Historical Weapons
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15-06-2016, 01:00 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
(14-06-2016 03:15 PM)RocketSurgeon76 Wrote:  
(14-06-2016 01:35 PM)Deesse23 Wrote:  To many knights, and particularly to the french nobility (who made up the bulk of the force at Agincourt for example), the bow was not a honourable knights weapon, much like the u-boat in WWI. They considered non-hand-to-hand combat dishonorable. The bow was the ultimate dishonourable weapon to them.

That was definitely part of it. Technically the French didn't even have crossbows, but hired mercenaries from Genoa to provide their fire support to the advancing French cavaliers.

Exactly. On one hand they knew project weapons to be quite effective, on the other they considered them to be dishonorable. So lets hire some "dishonorable foreighers who are better trained than we are anyway" to do the dirty work. Thats how they got the italian x-bows.

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15-06-2016, 01:51 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
In response to the OP:
Whistling Arrows were a think too. Were used just about everywhere, China, Japan, Europe, Mid-East
[Image: 5286622ba70caf50922c2d56a701a365.jpg]

Whistling arrows are a pain, but Boars or War Dogs would likely be worse, especially since most armies that used Boars as war animals (including the Romans) lit the poor critters on fire so that in their panic and pain, they'd never stop their charge into an enemy. Incendiary Pigs, screaming, writhing, charging you by the hundreds. Yeah, I'd rather take the arrows or rocks.

Most weapons back then were pretty nasty. From the Golden Horde blockading a city so that they couldn't get out and then catapulting dead bodies over the walls (including Cows, just like Monty Python) to Chariots with scythes on the wheels to maim you on a drive by, nothing back then was particularly nice. Even the basic fighting weapons were pretty terrible.

There's tales of what the Greeks encountered when the fought the Roman Legions for the first time. The Roman Gladius, particular the Iberian based one (the most used for war fare until the later years of the Empire) was just as much as a hacking tool as it was a thrusting weapon. Roman CQC doctrine relied on thrusts from behind the shield, by sword dancing was still an option too, anything goes when you're fighting for your life amongst the crowded chaos. Greeks had stories of how the Roman's Gladius and it's broadened blade acted as an axe, and was hewing limbs off as Roman attempted hacking and slashing swings. Because the Gladius is not that long, it lacked the mass to provide the inertia to power the swing to cut all the way through most limbs, living Greek Hoplites with nearly hacked off arms and legs that were only hanging on by stings of skin and sinew. That grizzly picture provided by the Greeks just shows you are terrible close quarter's combat back then was. Any combat with CQC is quite brutal.
My Grandfather served IN D-Day, but he served in Italy, Sicily and in Africa and the Battle of the Bulge through middle Europe under Patton. While he never said much about D-Day, he said only ONE thing about Italy - he said it was worse. To prove it, he saved an old Italian Bayonet. It was designed to be detached from the weapon, with it's hollow hilt large enough to be used in hand combat. It's lower tang on the blade was serrated, and the blade was broad. I can image then, what he meant. In those battles in Italy, from house to house and building to building, Americans and Italians were literally hacking each other to pieces like the Legions of old. It must've been a blood bath.
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15-06-2016, 02:35 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
"Straight arming" the bow is definitely superior to pulling the string according to my friend (lives in Yellow Knife, hunts bear with his bow, needs psychiatric care if you ask me.)
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15-06-2016, 04:28 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
What in this thread is the definition of "historical"? Is there and age limit? say for instance The middle ages, or does 20th century weaponry count as well.

Forgive me. My brain is moving rather slowly at present.

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15-06-2016, 04:33 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
(15-06-2016 04:28 AM)Banjo Wrote:  What in this thread is the definition of "historical"? Is there and age limit? say for instance The middle ages, or does 20th century weaponry count as well.

Forgive me. My brain is moving rather slowly at present.

Barn yard estimate: Pre-20th Century. Real world: Whatever you like. I have a Browning M2 .50 that was first issued to the troops in 1968.
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15-06-2016, 06:00 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
Here is an interesting tit bit. It was not until the US civil war with the inventions such as the railroad, that large armies were able to move at the speed of ancient armies such as the Romans.

Those ancients had their shit together. Smile

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15-06-2016, 07:03 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
(15-06-2016 04:28 AM)Banjo Wrote:  What in this thread is the definition of "historical"? Is there and age limit? say for instance The middle ages, or does 20th century weaponry count as well.

Forgive me. My brain is moving rather slowly at present.

Whatever you like Banjo. There isn’t a litmus test. If you want we can say it has to be older than Chas to qualify. Angel

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15-06-2016, 07:05 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
(15-06-2016 07:03 AM)Full Circle Wrote:  
(15-06-2016 04:28 AM)Banjo Wrote:  What in this thread is the definition of "historical"? Is there and age limit? say for instance The middle ages, or does 20th century weaponry count as well.

Forgive me. My brain is moving rather slowly at present.

Whatever you like Banjo. There isn’t a litmus test. If you want we can say it has to be older than Chas to qualify. Angel

Low blow. Big Grin

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15-06-2016, 08:17 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
(15-06-2016 06:00 AM)Banjo Wrote:  Here is an interesting tit bit. It was not until the US civil war with the inventions such as the railroad, that large armies were able to move at the speed of ancient armies such as the Romans.

Those ancients had their shit together. Smile
Then consider they built a fortified camp every night when they stopped marching.
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15-06-2016, 10:04 AM
RE: Historical Weapons
At work.

Ah... bloody Romans! What've they ever done for us!

Tongue

Wink

Unable to provide links but the 'Hatra' balista is an interesting development on said classical stone/bolt thrower.

Also, from archeological digs there was much standardization of stone shot. As in it's quite obvious and distinct that quality stone masons were involved in fashioning the round same weight missiles.
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