Grieving as an atheist
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28-07-2015, 11:03 PM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
(28-07-2015 10:06 PM)Mrs.B Wrote:  
(28-07-2015 09:51 PM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  ((((MrsB))))

Thank you. We have great memories.

No doubt you do, ma'am. May they live on. Smile
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30-07-2015, 08:33 AM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
I am so sorry to hear of your loss.

To what you said, I haven't had the personal experience with death, but I have seen it with other health-related issues. I have always wondered why it is that the ones who profess such devote belief in an afterlife seem to grieve the most of those that leave before us.

I experienced a death during my religious time that left a major impact and emotional scare on my life. It is the catalyst that eventually led to me leaving the faith. My grandfather died when I was sixteen. He had rejected god & I was rigged with years of extreme guilt and depression that I was responsible for the eternal damnation of his soul. No child should be made to feel that way.

Now that I have reject the myth of god, I feel so much more peace in my life. My father-in-law had a stroke 2 years ago. I watched as my more religious sister-in-law had a much harder time dealing with the situation than my universalist sister-in-law, and my atheist husband. Now, it could be different personalities involved as well, but I have noticed this tend.

Daeuse
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30-07-2015, 09:36 AM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
Sorry for your loss. I do know the feeling having lost a parent -- and more than a few friends - many of them on motorcycles as well.

And while I personally know the terror of it -- at least it's usually quick -- and best - it's doing something you love.

Most people don't get that lucky.

.......................................

The difference between prayer and masturbation - is when a guy is through masturbating - he has something to show for his efforts.
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30-07-2015, 09:44 AM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
I'm very sorry for you loss.

Both of my brothers have died in the past 7 months. The more religious people in my family seem to have a harder time in dealing with it as they seem to find it out of the scope of the plan that their invisible friend has.

" Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous."
David Hume
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30-07-2015, 10:31 AM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
I'm sorry you're going through this. It's a difficult time for you.

One of the problems I've encountered with theists is that when there's a death in the family they're confronted with something that, down deep, they realize is natural. All animals die and most plants die. Theists have to make their religion work overtime and try to ignore nature.

When my father died eight years ago we didn't have a church service, he was an atheist. We all got together on my brothers back porch, broke out the beers and told fun and interesting stories about my dad and the life he lived. It went on for hours. There was more drinking and more funny stories. We were in hysterics. Finally late into the night, after 7 or 8 hours of partying, we took his ashes and scattered it in the Columbia river. It was outstanding.

This Aaran Freemen piece is something that you might find comforting. Sometimes people need poetic prose when faced with a loss. I think that's what reading passages from the Bible at funerals is all about. More so than a fictional god.



You Want a Physicist To Speak at Your Funeral


You want a physicist to speak at your funeral. You want the physicist to talk to your grieving family about the conservation of energy, so they will understand that your energy has not died. You want the physicist to remind your sobbing mother about the first law of thermodynamics; that no energy gets created in the universe, and none is destroyed. You want your mother to know that all your energy, every vibration, every Btu of heat, every wave of every particle that was her beloved child remains with her in this world. You want the physicist to tell your weeping father that amid energies of the cosmos, you gave as good as you got.

And at one point you'd hope that the physicist would step down from the pulpit and walk to your brokenhearted spouse there in the pew and tell him that all the photons that ever bounced off your face, all the particles whose paths were interrupted by your smile, by the touch of your hair, hundreds of trillions of particles, have raced off like children, their ways forever changed by you. And as your widow rocks in the arms of a loving family, may the physicist let her know that all the photons that bounced from you were gathered in the particle detectors that are her eyes, that those photons created within her constellations of electromagnetically charged neurons whose energy will go on forever.

And the physicist will remind the congregation of how much of all our energy is given off as heat. There may be a few fanning themselves with their programs as he says it. And he will tell them that the warmth that flowed through you in life is still here, still part of all that we are, even as we who mourn continue the heat of our own lives.

And you'll want the physicist to explain to those who loved you that they need not have faith; indeed, they should not have faith. Let them know that they can measure, that scientists have measured precisely the conservation of energy and found it accurate, verifiable and consistent across space and time. You can hope your family will examine the evidence and satisfy themselves that the science is sound and that they'll be comforted to know your energy's still around. According to the law of the conservation of energy, not a bit of you is gone; you're just less orderly. Amen.

-Aaron Freeman.

Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors.... on Donald J. Trump:

He is deformed, crooked, old, and sere,
Ill-fac’d, worse bodied, shapeless every where;
Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind,
Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.
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30-07-2015, 11:37 AM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
(30-07-2015 09:44 AM)KidCharlemagne1962 Wrote:  I'm very sorry for you loss.

Both of my brothers have died in the past 7 months. The more religious people in my family seem to have a harder time in dealing with it as they seem to find it out of the scope of the plan that their invisible friend has.

And condolences to you too, KC.
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30-07-2015, 01:48 PM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
(28-07-2015 09:30 PM)itsnotmeitsyou Wrote:  Has anyone else experienced this? I find it strangely comforting to know that there is no plan. His death was not at the whim of some cosmic puppet master, but a random occurrence in an unconcerned universe.

2 years later and I've still got clinical depression from my younger brother just dropping dead. At least with an accident or disease there is some cause it can be traced to. I asked my Doc "What is this sudden cardiac arrest and are there tests we can run to see if I'm at risk." "It means we have no explanation for it. Electrical system just went out." It kinda freaked me out.

#sigh
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30-07-2015, 04:21 PM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
(30-07-2015 09:44 AM)KidCharlemagne1962 Wrote:  I'm very sorry for you loss.

Both of my brothers have died in the past 7 months. The more religious people in my family seem to have a harder time in dealing with it as they seem to find it out of the scope of the plan that their invisible friend has.

I am very sorry to hear that KidC.

See here they are the bruises some were self-inflicted and some showed up along the way. - JF

We're all mad here. The Cheshire Cat
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31-07-2015, 12:21 PM
Grieving as an atheist
I'm truly sorry for your loss. I wish you the best. Do good buddy

"If you cannot explain it simply, you don't understand it enough" -Albert Einstein
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31-07-2015, 10:09 PM
RE: Grieving as an atheist
Quite the thread!

KC, shit sorry mate. GirlyMan? Bloody hell.

Sadly I have no "wise word" to comfort anyone. All I can do really is say how sorry I am that people have to go through this. And we all do. No wonder there are so many rituals developed to help poor old humanity overcome it.

I am saddened to learn of all the losses here on this thread. Sad

NOTE: Member, Tomasia uses this site to slander other individuals. He then later proclaims it a joke, but not in public.
I will call him a liar and a dog here and now.
Banjo.
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