Historical Weapons
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14-06-2016, 11:30 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
Robert O'Connell wrote a great book on the history of weaponry, The Soul of the Sword.

I think a charging phalanx would discourage me pretty quickly.
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14-06-2016, 11:31 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
(14-06-2016 11:30 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:  Robert O'Connell wrote a great book on the history of weaponry, The Soul of the Sword.

I think a charging phalanx would discourage me pretty quickly.

Prometheus effect? (They couldn't change directions. Move out of their way and you're safe.)
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14-06-2016, 11:34 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
As horrifying as many of these things are, I still find modern favorites like white phosphorous and VX most unnerving.

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14-06-2016, 11:39 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
(14-06-2016 11:34 AM)yakherder Wrote:  As horrifying as many of these things are, I still find modern favorites like white phosphorous and VX most unnerving.

During deployment processing for Desert Storm, we had a briefing on NBC warfare. We got a pamphlet detailing symptoms of nerve-gas poisoning, amongst which was listed "cessation of breathing, death".

I thought, "Gee, thanks, that'll be handy to know."
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14-06-2016, 11:41 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
I'd go with the Celtic war-bow (also commonly referred to as the English longbow, though it dates back to far before the Angles came to Britain), which was capable of piercing all but the heaviest plate armor (something not developed until the end of the Middle Ages, around the 14th century, despite what movies would have you believe) and could deliver accurate fire at long range at a sustained fire rate of six shots a minute.

Facing an entire unit of English and Welsh longbowmen, with the arrows whistling down from above, would have absolutely terrified me.

Edit to Add: One of my favorite movies. The archery starts just after the 2 minute mark.




"Theology made no provision for evolution. The biblical authors had missed the most important revelation of all! Could it be that they were not really privy to the thoughts of God?" - E. O. Wilson
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14-06-2016, 11:54 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
(14-06-2016 11:41 AM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  I'd go with the Celtic war-bow (also commonly referred to as the English longbow, though it dates back to far before the Angles came to Britain), which was capable of piercing all but the heaviest plate armor (something not developed until the end of the Middle Ages, around the 14th century, despite what movies would have you believe) and could deliver accurate fire at long range at a sustained fire rate of six shots a minute.

Facing an entire unit of English and Welsh longbowmen, with the arrows whistling down from above, would have absolutely terrified me.

Edit to Add: One of my favorite movies. The archery starts just after the 2 minute mark.



The archers got some bad shellfish and contracted "the runs". They lined up for battle anyway, without their trousers.
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14-06-2016, 12:02 PM
RE: Historical Weapons
(14-06-2016 11:54 AM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  The archers got some bad shellfish and contracted "the runs". They lined up for battle anyway, without their trousers.

Yes, in the Battle of Agincourt was the end of a long and difficult march in bad weather conditions, and as a result of the poor English grasp of camp sanitation most of them were sick with Dysentery, while the French were fresh to the field. It makes the English resistance at that battle even more remarkable.

Though a great and highly athletic warrior, known for being able to vault onto the back of his horse in full armor, it is worth noting that Henry V shit himself to death at the age of 36.

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14-06-2016, 12:06 PM
RE: Historical Weapons
(14-06-2016 12:02 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  
(14-06-2016 11:54 AM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  The archers got some bad shellfish and contracted "the runs". They lined up for battle anyway, without their trousers.

Yes, in the Battle of Agincourt was the end of a long and difficult march in bad weather conditions, and as a result of the poor English grasp of camp sanitation most of them were sick with Dysentery, while the French were fresh to the field. It makes the English resistance at that battle even more remarkable.

Though a great and highly athletic warrior, known for being able to vault onto the back of his horse in full armor, it is worth noting that Henry V shit himself to death at the age of 36.
I've read that the archers could put three arrows in the air at the same time, consecutively, of course. Is that true?
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14-06-2016, 12:13 PM
RE: Historical Weapons
yes totally believable. Arrows at a high angle are going to have some hang time.
My neighbor with a cannon for an arm could throw two snow balls at you on high angle and hit you with the hardball throw while you were plotting and dodging the first two.
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14-06-2016, 12:15 PM
RE: Historical Weapons
(14-06-2016 12:02 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  
(14-06-2016 11:54 AM)Gawdzilla Wrote:  The archers got some bad shellfish and contracted "the runs". They lined up for battle anyway, without their trousers.

Yes, in the Battle of Agincourt was the end of a long and difficult march in bad weather conditions, and as a result of the poor English grasp of camp sanitation most of them were sick with Dysentery, while the French were fresh to the field. It makes the English resistance at that battle even more remarkable.

Though a great and highly athletic warrior, known for being able to vault onto the back of his horse in full armor, it is worth noting that Henry V shit himself to death at the age of 36.

That's how I wanna leave this world.

'Murican Canadian
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