Hiking and Backpacking Thread
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02-12-2015, 07:47 AM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
I know the cold weather rations (the main course of which is freeze dried) are way better than the notorious ready to eat meals. They actually taste like food. It's just that preparation can be a pain in the ass if you're constantly on the move.

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02-12-2015, 08:47 AM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
I like this guy's videos:




"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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02-12-2015, 11:30 AM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
I almost always over pack on food, like a hobbit going off on an adventure. I love to cook over the fire while camping. Therefore, I pack food options based on that. While not necessarily the most convenient in terms of preparation or optimal in calorie density to reduce weight, I don't ignore those aspects entirely. I'll go to great effort to reduce weight in all my other gear just so I can carry extra food. Plus, I almost always hike/camp in areas where there are plenty of water sources so I do not have to carry much water.

So...
I always bring 1 very small (about 1-1/2") whole onion and one small clove of garlic per night of my trip, some olive oil and season salt. I also sometimes bring summer sausage (about 1" in diameter) but that is optional. I pack several small whole onions versus one larger one because, trust me, you do not want to try to repack a cut onion. I also pack pita bread (one per day) because I love bread and it packs pretty well.

Every evening meal starts with this: I cut up the onion and garlic (and little bit of the sausage if I have it) and brown them in the bottom of my pot with just the tiniest amount of olive oil. Just as they start to brown and stick to the bottom of the pot add cold water to deglaze.

Then, I add one of an assortment of pasta mixes and simmer until the pasta is tender and enjoy with half a pita:
Zatarain's Red Beans & Rice is my absolute favorite (and I think it is vegan!) - half a pack is plenty, pre-split at home into little paper baggies to make it easier
Lipton pasta sides (probably not vegan) - half a pack is plenty
Ramen noodles (Top Ramen Oriental flavor is a vegan option)

Breakfast is either instant grits or a clif bar (oatmeal raisin or banana nut bread) warmed up/toasted in my pot over the fire with coffee or hot chocolate.

I munch on trailmix and dried fruit all day. I might have half a pita with some peanut butter and honey or some hard cheese. I also pack a couple of GU gels per day. I don't always use them unless it is really cold or I am covering rougher terrain or otherwise burning calories at a higher rate than usual. Like yakherder mentioned, these are also good for keeping in the hammock at night (just make sure to get the caffeine-free ones.) A friend of mine likes to bring peanut brittle, which sounds awesome, but is a pain to make.

Cooking the evening meal over the fire (or stove, if a fire is impractical due to location or rain) is one of the best parts of the experience for me. I love to eat and I'd probably be miserable if I had to ration my food. The onions are maybe a bit of a luxury, but for a short 2-3 night trip, it is way worth it. If I were going for longer, I'd just do instant rice/ramen/beans for some of the nights. The only time I would worry about having have a lot of variety and going the freeze-dried route would be if I were going for more than a week. In that case, I would get tired of my normal stuff I am sure. Also, if I were going somewhere that required me to pack in a lot of water and conserve, I'd have to rethink my entire setup because it is heavier and uses more water in the cooking process than freeze-dried.

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02-12-2015, 11:42 AM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
(02-12-2015 11:30 AM)TurkeyBurner Wrote:  I almost always over pack on food, like a hobbit going off on an adventure. I love to cook over the fire while camping. Therefore, I pack food options based on that. While not necessarily the most convenient in terms of preparation or optimal in calorie density to reduce weight, I don't ignore those aspects entirely. I'll go to great effort to reduce weight in all my other gear just so I can carry extra food. Plus, I almost always hike/camp in areas where there are plenty of water sources so I do not have to carry much water.

So...
I always bring 1 very small (about 1-1/2") whole onion and one small clove of garlic per night of my trip, some olive oil and season salt. I also sometimes bring summer sausage (about 1" in diameter) but that is optional. I pack several small whole onions versus one larger one because, trust me, you do not want to try to repack a cut onion. I also pack pita bread (one per day) because I love bread and it packs pretty well.

Every evening meal starts with this: I cut up the onion and garlic (and little bit of the sausage if I have it) and brown them in the bottom of my pot with just the tiniest amount of olive oil. Just as they start to brown and stick to the bottom of the pot add cold water to deglaze.

Then, I add one of an assortment of pasta mixes and simmer until the pasta is tender and enjoy with half a pita:
Zatarain's Red Beans & Rice is my absolute favorite (and I think it is vegan!) - half a pack is plenty, pre-split at home into little paper baggies to make it easier
Lipton pasta sides (probably not vegan) - half a pack is plenty
Ramen noodles (Top Ramen Oriental flavor is a vegan option)

Breakfast is either instant grits or a clif bar (oatmeal raisin or banana nut bread) warmed up/toasted in my pot over the fire with coffee or hot chocolate.

I munch on trailmix and dried fruit all day. I might have half a pita with some peanut butter and honey or some hard cheese. I also pack a couple of GU gels per day. I don't always use them unless it is really cold or I am covering rougher terrain or otherwise burning calories at a higher rate than usual. Like yakherder mentioned, these are also good for keeping in the hammock at night (just make sure to get the caffeine-free ones.) A friend of mine likes to bring peanut brittle, which sounds awesome, but is a pain to make.

