Genetic Code
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31-03-2017, 05:13 PM
Genetic Code
Maybe this is a really dumb, perhaps meaningless, question given my biology knowledge is subzero. So, which part of the body is the genetic code stored in? When an organ or something else is transplanted into a host, it must at some point acquire information about how to replenish its cells from the host - I am assuming. Which part of the host does the genetic information for these cells come from?

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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31-03-2017, 05:18 PM
RE: Genetic Code
(31-03-2017 05:13 PM)tomilay Wrote:  Maybe this is a really dumb, perhaps meaningless, question given my biology knowledge is subzero. So, which part of the body is the genetic code stored in? When an organ or something else is transplanted into a host, it must at some point acquire information about how to replenish its cells from the host - I am assuming. Which part of the host does the genetic information for these cells come from?
No, I would have thought that it retains it's own genetic footprint, each cell division would be "ancestors" of the donor cells.

DNA is in every cell.
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31-03-2017, 05:29 PM
RE: Genetic Code
(31-03-2017 05:18 PM)Stevil Wrote:  
(31-03-2017 05:13 PM)tomilay Wrote:  Maybe this is a really dumb, perhaps meaningless, question given my biology knowledge is subzero. So, which part of the body is the genetic code stored in? When an organ or something else is transplanted into a host, it must at some point acquire information about how to replenish its cells from the host - I am assuming. Which part of the host does the genetic information for these cells come from?
No, I would have thought that it retains it's own genetic footprint, each cell division would be "ancestors" of the donor cells.

DNA is in every cell.

I see. Interesting. So every cell handles its genetic side of the business. Does that mean that a DNA test of the transplanted part, e.g, a testicle, to pick a perfectly random example, returns genetic information of only the donor?

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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31-03-2017, 06:00 PM (This post was last modified: 31-03-2017 06:08 PM by SYZ.)
RE: Genetic Code
(31-03-2017 05:29 PM)tomilay Wrote:  So every cell handles its genetic side of the business. Does that mean that a DNA test of the transplanted part, e.g, a testicle, to pick a perfectly random example, returns genetic information of only the donor?

Nope. Blood stream and lymphatic system will transfer DNA. Donor DNA has often been isolated in the recipients of certain vascular organ transplants. Think too of the DNA in white blood cells introduced into the patient's blood stream after a transfusion.

BTW, as far as I know, testes transplants are really still in the future. There's been a few attempts, but tissue rejection has been a major issue. It's certainly not a regular type of transplantation, and normally a synthetic prosthesis is used—assuming the remaining testis is still functional.

I'm a creationist... I believe that man created God.
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31-03-2017, 06:53 PM
RE: Genetic Code
(31-03-2017 06:00 PM)SYZ Wrote:  
(31-03-2017 05:29 PM)tomilay Wrote:  So every cell handles its genetic side of the business. Does that mean that a DNA test of the transplanted part, e.g, a testicle, to pick a perfectly random example, returns genetic information of only the donor?

Nope. Blood stream and lymphatic system will transfer DNA. Donor DNA has often been isolated in the recipients of certain vascular organ transplants. Think too of the DNA in white blood cells introduced into the patient's blood stream after a transfusion.

BTW, as far as I know, testes transplants are really still in the future. There's been a few attempts, but tissue rejection has been a major issue. It's certainly not a regular type of transplantation, and normally a synthetic prosthesis is used—assuming the remaining testis is still functional.

So by transferring DNA, does that then make the donated organ have the host's DNA? Is the lymphatic system like some sort of DNA central casting?

We have to remember that what we observe is not nature herself, but nature exposed to our method of questioning ~ Werner Heisenberg
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01-04-2017, 03:55 AM
RE: Genetic Code
(31-03-2017 06:00 PM)SYZ Wrote:  Nope. Blood stream and lymphatic system will transfer DNA. Donor DNA has often been isolated in the recipients of certain vascular organ transplants. Think too of the DNA in white blood cells introduced into the patient's blood stream after a transfusion.

BTW, as far as I know, testes transplants are really still in the future. There's been a few attempts, but tissue rejection has been a major issue. It's certainly not a regular type of transplantation, and normally a synthetic prosthesis is used—assuming the remaining testis is still functional.
Blood cells (white blood cells) do not create heart cells. Only heart cells create heart cells, so this means a donor heart will continue to regenerate new heart cells of the donor's DNA. It does not become a heart of the host and hence they continue to take anti rejection drugs for the rest of their life.

Why would you accept donor testis? You would then be producing babies that don't have your own DNA i.e. not related to you.
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