Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
Post Reply
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
26-12-2013, 09:18 AM
Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
I've been a gamer my whole life. I know what makes a good game.

My dream as a kid and well into my early 20s was to "make" video games. At first, I wanted to do the actual programming of the game, but then I found out how tech smart you have to be and I don't have that gift. I'm savvy but not enough to make games.

Later on, I realized my propensity for writing and story creation, so I wanted to do that for video games. In that, I have a zillion good ideas rolling around in my head.

One in particular... a recent creation... and dang good, if I say so myself.

But, it's stuck in my head... bound to my thoughts and will fade into nothingness.

How does one go about getting someone in the game industry to actually listen to your game idea? I can't "make" a game because I suck at programming and coding... and when I say "suck", I mean those NASA chimps can out-program me.

[Image: dog-shaking.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-12-2013, 09:22 AM
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
You can't. Get ahold of someone who programs games for fun. When I say fun, I mean someone who isn't working in the game industry. How come?

Work conditions for game programmers are hell. You might get listened to, but the outcome most likely won't be what you were expecting.

If you get a person who programs games for fun, and you get a mock-up, then you bring it to the games industry and either get told it's something they want or it isn't.

Pretty cut and dry, but that's how it works.

[Image: 3d366d5c-72a0-4228-b835-f404c2970188_zps...1381867723]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-12-2013, 10:38 AM
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
(26-12-2013 09:18 AM)kingschosen Wrote:  ...
How does one go about getting someone in the game industry to actually listen to your game idea?
...

Prayer?

Drinking Beverage

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 4 users Like DLJ's post
26-12-2013, 11:39 AM
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
(26-12-2013 09:18 AM)kingschosen Wrote:  I've been a gamer my whole life. I know what makes a good game.

My dream as a kid and well into my early 20s was to "make" video games. At first, I wanted to do the actual programming of the game, but then I found out how tech smart you have to be and I don't have that gift. I'm savvy but not enough to make games.

Later on, I realized my propensity for writing and story creation, so I wanted to do that for video games. In that, I have a zillion good ideas rolling around in my head.

One in particular... a recent creation... and dang good, if I say so myself.

But, it's stuck in my head... bound to my thoughts and will fade into nothingness.

How does one go about getting someone in the game industry to actually listen to your game idea? I can't "make" a game because I suck at programming and coding... and when I say "suck", I mean those NASA chimps can out-program me.

Buy RPG Maker ACE or download a cracked version; it might still be off 50 % at Steam. Otherwise, forget it. Not even Valve would listen you, or anyone else outside of their own HQ. The world as a game designer isn't as easy as it sounds.




Still, snackbars...



[Image: 9f6.gif]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes ELK12695's post
26-12-2013, 12:41 PM
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
ELK,
That was AWESOME!

I want to work there.

I'm not into games and I don't eat snacks but all those fellow Aspie colleagues... heaven.

Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
26-12-2013, 05:53 PM (This post was last modified: 26-12-2013 08:32 PM by grizzlysnake.)
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
Are you sure your ideas can be expressed in a video game? Game stories are very little like any other medium because games are more interactive and stroy is usually expressed through the actions of the player. It's all about how to apply your ideas within the medium, show don't tell, that kinda thing. Have you thought what type of game genre you can express your story in? Fighting, fps, rpg, adventure?
I'd recommend watching some ExtraCredits
Really great stuff covers lots on the game industry the games we love. They are a bit theoretical and idealistic but I love them anywaysTongue

"I don't have to have faith, I have experience." Joseph Campbell
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
29-12-2013, 08:46 PM
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
The best thing to do would be to gather an indie team, big CORPS. couldn't risk you giving the idea, making the game, getting rich off of it and then you suing them since it was your idea.

Bury me with my guns on, so when I reach the other side - I can show him what it feels like to die.
Bury me with my guns on, so when I'm cast out of the sky, I can shoot the devil right between the eyes.
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 1 user Likes Question's post
29-12-2013, 08:52 PM
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
(26-12-2013 09:18 AM)kingschosen Wrote:  I've been a gamer my whole life. I know what makes a good game.

My dream as a kid and well into my early 20s was to "make" video games. At first, I wanted to do the actual programming of the game, but then I found out how tech smart you have to be and I don't have that gift. I'm savvy but not enough to make games.

Later on, I realized my propensity for writing and story creation, so I wanted to do that for video games. In that, I have a zillion good ideas rolling around in my head.

One in particular... a recent creation... and dang good, if I say so myself.

But, it's stuck in my head... bound to my thoughts and will fade into nothingness.

How does one go about getting someone in the game industry to actually listen to your game idea? I can't "make" a game because I suck at programming and coding... and when I say "suck", I mean those NASA chimps can out-program me.

KC, ask cufflink. He should have some ideas for you.