Cooking the evening meal over the fire (or stove, if a fire is impractical due to location or rain) is one of the best parts of the experience for me. I love to eat and I'd probably be miserable if I had to ration my food. The onions are maybe a bit of a luxury, but for a short 2-3 night trip, it is way worth it. If I were going for longer, I'd just do instant rice/ramen/beans for some of the nights. The only time I would worry about having have a lot of variety and going the freeze-dried route would be if I were going for more than a week. In that case, I would get tired of my normal stuff I am sure. Also, if I were going somewhere that required me to pack in a lot of water and conserve, I'd have to rethink my entire setup because it is heavier and uses more water in the cooking process than freeze-dried.

I love food too. I get cranky when I'm hungry Hobo That's why I was kind of dreading the freeze dried foods I was thinking of taking for longer backpacking trips because they kind of looked meh. Although, food always tastes better outdoors on a hike for some reason.

The vegan prepacks I've been taking have hummus, pita, lentil spread, crackers, nuts, chocolate (vegan), cookies (vegan), rice krisps. But obviously (besides cookies and choco) those aren't exactly high calorie foods. So I really wanted to find some good eats for longer backpacking excursions.

I forgot to mention in my other post, I also bring Rise bars. They are vegan--but I'm pretty sure they also have non-vegan flavors. The reason I like them is that they have all natural ingredients and not a lot of sugar (like you find in typical protein bars). They have 15 grams of protein per bar.

You sound like you really do it up food-wise when u go backpacking/camping. I need to find someone who can cook like that to go backpacking with since I suck at cooking. I do make a mean pb and j though Hobo

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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02-12-2015, 12:32 PM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
(02-12-2015 08:47 AM)jennybee Wrote:  I like this guy's videos:




He's spot on. And I'm definitely one of those "food as fuel" people he described Smile I don't worry about balancing meals too much, though. Micronutrient deficiency takes a long time to happen for most nutrients. I'd definitely consider it a concern in an "Oh shit I'm lost in the mountains" scenario, but not for a day or even a week or two of backpacking. For short duration excursions, I'm only worried about energy and keeping my protein intake high enough that my body doesn't cannibalize muscle tissue to get that energy. Plus, the multi-vitamin powder I put in my milk powder/whey mix helps offset that anyway and is a lot more convenient than trying to carry around 20 different food items in my pack.

I might get more creative if I were doing it for leisure, but usually I've already got at least 50 pounds of equipment for whatever we're doing even before I get to the food. So beyond that, simplicity is gold. I'm all about just dropping a spoon and a jar of peanut butter into my side pack so all I have to do for a snack is open it up and grab a spoonful of pure energy. Don't even have to stop walking.

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02-12-2015, 12:58 PM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
(02-12-2015 12:32 PM)yakherder Wrote:  
(02-12-2015 08:47 AM)jennybee Wrote:  I like this guy's videos:




He's spot on. And I'm definitely one of those "food as fuel" people he described Smile I don't worry about balancing meals too much, though. Micronutrient deficiency takes a long time to happen for most nutrients. I'd definitely consider it a concern in an "Oh shit I'm lost in the mountains" scenario, but not for a day or even a week or two of backpacking. For short duration excursions, I'm only worried about energy and keeping my protein intake high enough that my body doesn't cannibalize muscle tissue to get that energy. Plus, the multi-vitamin powder I put in my milk powder/whey mix helps offset that anyway and is a lot more convenient than trying to carry around 20 different food items in my pack.

I might get more creative if I were doing it for leisure, but usually I've already got at least 50 pounds of equipment for whatever we're doing even before I get to the food. So beyond that, simplicity is gold. I'm all about just dropping a spoon and a jar of peanut butter into my side pack so all I have to do for a snack is open it up and grab a spoonful of pure energy. Don't even have to stop walking.

I like to try and pack as light as possible, so that can limit my food choices. While I do like yummy eats--if it came down to packing lighter or having good things to eat--I would go for food as fuel each time. I much rather enjoy hiking through nature instead of feeling encumbered from carrying things you don't 100 percent need. But hopefully, I can find a happy medium. I really want to do a week long backpacking adventure when I get back home and get settled in. That would be my longest so far. I'm still a newbie and nowhere near an experienced backpacker like that guy was talking about in his video. But the only way you get experience is to do it and obviously make sure you are very prepared.

"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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02-12-2015, 09:38 PM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
A few of the Army issue dehydrated meals. I have a small stockpile of these in my car. The stroganoff is actually really good.

[Image: IRxvu2B.jpg]

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05-12-2015, 12:36 PM (This post was last modified: 05-12-2015 11:49 PM by jennybee.)
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
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"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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08-12-2015, 12:04 PM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
I deleted my above post because in the video I posted you couldn't see the prettiness of the mountain very well--and my dog was taking a shit right in the middle of my video. He really has the best timing Laugh out load Hobo

I took this picture of the mountain today when I was taking my dog for a walk... I thought it looked like a painting kinda...

I will post some more pics and possibly videos (that don't include my dog pooping in them Tongue ) for you guys to see the next time I go hiking there. Wink

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"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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21-12-2015, 03:02 PM
RE: Hiking and Backpacking Thread
It's been rainy here so no hiking lately for me No But I have been watching some survival videos--I thought this one was cool.




"Let the waters settle and you will see the moon and stars mirrored in your own being." -Rumi
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