crossfire and SLI, in addition to M.2 socket and SATA Express, and on-board fan controls from the UEFI BIOS (2 CPU fan sockets, 4 case fan sockets).

[Image: P_setting_fff_1_90_end_500.png]




(06-11-2014 01:04 AM)earmuffs Wrote:  All for a total of $721.74.

I than still need to get a wireless card and maybe a new case and cooling system.
So all up it'll be less than $1,000 which is incredible.

Well, you could get a separate card, or you could just get a motherboard with it integrated right up front. If you wanted the exact same ASUS board, but with Wifi AC built in?

ASUS Z97-PRO(Wi-Fi ac) LGA 1150 Intel Z97 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard - $271.81 @ Newegg NZ
[Image: P_setting_fff_1_90_end_500.png]


The cheapest full sized ATX board with Wifi AC is this MSI one, unfortunately it is Z87 chipset. While they can use Haswell-E refresh chips with a sufficiently updated BIOS, I don't know if they'll be able to support the upcoming Broadwell chips.

MSI Z87 MPOWER MAX AC LGA 1150 Intel Z87 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard - $258.86 @ Newegg NZ

However it does currently come with a free 8GB set of RAM worth almost $100, so you might consider it. Also, who makes the Hyper X Fury? Kingston, another solid name in RAM and they come with a lifetime warranty just like G.Skill and Corsair.

HyperX Fury Series 8GB 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model HX316C10F/8 - $95.77 @ Newegg NZ or FREE w/ the above motherboard!


How about a cheaper and smaller ASUS board with Wifi AC?

ASUS Z97I-PLUS LGA 1150 Intel Z97 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Mini ITX Intel Motherboard - $207.09 @ Newegg NZ
[Image: P_setting_fff_1_90_end_500.png]

Now this board is a Mini-ITX form factor, which means you can fit it into a smaller case. However it also sacrifices both PCI and DIMM slots to do so. That leaves you with just one PCI Express 3.0 slot for a GPU (so no Crossfire or SLI) and just two 240 pin DIMM slots for RAM (so if you get 2x4GB sticks, you'll be capped at 8GB unless you replace both sticks, you won't have extra slots to add to).



If you don't mind the limitations of a Mini-ITX, want Wifi AC , but don't want to spend more on a motherboard? Both GIGBYTE and MSI have Z97 Intel boards with built in Wifi for comparable prices as well.

GIGABYTE GA-Z97N-WIFI LGA 1150 Intel Z97 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Mini ITX Intel Motherboard - $178.61 @ Newegg NZ
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MSI Z97I AC LGA 1150 Intel Z97 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Mini ITX Intel Motherboard - $181.20 @ Newegg NZ
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Especially considering that a stand-alone Wfii PCI card will probably set you back an easy $50, getting one with it built in might not be a bad idea.

GIGABYTE Model GC-WB867D-I Bluetooth 4.0/WiFi Expansion Card - $42.70 @ Newegg NZ
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08-11-2014, 01:40 AM (This post was last modified: 08-11-2014 07:03 AM by EvolutionKills.)
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
(07-11-2014 07:47 PM)Michael_Tadlock Wrote:  Most modern computer never pull more than 150-200 watts out of the wall. If you have a couple gpus you might peak out at 250 or 300 watts system total. Nearly all of that is 12v power, so you have to account for the amperage on the 12v rails, and then you want to give yourself about a 20% padding for drops in efficiency. If you have a single cpu, single GPU setup you are fine with 500 watts. If you have a couple gpu and an aggressive over clock, a good 500 watt is almost certainly still enough, but maybe get a 600 or 700 watt power supply just to be safe.

Just a note, a good 400 watt power supply is better than a bad 700 watt power supply. Quality matters. Seasonic and companies that rebadge seasonic units (like corsair) have been amongst the best from many of the reviews I have read over the years. Many name brands have some good models though. For a good run down, check for a johnnyguru review if you can find one. Johny is the best in the biz when it comes to dissecting power supply units.

An i7 4690K, with a Corsair H110 liquid CPU cooler, 16GB of Corsair Dominator Platinum DDR3 @ 2400MHz, a Samsung 250GB SSD, a Seagate 1TB HDD, and an EVGA GTX780Ti (the former nVidia single-GPU flagship card) draws just shy of 480W, and that's before overclocking. A dual SLI of those card bumps consumption up to just shy of 730W (same with a single card dual-GPU Radeon R9 295X2 8GB), while a dual-GPU card like the Titan Z brings it just under 600W, and replacing it with a single GTX980 (the new nVidia single GPU flagship) drops consumption down to sub 390W, and a GTX970 drop consumption down further to below 370W.


The most recent generations of GPU's have been very power hungry, which is now one of the lead selling points for the cooler and more efficient GTX900 series. A quad TITAN SLI setup would have needed a 1200W~1500W PSU for an absolute cutting edge insane rig (think Large Pixel Collider).

Large Pixel Collider Setup (copying their build via pcpartpicker.com)
w/ dual nVidia TITAN Z (4 GPU's total) - 1092W
w/ dual AMD R9 295X2 (4 GPU's total) - 1342W
w/ quad nVidia GTX780Ti - 1342W
w/ quad nVidia TITAN BLACK - 1342W
w/ quad AMD R9 290X - 1542W
w/ quad nVidia GTX980 - 1002W

Also remember that these are with Intel CPU's, as the current crop of high-end AMD chips are heat spewing energy hogs, much like their high-end GPU cards. The i7 4690K (4.4GHz, 4 core) enthusiast CPU is rated for 88W, while the i7 4690X (3.6GHz, 6 core) from the Large Pixel Collider is rated at 130W. The AMD FX9590 is a 4.7GHz, 8 core processor that requires at least 220W by itself, and it's still only a $300 enthusiast grade CPU like the i7 4690K (the 88W one, slightly more than 1/3 the power usage).

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08-11-2014, 04:52 AM
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
Of course having more than two GPUs is unlikely to make an improvement to gameplay:




The GTX 900 series does look like a significant advance;



Give me your argument in the form of a published paper, and then we can start to talk.
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08-11-2014, 05:19 AM
RE: Finally building a new gaming rig!
(08-11-2014 04:52 AM)Hafnof Wrote:  Of course having more than two GPUs is unlikely to make an improvement to gameplay:




The GTX 900 series does look like a significant advance;



Yep, seen those already. I do enjoy Linus. Thumbsup

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