Insufferable know-it-all.Einstein
Those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music - Friedrich Nietzsche
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
31-12-2013, 07:29 PM
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
(29-12-2013 08:46 PM)Question Wrote:  The best thing to do would be to gather an indie team, big CORPS. couldn't risk you giving the idea, making the game, getting rich off of it and then you suing them since it was your idea.

That's the same reason companies don't welcome scripts for movies or TV shows, song ideas, books, or other things. Unless you have a contract with them for such things, they'd be afraid of lawsuits. Let's say someone pitches an idea for a game involving a monkey protagonist fighting zookeepers, a company flat-out rejects it, and then makes a game where the only similarities are that there's also a monkey as a protagonist who fights something. The guy who pitched the first idea might cling onto that little similarity and sue for millions. Companies don't like taking that kind of risk.

One way to get your idea made is to actually get into the game development industry professionally or as a hobby. If you can find work at a small business or indie team, they might be willing to do something with your idea. If not, then you can find others with relevant skills (professionals or hobbyists) willing to take part in your project, either as contract workers or partners to create your own indie team, and look for funding on Kickstarter. That's the route a lot of indie developers have gone recently.

If something can be destroyed by the truth, it might be worth destroying.

[Image: ZcC2kGl.png]
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
02-01-2014, 09:57 AM
RE: Getting someone to listen to your game ideas.
(26-12-2013 09:18 AM)kingschosen Wrote:  I've been a gamer my whole life. I know what makes a good game.

My dream as a kid and well into my early 20s was to "make" video games. At first, I wanted to do the actual programming of the game, but then I found out how tech smart you have to be and I don't have that gift. I'm savvy but not enough to make games.

Later on, I realized my propensity for writing and story creation, so I wanted to do that for video games. In that, I have a zillion good ideas rolling around in my head.

One in particular... a recent creation... and dang good, if I say so myself.

But, it's stuck in my head... bound to my thoughts and will fade into nothingness.

How does one go about getting someone in the game industry to actually listen to your game idea? I can't "make" a game because I suck at programming and coding... and when I say "suck", I mean those NASA chimps can out-program me.


You cannot just sell or give your potentially "great ideas" to anyone making games. I would suggest you go to school to make games and form up a team with people there and start out indie. I'm not saying this by pulling it out of my ass, either.

Because this is exactly what I did.

I got back from a year overseas, flush with new support, and went back to school to FINALLY pursue my dream of making video games. My primary goal was to meet other like-minded people and form a team, largely because I have difficulty moving from Minnesota (my kid is here), and because I did not want to be some texture monkey working the ground floor and not utilizing my ideas. And I have a lot of ideas. My Game Design Docs folder features over two dozen ideas in various forms of conceptualization.

I am not a programmer, by the way, and unfortunately, my school was not good at creating programmers (so be careful there). On the upside, I have an almost uncanny understanding of what does and does not work in game design.

Currently, my team is called From Nothing Game Studios. We formed officially in February 2012 and released our first game to Android devices in October 2012. We were smart and we kept the game small and focused--it's a twist on match-3 puzzle games. We have an official website (see my signature--but it hasn't been updated in a while), a tax ID, and a released game. Two of us worked as testers at Activision (one of them being me).

Earlier in 2013, I stumbled upon an interview with Dan Adelman from Nintendo where he talked about how Nintendo had dropped several barriers to indie devs in order to release games on their platforms. So, realizing I really had nothing to lose, I sent in an application. To my utter, brick-shitting amazement, a month later I received an email that we were now an "approved Wii U™ developer."

I scrounged the money for the dev kit, and bought one. Nintendo had a deal--they may still be doing it, actually--where when you buy the dev kit, you get the Unity license for Wii U for free. The free copies of Unity we got have now paid off the dev kit. We have now stalled development of our second game to port our old Android title to the Wii U. We are changing and adding enough elements of and to it that it is now considered a Wii U exclusive.

Our little puzzle game, GravBlocks, is now going to be GravBlocks+ and we are hoping to submit it to Nintendo very soon to get ourselves out there. Android is great to get a "proof of concept" done, but a shitty place to go if you want to make money. You'll be lost in a sea of 700,000 other apps and games, and if you charge any money at all, it's just going to be worse.

A few weeks ago, I realized I was missing a few steps in our submission to Nintendo--and started the necessary paperwork. I am thrilled to say that Nintendo has approved our game concept for release. So, EEEEEEEEEEEEEE!! is basically how I feel.

I am the director of the project and the original concept designer. I programmed nothing. I have done graphics, website and Facebook updates, concept outlining, built all 100 puzzles in the current Android version, and pretty much anything else that wasn't "programming" or "audio."


The "TL-DR" version of this post is thus: Forget trying to get your idea made. Go make your idea. Your proof of concept is when you prove your concept.

But also, follow us on Facebook. We have announcements coming soon, and also, much of what you read here is the first I've mentioned publicly.

This is the signature.

http://www.FromNothingGameStudios.com
Find all posts by this user
Like Post Quote this message in a reply
[+] 3 users Like Skeptic Gamer's post
Post Reply
Forum Jump: