History of the F Word
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30-08-2015, 11:36 PM
RE: History of the F Word
fuck (v.) "to have sexual intercourse with" (transitive), until recently a difficult word to trace in usage, in part because it was omitted as taboo by the editors of the original OED when the "F" entries were compiled (1893-97). Johnson also had excluded the word, and fuck wasn't in a single English language dictionary from 1795 to 1965. "The Penguin Dictionary" broke the taboo in the latter year. Houghton Mifflin followed, in 1969, with "The American Heritage Dictionary," but it also published a "Clean Green" edition without the word, to assure itself access to the public high school market.

Written form attested from early 16c.; OED 2nd edition cites 1503, in the form fukkit, and the earliest attested appearance of current spelling is 1535 ("Bischops ... may fuck thair fill and be vnmaryit" [Sir David Lyndesay, "Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaits"]). Presumably it is a more ancient word, but one not written in the kind of texts that have survived from Old English and Middle English. Buck cites proper name John le Fucker from 1278, but that surname could have other explanations. The word apparently is hinted at in a scurrilous 15c. poem, titled "Flen flyys," written in bastard Latin and Middle English. The relevant line reads:

Non sunt in celi
quia fuccant uuiuys of heli

"They [the monks] are not in heaven because they fuck the wives of [the town of] Ely." Fuccant is pseudo-Latin, and in the original it is written in cipher. The earliest examples of the word otherwise are from Scottish, which suggests a Scandinavian origin, perhaps from a word akin to Norwegian dialectal fukka "copulate," or Swedish dialectal focka "copulate, strike, push," and fock "penis." Another theory traces the Modern English verb to Middle English fyke, fike "move restlessly, fidget" (see fike) which also meant "dally, flirt," and probably is from a general North Sea Germanic word (compare Middle Dutch fokken, German ficken "fuck," earlier "make quick movements to and fro, flick," still earlier "itch, scratch;" the vulgar sense attested from 16c.). This would parallel in sense the vulgar Middle English term for "have sexual intercourse," swive, from Old English swifan "to move lightly over, sweep" (see swivel). But OED remarks that these "cannot be shown to be related" to the English word. Liberman has this to say:

Germanic words of similar form (f + vowel + consonant) and meaning 'copulate' are numerous. One of them is G. ficken. They often have additional senses, especially 'cheat,' but their basic meaning is 'move back and forth.' ... Most probably, fuck is a borrowing from Low German and has no cognates outside Germanic.

Chronology and phonology rule out Shipley's attempt to derive it from Middle English firk "to press hard, beat." The unkillable urban legend that this word is an acronym of some sort (a fiction traceable on the Internet to 1995 but probably predating that), and the "pluck yew" fable, are results of ingenious trifling (also see here). The Old English verb for "have sexual intercourse with" was hæman, from ham "dwelling, home," with a sense of "take home, co-habit." French foutre and Italian fottere seem to resemble the English word but are unrelated, descending rather from Latin futuere, which perhaps is from PIE root *bhau(t)- "knock, strike off," extended via a figurative use "from the sexual application of violent action" [Shipley; compare the sexual slang use of bang, etc.].

Fuck was outlawed in print in England (by the Obscene Publications Act, 1857) and the U.S. (by the Comstock Act, 1873). The word continued in common speech, however. During World War I: "It became so common that an effective way for the soldier to express this emotion was to omit this word. Thus if a sergeant said, 'Get your ----ing rifles!' it was understood as a matter of routine. But if he said 'Get your rifles!' there was an immediate implication of urgency and danger." [John Brophy, "Songs and Slang of the British Soldier: 1914-1918," pub. 1930]. The legal barriers against use in print broke down in mid-20c. with the "Ulysses" decision (U.S., 1933) and "Lady Chatterley's Lover" (U.S., 1959; U.K., 1960). The major breakthrough in publication was James Jones' "From Here to Eternity" (1950), with 50 fucks (down from 258 in the original manuscript).


http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=fuck

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30-08-2015, 11:41 PM
RE: History of the F Word
Quote:The oldest occurrence of the word in adjectival form (which implies use of the verb) in English comes from the margins of a 1528 manuscript copy of Cicero's De Officiis. A monk had scrawled in the margin notes, "fuckin Abbot". Whether the monk meant the word literally, to accuse this abbott of "questionable monastic morals," or whether he used it "as an intensifier, to convey his extreme dismay" is unclear.[14]

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31-08-2015, 03:47 AM
RE: History of the F Word
Did anyone else hear background noise like knocking and a few thumps on that sound track?

And why all the spelling mistakes?
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31-08-2015, 03:57 AM
RE: History of the F Word
(31-08-2015 03:47 AM)Mathilda Wrote:  Did anyone else hear background noise like knocking and a few thumps on that sound track?

And why all the spelling mistakes?

I think they made it before spell check was invented.

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31-08-2015, 06:34 AM
RE: History of the F Word
(30-08-2015 08:57 PM)cactus Wrote:  I love how you can construct a single sentence using only the f-word.
Fuck, fucking fucked-up fuckers fucking fuck fucking fucked-up fuckers!

Absofuckinglutely!

Excuse me, I'm making perfect sense. You're just not keeping up.

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31-08-2015, 07:07 AM
RE: History of the F Word
Your mastery of the English language is incomplete, until you can use the word "fuck" as a noun, a verb, pronoun, adjective, adverb, interjection, preposition and conjunction.


Anyone who uses "the f-word" instead of the noble word "fuck", should be taken out and stoned to death for blasphemy.

.......................................

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31-08-2015, 07:43 AM
RE: History of the F Word
Many years ago I worked with a young girl.
One day I said to her.

"T@#&*, do you realise that in the last two minutes you have said the word fuck 37 times."
Her reply.

"Fuck off, I don't fucking swear that fucking much."

Me, "Forty times now."

Her, "Who the fuck is fucking counting?"

Me, "Me."

Her, "Well, fucking stop it."

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31-08-2015, 08:06 AM
RE: History of the F Word
(31-08-2015 07:43 AM)stevec Wrote:  Many years ago I worked with a young girl.
One day I said to her.

"T@#&*, do you realise that in the last two minutes you have said the word fuck 37 times."
Her reply.

"Fuck off, I don't fucking swear that fucking much."

Me, "Forty times now."

Her, "Who the fuck is fucking counting?"

Me, "Me."

Her, "Well, fucking stop it."

Consider Have we met?

Tongue

She's sound pretty fuckin' awesome.

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31-08-2015, 08:34 AM
RE: History of the F Word
For the record, I wasn't holding up that acronym as the real origin, that's why I said it was hilarious.

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31-08-2015, 10:24 AM
RE: History of the F Word
(31-08-2015 08:34 AM)WillHopp Wrote:  For the record, I wasn't holding up that acronym as the real origin, that's why I said it was hilarious.

Another version of the "acronym hypothesis" became the name of a 1991 Van Halen album.




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