Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books?
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24-01-2014, 10:24 PM
Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books?
Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books on physical anthropology, primatology or simply on primates, paleoanthropology, human origins, etc...?

Popular lit, or otherwise?

...
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25-01-2014, 04:25 PM (This post was last modified: 25-01-2014 04:36 PM by ghostexorcist.)
RE: Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books?
(24-01-2014 10:24 PM)Raptor Jesus Wrote:  Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books on physical anthropology, primatology or simply on primates, paleoanthropology, human origins, etc...?

Popular lit, or otherwise?

That is a tough question. As I explained in a previous thread to our newer member ThePaleolithicFreethinker, I actually know more about living primates, primarily chimps and bonobos, than fossils. What I do know about fossils comes from my university lectures and access to fossil replicas in class labs. I hope to rectify this gap in my knowledge in grad school by researching fossils firsthand. As far as primatology is concerned, anything by Frans De Wall is a must:

* Chimpanzee Politics (I have a PDF of this if you are interested)
* Bonobo: The Forgotten Ape
* Peacemaking Among Primates
* The Ape and the Sushi Master

There are several books written on the different Chimp communities across Africa. I have almost all of them, but I've only read the following.

* Chimpanzees of the Lakeshore: Natural History and Culture at Mahale
* The Chimpanzees of Gombe: Patterns of Behavior (I've actually only read bits and pieces of this one since its huge)

For ape language studies:

* Next of Kin: My Conversations with Chimpanzees

For ape culture:

* The Cultured Chimpanzee: Reflections on Cultural Primatology (I also have a PDF for this)

The best book on human origins that I've personally read is:

* Before the Dawn: Recovering the Lost History of Our Ancestors (I also have a PDF of this)

I personally think more people would accept evolution if they would read up on our ape cousins. Reading about them has helped me understand why humans act the way we do. For instance, have you ever noticed how some little kids like to rough house with adults? Some get really rowdy and punch and kick just a little bit too much. Well, juvenile chimps do this to test the social boundaries of their environment--i.e., they learn their place in the hierarchy.
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25-01-2014, 04:27 PM
RE: Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books?
Keep in mind that I recently downloaded many different books on the subjects you listed. Check out this thread for titles.

http://www.thethinkingatheist.com/forum/...-book-PDFs

If you like any of them I can email you PDFs and EPUBs.
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25-01-2014, 04:54 PM
RE: Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books?
(25-01-2014 04:25 PM)ghostexorcist Wrote:  ...
I personally think more people would accept evolution if they would read up on our ape cousins. Reading about them has helped me understand why humans act the way we do. ...

It really is amazing how like other animals we really, really are! I agree, a lot of people just don't know or understand. Even beyond Chimps, Bonobos, or other primates. Even looking at mating habits and reproductive strategies of birds, or problem solving strategies of dogs vrs wolves, etc... We are amazingly well connected to other species, far more so than others realize.

It really is amazing, I agree with you on that. I see you study more on the "other" primates side. My education was more related to the human origin side. Of course you can not study human origins without studying all primates to a greater or lesser degree, but a lot of that study was more to focus on the transition of species through the hominins. So a strong focus on both the physical evolution of humans, and the cultural and technological evolution of humans into the modern day.

It seems like we have over lap, but you extend more one way, and I extend more the other maybe?

One effect it has had for me is I have a tendency to view almost all of human behavior through the filter of hunters and gatherers. It's like taking a partially domesticated wild wolf (aka, a dog) and having it live inside an apartment all day. Every issue or odd behavior that apartment dog may have can be traced back to the fact that they have a nature evolved from a wolves origins, and are best evolved for living in a small community of people and other dogs, out in the wild, hunting and roaming and living around a camp fire. Not stuck in a small apartment with occasional walks. It's why some times our dogs do crazy stuff, but can be fine too, and also why we humans sometimes do crazy stuff, and can be fine to. We haven't yet caught our physiological evolution up with our cultural and technological evolution.

We are like partially domesticated apes, living in small apartments, when we are evolved from our other ape origins, are best evolved for living in small communities, roaming out in the wild living around camp fires.

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26-01-2014, 05:57 PM
RE: Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books?
(25-01-2014 04:54 PM)Raptor Jesus Wrote:  It really is amazing how like other animals we really, really are! I agree, a lot of people just don't know or understand. Even beyond Chimps, Bonobos, or other primates. Even looking at mating habits and reproductive strategies of birds, or problem solving strategies of dogs vrs wolves, etc... We are amazingly well connected to other species, far more so than others realize.

It really is amazing, I agree with you on that. I see you study more on the "other" primates side. My education was more related to the human origin side. Of course you can not study human origins without studying all primates to a greater or lesser degree, but a lot of that study was more to focus on the transition of species through the hominins. So a strong focus on both the physical evolution of humans, and the cultural and technological evolution of humans into the modern day.

It seems like we have over lap, but you extend more one way, and I extend more the other maybe?

One effect it has had for me is I have a tendency to view almost all of human behavior through the filter of hunters and gatherers. It's like taking a partially domesticated wild wolf (aka, a dog) and having it live inside an apartment all day. Every issue or odd behavior that apartment dog may have can be traced back to the fact that they have a nature evolved from a wolves origins, and are best evolved for living in a small community of people and other dogs, out in the wild, hunting and roaming and living around a camp fire. Not stuck in a small apartment with occasional walks. It's why some times our dogs do crazy stuff, but can be fine too, and also why we humans sometimes do crazy stuff, and can be fine to. We haven't yet caught our physiological evolution up with our cultural and technological evolution.

We are like partially domesticated apes, living in small apartments, when we are evolved from our other ape origins, are best evolved for living in small communities, roaming out in the wild living around camp fires.

Our starting point is different, but I think our end point is the same. I use apes as a way of understanding the origin of behavioral traits; my main point being that if chimps, bonobos, and humans all exhibit the behavior, it was most likely passed on by the last common ancestor.

I use hunter-gatherers when discussing, for example, diet (i.e. our modern obsession with salty, sugary, and fattening food), religion, morality, and war as it pertains to early martial arts. Using them as a filter is sound in my opinion considering that we lived the first 190,000 years or so of our existence in that capacity. A good book on a modern group is The !Kung San: Men, Women and Work in a Foraging Society.
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27-01-2014, 11:31 AM (This post was last modified: 27-01-2014 11:34 AM by ghostexorcist.)
RE: Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books?
I should point out that, although my knowledge of fossils is not as expansive as living apes, I have read several books on the subject. The biggest and best of those is The Primate Fossil Record. It is a bit technical, but it has pictures of fossils and ecological summaries for every primate fossil discovered up to 2002. Another good one that I've read, but only recently purchased, is Human Origins: The Fossil Record. It has line drawings for all of the major fossils. The Hunt for the Dawn Monkey is a good one for info on the earliest anthropoids.
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07-02-2014, 05:31 PM (This post was last modified: 07-02-2014 05:35 PM by Drunkin Druid.)
RE: Ghostexorcist, what are your favorite books?
I am legend was a fun read! I don't know what my favourites are there are so many. I started a thread called The warhound and the worlds pain. That one defiantly goes without saying!
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